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Ink (The Paper Gods series, Book 2) by [Sun, Amanda]
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Ink (The Paper Gods series, Book 2) Kindle Edition

3.8 out of 5 stars 29 customer reviews

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Product Description

Review

"Readers will come away more enlightened about contemporary Japanese high schools...an enjoyable peek at a world very different from America, yet inhabited by people whose hearts are utterly familiar." -Publishers Weekly

"The descriptions of life in Japan...create a strong sense of place, and set an exotic backdrop for this intriguing series opener by a debut author." -Booklist

"The unique setting and observing how Katie learns to live in...foreign surroundings...make this story special." -VOYA

"The work of a master storyteller." -Julie Kagawa, New York Times bestselling author of The Iron Fey series

"A modern day fairytale." -Amber Benson of TV's Buffy the Vampire Slayer and author of the Calliope Reaper-Jones novels

"A captivating story of love, passion, and the choices people make to keep themselves safe." -Jodi Meadows, author of Incarnate and Asunder

"Ink is a book that you sit down to read when you have a spare few minutes and then you look up and hours have passed a completely captivating story." -Book Passage Bookstore


"Readers will come away more enlightened about contemporary Japanese high schools...an enjoyable peek at a world very different from America, yet inhabited by people whose hearts are utterly familiar." -Publishers Weekly



"The descriptions of life in Japan...create a strong sense of place, and set an exotic backdrop for this intriguing series opener by a debut author." -Booklist



"The unique setting and observing how Katie learns to live in...foreign surroundings...make this story special." -VOYA



"The work of a master storyteller." -Julie Kagawa, New York Times bestselling author of The Iron Fey series



"A modern day fairytale." -Amber Benson of TV's Buffy the Vampire Slayer and author of the Calliope Reaper-Jones novels



"A captivating story of love, passion, and the choices people make to keep themselves safe." -Jodi Meadows, author of Incarnate and Asunder



"Ink is a book that you sit down to read when you have a spare few minutes and then you look up and hours have passed a completely captivating story." -Book Passage Bookstore

About the Author

Amanda Sun was born in Deep River, a small town where she could escape into the surrounding forest to read. An archaeologist by training, she speaks several languages and will write your name in Egyptian Hieroglyphics if you ask. Her debut novel, INK, is the first in the Paper Gods series and is inspired by her time in Japan, with a paranormal twist. She loves knitting, gaming, and cosplay, and lives in Toronto with her family. Find her on Twitter @Amanda_Sun or on Goodreads.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 4722 KB
  • Print Length: 384 pages
  • Publisher: MIRA Ink; 1 edition (5 July 2013)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00CMOXVM6
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars 29 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #312,329 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition
I haven't read a lot of YA fiction that is set in places other than America and Britain so it was really refreshing to read something set in a world so far away with a culture so different. Right from the very beginning of this novel, you are sucked into the authentic Japanese setting as the author frequently uses Japanese words in her writing, especially in dialogue. There is a handy glossary at the back of the book which lists all the common phrases that are repeated throughout the book which are very helpful, though, I didn't discover this until I'd finished reading the book so the glossary is more of an added bonus really. Being half Chinese, half English, myself, I completely understand how Katie feels about living in a country where you're singled out as the `foreigner' and her narrative feels so real and is so believable. I liked that this book didn't skip out on the fact that Katie obviously wasn't completely integrated into Japanese society and people did treat her differently and this added to the general `authentic' oriental feel that was running through the book.

The chemistry between the characters of Katie and Tomohiro is electric. There is no insta-love in this novel and you see a real relationship develop between the pair before anything really `romantic' actually happens. Plus, as always with oriental stories, even a hug is a big deal so progress is slow but yourself slowly falling in love with these characters as the book progresses just as they fall in love with each other. Although there is romance in this novel, it doesn't take over the story. The major plot line is about Tomohiro's drawing abilities and the romance weaves in and out with this, running parallel to this main story line throughout.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
First off, good points: imagery was beautiful and very thought provoking, lots of action and intrigue in the plot and provided a good perspective of someone adapting to a new life. However... some aspects of the plot were a bit of a let down and there were certain events I felt that they were trying to come off as sinister and didn't really lead to anything such as Katie's aunt, Diane, being physically absent for most of the book and when she called Katie would always comment on her sounding strange or saying things she didn't think her aunt would say so naturally I assumed her aunt had been abducted or something along those lines, since they've mainly talked about gangsters and secret societies I expected some intrigue, to add some drama later but no such luck. I feel her aunt might know more than she lets on but this may just be me hoping for a plot twist that isn't so obvious. You'll know what I mean when you read this.
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Format: Kindle Edition
Review also published on my blog, StudentSpyglass.com

Following the death of her mother, Katie is horrified to be sent off to Japan to live with her aunt - `the piece that never fit'. Thrust into a different culture, with only minimal Japanese and an aunt she barely knows, Katie's life only gets more complicated when she starts to see pictures moving. Unsure whether to believe her eyes, or whether these are hallucinations caused by stress and grief, Katie tries to ignore it, but she can't help feeling that the mysterious Tomohiro is somehow connected. Despite his cold reputation, Katie is drawn to Tomohiro, and as they grow closer the ink spirals further out of control.

Amanda Sun's writing is wonderfully descriptive and evocative without feeling overdone or excessively wordy. Beautiful, graphic imagery will have you easily able to visualise Shizouka, leaving you feeling completely immersed in Katie's world.

I loved Katie as a character; although reluctant to move to Japan, she threw herself into learning the language and customs, and didn't give up her feisty nature. My only criticisms are both YA cliches related to the love interest: I felt she became too attached too quickly, and that she ditched her friends for him. This seemed particularly cruel particularly considering how willing her friends were to go out of their way for her. Tomohiro was a bad boy with a tortured past, which felt a bit cliche, but I did enjoy finding out more about him and seeing their relationship grow. Diane, Katie's aunt was also a great character, though I'd have liked to see a little more of her.

Ink had a wonderfully unique premise, and I thoroughly enjoyed the occasional Japanese word, and the snippets of culture.
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By Suze Lavender TOP 500 REVIEWER on 31 July 2015
Format: Kindle Edition
Katie is getting used to her new life in Japan. She's moved there to stay with her aunt after her mother passed away. Life in Shizuoka is very different from life in America and it requires a lot of adjusting. Katie's aunt decides to send her to a Japanese school. Katie has problems with the language, so she has to take a lot of extra lessons to keep up. The food in Japan is different, she has to wear slippers in school and her blonde hair stands out wherever she goes.

Fortunately she makes friends pretty quickly. At school she also meets Tomohiro. He's aloof and cold at first and Katie can't seem to get through to him. He's great at kendo (a form of fencing), so he's the school's sports hero and a lot of people are fascinated by him. Katie's drawn to him and can't stay away. They share something strange. Tomohiro has a way with ink and even though Katie isn't gifted at drawing with it the ink is what connects them. Because of Tomohiro Katie finds out more about the Kami, powerful descendants from an ancient god. What does this have to do with Katie and Tomohiro and are they both in danger because of it?

Katie is very strong and she goes for what she wants. She's still sad about losing her mother, but she's resilient and soon she embraces the Japanese way of living. She likes the food, she makes some great friends and staying with her aunt isn't so bad. I loved learning more about Japan through her eyes. Katie soon falls in love with Tomohiro. He's like a magnet and at first she doesn't understand why exactly, but she keeps following him until he accepts her presence. She does this in a determined way, because she knows that beneath the tough and cold exterior there's a kind and caring guy who likes her back.
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