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Inside the Third Reich: Memoirs Paperback – 1 Apr 1997

4.6 out of 5 stars 80 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 596 pages
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster; 1st Touchstone Ed edition (1 April 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0684829495
  • ISBN-13: 978-0684829494
  • Product Dimensions: 14 x 4.1 x 21 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (80 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,705,024 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Book Description

The classic account of Nazi Germany by Hitler's Armaments Minister and right-hand man. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Albert Speer was unique in the Third Reich. An intellectual architect, he was befriended by Hitler in 1933 and for the next 12 years they maintained one of the most powerful and extraordinary relationships in the Nazi hierarchy. In 1942 Speer was appointed Armaments Minister and became second only to Hitler himself as a power on the home front. But in 1945, Speer defied Hitler's scorched earth policy and began to plan his assassination. At Nuremberg he was sentenced to 20 years in prison. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.


Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
I met Albert Speer...And this was book that made me want to meet him - this and "Spandau - The Secret Diaries".

Just after Christmas in 1979 I went to see Speer at his Heidelberg home in West Germany. I had gone to interview him for BBC radio. The trip was carried out in secret. Only a couple of BBC managers, who approved the enterprise, knew what I was doing. And I told no-one until the programmes were broadcast. I went alone - no companions, or production team - just me and Speer alone in his Heidelberg study with a tape recorder running. I met him four times, recording long interviews for six half-hour programmes called "The Hitler Years". You can hear extracts on the BBC website.

So why did "Inside the Third Reich" make such an impression and make me want to meet its author? Because the book changed the way I thought about Hitler. It was the first I'd read that made Hitler seem a plausible human being. Some people say this is wrong. They argue anything that humanises Hitler is improper. He was a monster. All that matters are his crimes.

The trouble with this argument is that it makes Hitler impossible to understand - just a raving lunatic who gormless Germans - not intelligent people like us! - mindlessly followed. But Hitler was more subtle and intelligent than people allow - an evil genius with a surprising amount of twisted knowledge, well read and an extensive interest in the arts. His only weapons to begin with were his voice - he was highly articulate and persuasive - and a superhuman will-power. Hitler claimed he was the greatest actor in Europe. One of his adjutants said even in private it was impossible to tell when he was acting, or sincere. The performance was flawless. He was very convincing.
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Format: Paperback
This is a very interesting volume, written by someone who, for most of WWII, was second only to Hitler in terms of importance in Nazi Germany. Speer must have been a man of great talent and industry in order to accomplish what he did, even in the last months of the conflict: as well as managing to increase output of munitions to unprecedented levels, as the end closed in, he was also determined to prevent the implementation of the scorched earth policy which would have left post-war Germany in a state of utter annihilation. The fact that the country was able to recover so well and quickly afterwards must, in large part, be down to his efforts.

I found the book engrossing and very easy to read. At the start, it's a bit heavy on architecture, but that's what animated Hitler and Speer in the early days. There is a load of information about many of the main characters in the regime, about the continual back-biting and intriguing. There's not a lot about the fighting, although what little there is is interesting.

After the end, Speer writes about being staggered on hearing the details of the concentration camps. Earlier he wrote that Hanke, a friend and Gauleiter of Upper Silesia, had warned Speer never to visit a camp there because he had "seen something that he was not allowed to describe and indeed could not describe". Rather chilling.

First class read.
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Format: Paperback
Albert Speer's seminal work on life inside the highest echelons of the Third Reich is as historically controversial now as it was when it was released and indeed is still a fascinating read.
In fact largely `ghost written' by Joachim C. Fest who had a not insignificant impact on the style of the prose, Inside The Third Reich is a veritable Goldmine for anecdotal remarks for any student studying the history of Hitler's Germany.
Historical bias aside - there is plenty and the debate is seemingly endless - it is still worth the effort and the reader would probably benefit from having a copy of Sereny's biography to hand to see how Speer's `Mia Culpa's' developed in face of ten years of mixed reception to his work.
Every A' Level Modern History Student should have read at least the first half of this book.
One should also remember once this has been read that confidential personal correspondence written in Speer's own hand was recently sold in an auction for well over £10000, which admitted more explicit knowledge of the crimes. And in light of this, J C Fest had his private note on Speer edited and released, and consequentially greatly revised his conclusion regarding the character of Speer.
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Format: Paperback
Very interesting account of Albert Speer's time at the heart of Hitler's regime. The book gives an interesting insight into how a non-politital and unfanatical person was drawn into the Nazi environment despite his ongoing reservations. Also it portays Hitler in a different light from the usual, ie as a somewhat inept bungler rather than the usual one-dimensional view of him as pureley a megalomaniac. The writing is a bit awkward in spots and at times it can be hard to accept Speer's compliance with what he obviously felt was a criminal government but overall a very good read and highly recommended.
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This book give an insight into the man Albert Speer who trained as an architect yet ended up as Hitler's close confident and Minister of Armanents. It was an eye opener, the chaotic organisation of wartime Germany with incompetent officials in charge because they were NAZIs. How these leaders looked after their own high life whilst denying raw materials to the war effort. It was amazing that Germany never fully mobilised its women for industrial work and still allowed production of consumer goods to continue until quite late in the war. Unfortunately for the allies Albert Speer was so efficient in organising the Armanent industry that he doubled and trebled production which obviously did not help us. He has some telling insights about our bombing campaign and how it tied up hundreds of thousands of men and guns defending Germany that could have been used against the allies especially Russia. He also could not understand our lack of follow up attacks against special targets like the Ball Bearing works at Scweinfurt.
It is well worth wading through this very long book to get an Inside view of the Third Reich
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