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Invaders from Mars (Doctor Who) Audio CD – Audiobook, 1 Jan 2002

3.3 out of 5 stars 8 customer reviews

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Audio CD, Audiobook, 1 Jan 2002
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Product details

  • Audio CD
  • Publisher: Big Finish Productions Ltd (1 Jan. 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1903654572
  • ISBN-13: 978-1903654576
  • Product Dimensions: 14.1 x 1 x 12.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 696,315 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

3.3 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

‘Invaders from Mars’ was written and directed by Mark Gatiss was recorded on 16 and 17 January 2001. The headline on the Invaders from Mars cover is from a real newspaper reporting the War of the Worlds panic. The imitation poster on the CD booklet was drawn by Mark Gatiss. Actors David Benson (who plays both ‘Orson Welles’ and ‘Professor Stepashin’) and Ian Hallard (who plays ‘Mouse’ and ‘Winkler’) both appeared in the Doctor Who episode Robot of Sherwood, which was also written by Mark Gatiss. The story formed part of an Eighth Doctor series on BBC Radio 7 in 2005, alongside the stories 'Shada', 'Storm Warning', 'The Stones of Venice', ‘Sword of Orion’ and 'The Chimes of Midnight' and has been repeated on multiple occasions since. This led to the commissioning of the original series The Eighth Doctor Adventures, debuting on the digital station in December 2006. Due to a limited timeslot, scenes were edited out of these versions; excluding 'Shada' and 'The Chimes of Midnight', these were collated into 'The Eighth Doctor Collection' in 2008 with an exclusive behind-the-scenes documentary and booklet. 'Minuet in Hell' was excluded from broadcast due to its adult themes. The Invaders from Mars was the original title for the 1970 Third Doctor story, The Ambassadors of Death.

Some mistakes:

1. There were 48 States in the United States in 1938, not 49 as Chaney claims.

2. The CIA was not established until 1947, almost nine years after the events portrayed here.

3. Welles fails to recognise a Shakespearean quotation.

4. Don Chaney claims to own a 1929 Lamborghini previously owned by Al Capone, but Lamborghinis did not exist until 1963.
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Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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The more I listen to this audio, the better it gets. From the, frankly, hilarious cod-American accents of the UK's finest (Spaced's Simon Pegg and Jessica Stevenson) to the simple audacity of the plot, this is top notch entertainment.

It does need several hearings, like a good court case, to really appreciate the fun of the whole enterprise and the sheer love of the form that Gatiss possesses.

I think this is his best script for Doctor Who in any format. The TV episode seemed somehow too hidebound (and the Doctor in that one was so GULLIBLE...) and constricted. "Invaders From Mars" would make a great David Tennant story though!

Four stars because it does take a certain amount of commitment to really get the idea.
Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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The central idea of a real alien invasion during Welles famous broadcast is a good one but the overall story didn't grip me. The doctor has a brief flirtation with being a private detective, there are spies, CIA, Nazis but the overall piece is confused.

The Orson Welles realisation is good, in particular his disdain for the HG Wells material. Where is fails is exemplified by the ending - the Doctor has the idea of using the Welles broadcast to scare off the real aliens, then gives the game away but it doesn't matter as an independent character destroys the alien ship in the end.

There are much better Eighth Doctor / Charley Pollard adventures such as Stones of Venice
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I'm a huge fan of writer mark gatiss and of Paul mcgann's eighth doctor but this one really wasn't my cup of tea. I'm probably in the minority but when doctor who does recent history with silly celebrities it's an absolute turn off for me. Here orson welles gets a needless starring role in a war of the words homage (term used very loosely). Very disappointing but I know this one has it's fans and I shall continue to support mcgann and gatiss.
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