Buy Used
£0.01
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Like New | Details
Condition: Used: Like New
Comment: *** FAST RELIABLE SERVICE *** USED,BUT IN VERY GOOD GENERAL CONDITION *** LITTLE SIGN OF PREVIOUS OWNERSHIP. This book is in AS NEW condition.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Interpretation of Dreams (Penguin Freud library) Paperback – 30 May 1991

4.2 out of 5 stars 62 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback, 30 May 1991
£72.70 £0.01
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
£12.75
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

Product Description

Review

"What a delight, then, to have a new translation of 'The Interpretation of Dreams, ' on ethat strips off the scientistic veneer and gives us a Freud who is fresh and alive.... Lovely translation." --The New York Times Book Review
--This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

From the Back Cover

Freud's discovery that the dream is the means by which the unconscious can be explored is undoubtedly the most revolutionary step forward in the entire history of psychology. Dreams, according to his theory, represent the hidden fulfillment of our unconscious wishes. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

See all Product Description

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Freud's investigations into the question of motivation in our lives form the basis of much of psychopathology today and this book provides a readable introduction to his theories about dreams and what they can tell us about our waking lives. Each chapter has several dreams (including Freud's own) and detailed analyses of them to demonstrate how we are more affected by thoughts and concerns than we like to admit to ourselves. Not only is it an interesting read, but it's quite accessible, the reader doesn't need to be familiar with any of Freud's more complicated concepts in order to be able to understand what he's writing about. His style is thorough and thought-provoking, even if you don't find yourself agreeing with everything he writes. It's easy to criticise his theories without knowing too much about them, so this book provides a welcome introduction.
Comment 86 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By A Customer on 3 Aug. 2001
Format: Paperback
Freud's seminal work 'The Interpretation of Dreams. This is probably Freud's most popular work and, if we maintain Freud's own logic that what is remembered is most important, it perhaps also his most important work. Freud presents numerous case studies of patient's dreams and takes the reader through his process of interpretation. The work not only suggests how we might interpret dreams themselves but also reveals Freud's fundamental understanding of the structure and functioning of the psyche; the primary processes of condensation, distortion, and representation and figurability as well as secondary revision. These processes not only affect dreams but all memory and experience.
Comment 48 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
For anyone interested in how dream psychology came to be, this seems like the perfect place to start your research. And there is, in fact, no denying how much Freud has defined and shaped our understanding of the unconscious, why we dream, or the sexual / psychosexual driving forces behind our behaviours and motivations. However, as we now know today, Freud's theories stand the test of time only to some extent. His over-fixation on sexual impulses was, for example, one of the reasons which led to his infamous feud with Jung, and the truth is that part of his live-long work feels driven more by an obsession than an actual objective, pragmatic research quest. This, along with the way this book is written (a slight part might have to do with the translation, as I remember reading an older version and not being left with the same feeling) has the potential to shy away readers whose sole purpose is a curious look into such fascinating artifacts of the human psyche.

Nevertheless, this is a must read if you intend do broaden and develop your own insights regarding the dreamworld. It is, of course, filled with not-so-scientific, sometimes even highly subjective personal interpretations, but this is obviously a very revealing peak into one of the most fascinating minds in the field of Psychology, even though Freud himself was a neurologist.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
reading this volume will stir your own dreams, and make them more significant for you - Freud's journey into his own psyche is compelling reading and full of saucy and dark elements that will resonate with any reader who is honest with themselves - a bestseller once it was recognised in its time (in the first year it sold maybe 100 copies), it is strong narrative and Freud succeeds in shaping the book so we start before he recognises that dreams and their interpretation can provide insights into the human personality - a page-turner, and not technical - written early in his career, he had not developed the specialist language of his later writings. He won prizes for literature, and this is one sample of his deftness. highly recommended.
Comment 18 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is one of the must-read of Freud books. especially, this version because it is very easy, the paper are in semi-yellow and the book is light. you can bring it everywhere.
I received it very soon, sooner than my expectations.
This is a revolutionary book about interpretation of dream. it is very important that the language and terms are chosen in a way that everybody can read it, not just specialist in this field.
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I wouldn't dream (pardon the pun) to review Freud's work here, experts are required for this kind of undertaking

this is just to say that before buying this book you should know that according to Jeff Masson (who is a true Freud expert), this translation is not the best. Strachey did not speak fluent German and many times he simply did not understand the words, let alone Freud's ideas in their entire subtlety and complexity.

I would recommend that you look for better, more modern translations (this particular one, the Feb 2010 edition, was done in 1953!)

on a different note, this particular edition is also not great because the print font is very, very small (10 point Garamond in the main print, even smaller in the many, many notes. The spacing is also tiny. Very tiring on the eye). And the book is nowhere near the 4.3 cm thickness claimed by the Amazon description, it is in fact just 3.5 cm.

according to Amazon there is an Interpretation of Dreams to be published in Nov 2010 which has Masson's name on it. Now that should be interesting!
1 Comment 10 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse


Feedback