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on 28 July 2002
This book provides a most useful and detailed introduction to the practices of British journalists The advice proffered here has stood the test of "best practice" by experienced practitioners in both print and broadcasting journalism in a wide range of contexts. The suggestions and recommendations for the novitiate journalism student are exhaustively set out in conveniently-organised chapters. These have the authentic ring of truth based on the authors' own varied experiences as journalist practitioners within the media industries.
It is this practical basis for the skills and "know-how", based on many years' first-hand experience which is the book's major strength, and which is so invaluable for the new-comer. The advice is reliable, detailed and covers most of the situations which student journalists will encounter in their initial journalistic assignments. From advice on careful preparation and planning through to the successful and professional execution of assignments, the authors lead readers through the common situations, problems and well-tried solutions which they are likely to encounter.
The book can be thoroughly recommended as a first-rate comprehensive textbook for all those students of journalism who take their vocational training and education seriously enough to emulate "best practice". It can be used both as a handy reference work and for invaluable advice, from two "safe pairs of hands", on how best to tackle the many and varied situations which modern "multiskilled" journalists may find themselves in.

Desmond Smith,
Senior Lecturer in Journalism.
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on 19 June 2002
I purchased this book initially because Trevor Ibbotson has been my teacher for a course I have been taking in City and Guilds Radio and Press and was I intrigued by the idea of one of my teachers having a book!
I am hoping to have a career in Journalism and the book has been wonderful - commonly now referred to as "my bible"!
It has balance - it is not a struggle to read or a bore with information and detail that will leave you dumb struk but instead covers points well and will not leave any questions or confusion.
It was nice to have a journalism book with a difference. Instead of focussing on how to write and what a journalist should and should not do it involves Radio Journalism, Media Law, Governement, Local Government,Health and Safety, Bacjkground info and History to name a few.
Chapters are organised claerly with all important information easily accessible as well as websites and tips on how to further any research.
I absolutly love the book, whether I may be bias or not -
In fact I sat my exam today,(19th June) and although I found it challenging it would have been impossible without "the Bible - An Introduciton to Journalism".
Basically thank you!
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on 19 June 2002
I purchased this book initially because Trevor Ibbotson has been my teacher for a course I have been taking in City and Guilds Radio and Press and was I intrigued by the idea of one of my teachers having a book!
I am hoping to have a career in Journalism and the book has been wonderful - commonly now referred to as "my bible"!
It has balance - it is not a struggle to read or a bore with information and detail that will leave you dumb struk but instead covers points well and will not leave any questions or confusion.
It was nice to have a journalism book with a difference. Instead of focussing on how to write and what a journalist should and should not do it involves Radio Journalism, Media Law, Governement, Local Government,Health and Safety, Background info and History to name a few.
Chapters are organised clearly with all important information easily accessible as well as websites and tips on how to further any research.
I absolutly love the book, whether I may be bias or not -
In fact I sat my exam today,(19th June) and although I found it challenging it would have been impossible without "the Bible - An Introduciton to Journalism".
Basically thank you!
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on 8 October 2002
An Introduction to Journalism by Richard Rudin and Trevor Ibbotson is an essential book for both aspiring and experienced journalists.
This up to date text illustrates techniques and required skills for potential journalists and details information on training possibilities and providers, including contact information and web site addresses. It also acts as an essential aid for working journalists, with industry regulations and restrictions and useful tips on how to avoid being sued.
Written in large print and using everyday language the book deals with the very in depth and somewhat complicated profession in a way that both seasoned pros and total amateurs can understand. The question and answer format is refreshingly effective and makes locating information a quick and easy task, and the reader is assisted by a detailed index and chaptering system. There are even some pictures to emphasise some of the points further.
The book was written by two experienced professionals who not only publish and broadcast but also lecture and consult on the subject. This means they have been able to include just about everything you could need to know on how to succeed in the field of journalism.
Anyone considering a career in the media, or needing a reference book to assist his or her current career needs look no further. This is the definitive guide and if you only buy one book on the subject then I strongly advise you, this is the one.
Steve Solomon is a student on City & Guilds Media Techniques course at Truro College Open Learning Centre, Cornwall
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on 24 July 2002
Whenever I see another book about journalism, I think to myself 'tell me something new'. I've worked in the field for nearly 25 years and often think there's very little anyone can tell me about what goes on in a newsroom.
