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The Insider: The Private Diaries of a Scandalous Decade by [Morgan, Piers]
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The Insider: The Private Diaries of a Scandalous Decade Kindle Edition

4.3 out of 5 stars 78 customer reviews

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Length: 496 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Review

"A right, rollicking good read" (Andrew Neil Evening Standard)

"A riveting read with splendid anecdotes on almost every page" (The Times)

"This is a book of historical importance" (Peter Oborne The Spectator)

"A compelling read on any level, whether you want to consider the relationship between politics and the press, royal behaviour, the red-top world - or just want a good laugh" (Independent)

"Funny and fabulously indiscreet, this is a book that holds up a mirror to the spinning and posturing of our celebrity age ... scurrilously entertaining" (Observer)

Book Description

The most talked-about book of the year - now in paperback

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 2566 KB
  • Print Length: 496 pages
  • Publisher: Ebury Digital; New Ed edition (30 Jun. 2012)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B008DTYA10
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars 78 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #99,105 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Prior to reading this book I had thought Piers Morgan to be very irritating, hard-faced and smug. I still think he can be smug, but rather than irritating and hard-faced,I found him to be very funny and ....human. He has a heart after all. I got angry for him when he was 'shafted' and I felt for him when he had to grovel. I loved reading about the devious goings on between staff of rival papers trying to 'scoop' each other, and about politicians, Royals, celebrities etc playing their manipulating games. I had always suspected such things went on, but Piers tells it like it is. This book opens your eyes and shows what people in the public eye are REALLY like. I laughed out loud many times at some of his tales. I thoroughly enjoyed the book. It was fun and I couldn't put it down. Thanks Piers for such an entertaining read, and I apologise for ever thinking badly of you.
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Format: Paperback
Piers Morgan is undoubtedly smug and I have always found him rather irritating. However, this is an entertaining book and even though I was quite prejudiced against him, I found him surprisingly difficult to dislike.
The book is written in a diary format giving his perspective on the events of the last ten years (covering his time as editor of the News of the World and the Daily Mirror). It covers are Princess Diana's relationship with the media and her death; the war with Iraq (and the Mirror's strongly anti-war stance); New Labour and his relationship with Tony & Cherie Blair, Peter Mandelson and Alastair Campbell; his troubles with share dealing; his dealings with Rupert Murdoch, Kelvin McKenzie, Naomi Campbell, Jeremy Clarkson and other celebrities amongst many other topics.
Clearly his diary has been extensively edited to make it more readable but I would guess he has also taken the opportunity to portray himself in the best possible light and to make him appear almost prescient (he gives the impression that he has understood the full implications of important events almost instantly) while throwing in the odd, half-hearted attempt at self-deprecation in an attempt to make him appear more human and more likeable.
However, despite my reservations the book works; it is strangely addictive: once started it is very difficult to put down. It provides some interesting insight into events of the period together with some genuinely funny anecdotes.
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Format: Paperback
Like a lot of people, I saw Piers Morgan as smug and arrogant. A man more interested in selling papers than considering how much his antics affected peoples' lives. My opinion of his in this sense still hasn't changed after reading the book, however, I also see him as charming, funny and above all, quite honest (I hope) in admitting his failings, as well as being willing and ready to point out those of others.
I teach Media Studies, and I will definitely be recommending this book to my students. It gives a real insight into the workings of Fleet Street (I still call it that although it isn't Fleet Street anymore!) and how tabloids go about getting their scoops.
Fascinating reading, and highly recommended.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Well, Mr Morgan has done us all a favour. I have never read the Daily Mirror, or the News of the World (the two newssheets he edited), but I'd heard about them.
Being Editor of these tabloids seems a fun job. It sounds like an endless jaunt of parties, functions with the great and the good and tittle-tattle on the phone. As for the book itself, I feel that it should be read with Jordan's autobiography. I admit that I found them both gripping. Jordan's is awful and Pier's is gossippy.
Both give an insight into the Great Britain of today. Everything is glamour and fame. From, err, 'models', to pop groups to politicians. My god, the vanity of them all! And, oh boy, do the top dogs come out badly. Amazing the importance they all attach to their own self-aggrandizement. The back-stabbing, the petty jealousies, the fighting for little advantages, the sheer nastiness of Alastair Campbell and Cherie Blair. The duplicity, the lies. Oh my god. Awful. But, like Ms Jordan's autobiography, quite enlightening.
In fact, if you read this before May 5, you'll never vote Labour again. You have been warned.
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Format: Paperback
This volume of diaries covers ten years, starting in 1994. Piers Morgan, editor of the News of the World and then of the Mirror, gives us an insight into the often mucky world of British tabloid journalism, as well as providing a chronicle of this turbulent decade - which includes 9/11, the death of Princess Diana, the Iraq War, the rise of President Bush, the rise to power of Tony Blair's New Labour and the emergence of reality TV and the current rampant fascination with celebrities. Morgan writes straightforwardly, and there are plenty of laughs and eyebrow-raising moments. We meet, among many others, Paul Burrell, Jeremy Clarkson, Gordon Brown, Rupert Murdoch, Prince William, Cherie Blair and Mohammed Fayed, and there are lots of amusing and illuminating exchanges. Hence the four stars - this is an entertaining read. That said, Morgan, for all his occasional stabs at self-deprecation, comes across as a pretty smug character. He also has to be the most prescient man since Nostradamus; it's hard to believe there isn't a little 20/20 hindsight in operation here. And Morgan fails to mention the relationship that has defined his life in the last few years, despite frequent mentions of his family and even his village cricket team. Still, this is a very enjoyable insight into the culture of modern newspapers. Highly recommended to budding newshounds or addicts of current affairs.
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