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Inferno Audio Download – Unabridged

3.9 out of 5 stars 5,692 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Audio Download
  • Listening Length: 17 hours and 17 minutes
  • Program Type: Audiobook
  • Version: Unabridged
  • Publisher: Random House Audiobooks
  • Audible.co.uk Release Date: 14 May 2013
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00CRUUKXI

Customer Reviews

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I actually wasn't going to buy Inferno given how woeful I considered The Lost Symbol to be; however, I received a copy of the book as a gift and plunged in, consuming the book in a matter of a couple of days. Whilst my earlier review of The Lost Symbol was quite positive in terms of what Brown was trying to do, large parts of my criticism of that book also apply here. The novel opens with an amnesiac Langdon waking up in a hospital room after apparently being shot in the head - we're not in Cambridge anymore Toto. I actually consider the opening of the book quite fresh; taking away Langdon's memory proves a successful literary technique for Brown, allowing him to effectively retrace Langdon's footsteps (and his own work in previous novels).

What follows is more of the same types of shenanigans we read about in Brown's previous efforts. There's a biological weapon (Angels & Demons), an assassin tracking Langdon (The Da Vinci Code), a litany of literary/art references (The Da Vinci Code) and a professor who seems far too in control. Part of what I loved about the early Langdon books was that they always showed Langdon as being out of his depth, a humble academic sucked into a situation he doesn't fully understand. He survived and saved the day through using his intellect and his instincts, making him a sort of bookish Indiana Jones. In short, he was a very good hero for the series. You'll note I'm using past tense for this; it's because he now has transformed into caricature. Everyone knows Langdon; museum curators, security guards, the Director of the World Health Organisation; basically wherever Langdon goes, he is known, accommodated, and assisted in his exploits.
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As no big fan of Dan Brown, nevertheless I read all his books. I heard about his new book to be released soon and because "Divine Comedy" whose one part is Inferno is one of my favorite literary masterpieces all back from high school. So I was very curious about new Brown's book and read it quickly after its release.

We are all aware that critics but even his fans admit his prose style is simple and easy to read, and after big hype and greater success of each following title all feel there is nothing special about his books and their plots. But for sure they entertain people providing good mix of mystery, action and history which lot of people find appealing.

"Inferno" has all the elements of a vintage Dan Brown novel. There is an unexpected event happening in the prologue and the rest of the book explains what the cause of it was. Main familiar character, Professor Robert Langdon wakes up in an unknown place without being aware how he got there. As always there is beautiful, strong heroine Sienna who helps him. The law enforcement authorities and some strange people chase him across cities and countries. The action moves across all-known European locations like Florence, Venice, and Istanbul. There are lot of references in art, architecture, sculpture and history. Some of the information is used for solving challenges that Langdon and Sienna stumble upon. And of course as always in Brown's book there is a surprise ending.

Starting with good points, the action is fast paced, book is well researched, there is a lot of information on symbolism and history behind art and architecture, and the book gives a lot of information about Dante's "The Divine Comedy". Readers who never picked Dante's book would learn a lot about it from Brown's book.
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As a tourist guide, Dan Brown's Inferno surpasses Fromers any day. Anything you ever wanted to know about Florence and Venice is described in brilliant detail, leaving nothing to the imagination. As a gripping yarn, however, Inferno is miles off course. It's riddled with repetition, leaving readers with the distinct impression that Mr. Brown was struggling to find content for the publisher. Without wishing to ruin the story for fans of Dan Brown, the plot follows Robert Langden's efforts to thwart a mad scientist hell bent on infesting the human race with an ingenious pandemic virus. The plot twists here, vaults there and re-writes itself more than once. Inferno is a far cry from Dan Brown's earlier efforts, making me wonder if his writing career has peaked early.
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Unfortunately found this to be a very frustrating read. Whilst the plot wasn't too bad, the constant need to give a little tidbit of information about this or that tourist trap led to the novel reading more like a guide book. Ultimately, if you were to take out the long, drawn out descriptions of this or that statue, the plot would likely only take up a quarter of the number of pages. I've seen filling before in a number of books, but this was really pushing the limits.

I've enjoyed Dan Browns earlier novels but felt it began to slip with The Lost Symbol and further still with Inferno. Often found myself thinking that Brown was hoping to recreate the tourism hype as was seen in the Da Vinci code. The plot itself wasn't awful but far from being above average. Robert Langdon is fast becoming the Indiana Jones of symbolism although with some of his escapades you feel he perhaps missed his calling as a super spy or general super hero.

Disappointing. Requires more focus on plot, less on tourism.
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