But this book does just that. When I read it, I was constantly discovering something new about journalism. It provides a fresh approach to one of the most intriguing professions. The authors' evident skills and experience are brought to the fore making this book an absolute must for anyone thinking of entering the profesion.
Not only that, but those of us who are working journalists can benefit. There are invaluable reference sections can help point us in the right direction in what is a rapidly changing world.
This book should be on every journalist's bookshelf.
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on 18 July 2002
"An Introduction to Journalism" contains a heady mix of the historical; the practical; the legal and the ethical and I cannot recommend it highly enough to aspiring journalists. It is also written in an extremely engaging way, which is not how I remember my academic books. As a former BBC senior editor, I found this book provides both valuable information for newcomers and useful reference material for old hands.
The level of detail is impressive, especially given that it's trying to appeal to every type of journalist from the newspaper writer to the web producer. And that is also its strength, in that it allows the reader to view the industry from all sides. With a useful mix of real-life examples of good working practice - including guidance on how to sit and breathe properly before a radio broadcast - and posing serious questions in the practical exercises after each chapter, this is not lightweight stuff.
The authors have gained a wealth of experience between them in journalism and they have assembled their knowledge and put it into context, and, in doing so, have displayed an all-too evident passion for the industry both have spent their working lives in.
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on 29 June 2004
This book is an invaluable core reference work for undergraduate journalism students. But it is much more than that. Each chapter ends with suggested activities for students and tutors, making it a useful learning tool, and it is also a practical hands-on guide for anyone working in a newsroom; well-written, accessible and not without humour. Alongside strong explanations of newspaper and broadcasting techniques, there are summaries of Law and Public Administration which anyone of my vintage can only welcome (it's nearly thirty years since I gained my NCTJ Proficiency Certificate). The practical guide to freelance working and the chapter on Health and Safety are particularly strong. Keep it on your bookshelf next to the dictionary.
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on 12 July 2006
John Hartley says that books on journalism by journalists are only interesting once everyone else is dead. This book is very interesting and completely alive with materially that is consistently useful, both practically and intellectually. In Media Studies, the perspective of the reporter or broadcaster, however reflective, is seldom seen as worthwhile as that of the sociologist, historian or cultural studies writer. In short, the opinion of the onlooker is often privileged over that of the practitioner. An Introduction to Journalism comes from Richard Rudin and Trevor Ibbotson's unusual position as practitioner/teachers and what is clear is that the authors are as committed to one (practice) as the other (teaching). Written in a clear and lively style, this is no dull training manual. The book champions the role and importance of best practice in journalism at time when the lowest common denominator, in the press and certainly on television, is a very real threat to credibility in news reporting. What shines through the text is the authors' sensitivity to the culture of journalism and information gathering, its complexities and the ethical considerations that should govern relations between journalists and their sources. It's commendable that Rudin and Ibbotson don't gloss over the more testing aspects of journalism. They work them out with a combination of thought, realism and a combined 50 years' experience as working journalists. The attention given to radio journalism, which is so taken-for-granted, is especially welcome. If you're business is journalism, then An Introduction to Journalism really does the business. A splendid book.
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on 24 September 2010
I was advised to buy this book for my BA(hons) Journalism course at university. It was one of the first books I have found that explains everything a student needs to learn without putting you to sleep. This book, however, does not have to be simply for students, it can be used for people already working within the industry so that they can touch up on their facts and rules.
I would reccomend anyone who wishes to advance themselves and start themselves up as a journalist.
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on 17 September 2005
This is an excellent book which I would recommend to anyone about to embark on or thinking of applying for a postgraduate course in journalism.
Although it gives little on the tricky business of finding work as a journalist after your course, this is not the book's aim. It outlines the different media (online, print, tv, radio) and also gives an insight into areas such as research, media law, and the workings of local and central government, which are key for most if not all journalists. It is hence also a valuable aid for those studying undergraduate journalism courses and might also be of use to students of media studies.
At postgraduate level further reading is necessary in the areas covered by this book (epecially the intricacies of law and the ways of the government which change over time), however the necessary texts are recommended and "tasks" are suggested at the end of each chapter which may also be a help to lecturers/teachers in related fields.
The book also gives lots of details on training including how and where to get training, a list of institutions at which to study, and (most importantly) what to look for from them and what they will look for from you.
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