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Interactive Data Visualization for the Web Paperback – 5 Apr 2013

3.9 out of 5 stars 14 customer reviews

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Frequently Bought Together

  • Interactive Data Visualization for the Web
  • +
  • Data Visualization with D3.js Cookbook
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  • Visualize This: The Flowing Data Guide to Design, Visualization, and Statistics
Total price: £67.75
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Product details

  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: O'Reilly Media; 1 edition (5 April 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1449339735
  • ISBN-13: 978-1449339739
  • Product Dimensions: 17.8 x 1.2 x 23.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 113,289 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product Description

Book Description

An Introduction to Designing with D3

About the Author

Scott Murray is a code artist who writes software to create data visualizations and other interactive phenomena. His work incorporates elements of interaction design, systems design, and generative art.

Scott is an Assistant Professor of Design at the University of San Francisco, where he teaches data visualization and interaction design. He is a contributor to Processing (processing.org), and he teaches workshops on creative coding.

Scott earned an A.B. from Vassar College and an M.F.A. from the Dynamic Media Institute at the Massachusetts College of Art and Design. His work can be seen at alignedleft.com.


Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Data in its native form is quite dull, typically hundreds or thousands of pieces of text or numbers. When presented in this raw form, or in tabulated form it is difficult to interpret for anyone accept experts. Data visualisation provides a way to present information in an interesting and informative manner. You can you professional tools such as SPSS or Excel to create data visualisations, but, along with the price, these tools have limitations on the options they have for producing visualisations and export of static images. An alternative approach is create data visualisations on the web using a javascript library such as D3. Using D3 you can create highly customised, dynamic, and interactive data visualisations to reach a wide audience with only a little experience of web development or data visualisation. This book provides a gentle introduction to web development technologies that provide a grounding for using the D3 javascript library. These web technologies include HTML, DOM, CSS, SVG, and Javascript. The book continues with step by step instructions on how to download the D3 library, and how to set up a basic template project and folder. From here information is provided on how to format and import data into an html file using D3 so that you can start developing your own visualisations.

Each chapter builds upon the knowledge learnt in the previous chapters to demonstrate how to create simple to more complex and more interactive data visualisations. There are many ways to create visualisations using D3, but the book explores simple but powerful methods to create visualisations and to add interactivity. The earlier chapters create simple elements, and then go on to create bar charts with all the elements you would expect including bars, labels, scales, axes, and colours.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I'm sure this book in kindle format could be very good, however it currently is not.

How can you have a data visualisation book in kindle format where non of the images display?

I would like my money back until this issue is resolved?
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Shame on you O'Reilly - your main job as a publisher is to get a book from the author to the reader, and in this simple task you have scored an Epic Fail. I think this is a really great book, but because this kindle edition randomly misses several characters every other sentence, it's virtually unreadable. Most of the paragraphs can be filled in by the brain with a little pause and thought but bits that involve code, javascript or technical explanations become very confusing and next to useless. Can you not proofread? Did you not bother to check the content before you published it on the worlds largest electronic bookshop? It's insulting to the customers who pay good money for a license to read a non-tangible good that you can't even perform this simple task, and correct it if there are problems. Last time I buy O'Reilly.

This is very unfair on the author, who looks to have written an excellent book. Unfortunately I've given up trying to read it after a couple of chapters.
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Format: Paperback
Good: starts from basics building up fast, covers lots of topics
Bad: not for novices, won't show you everything that d3.js can do

I bought this book back in April 2013 from O'Reilly. I have both the print and e-book versions. I was surprised to see a low rating in Amazon reviews as I found this book really helpful in learning d3.js and that is what prompted me to write this review.

First off, you need to have some programming experience to use this. The author tries hard to start with the very basics, but there's too much to learn about HTML, CSS and Javascript for a beginner before attempting to code with d3.js. In my opinion, you need to appreciate HTML coding and CSS at least. The book helps you through the DOM model and how SVG fits in, and the web can fill in gaps too. I used the web to fnd out a lot about the DOM model and SVG but I don't think this is a weakness of the book. There is a lot of knowledge requied to make d3.js work, and you just have to get it somewhere. You can't expect one book to give you all of that. I ended up buying Douglas Crockford's "Javascript: the definitive guide" as well and it has served me well.

The sequence of chapters is very logical, and the author steps you through all the prerequisites of the technology very clearly. After that, when beginning to use d3 to visualise data, the style is tutorial, and by the end of the book you can do a lot. Maybe you can't do the precise thing that drew you to d3.js, but you'll be well down the road. He covers a lot of the theory of data-binding but I think there's more I haven't quite understood there.

There is humour to lighten the tone and some people dislike that, but I didn't find it too jarring.
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As a journalists and teacher interested in data journalism and visualisation, I found this book easy to use and pretty informative - it steps through nicely and goes with the key concepts required to use this JSON library.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A very slim volume, it is however written well and helps you with the essentials to start up the steep learning curve.
The title is potentially misleading - this book is specifically about the D3 charting language, which is an open-source JavaScript library.
If you already know how to create a chart using D3, then there will be very little extra you will gain from reading this book.
Although it spends the first few chapters explaining about web servers, HTML and Javascript, unless you have a solid grasp of writing HTML and Javascript (or at least jQuery), you will struggle, although that is not the fault of this book.
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