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Individuation and Narcissism: The Psychology of Self in Jung and Kohut Paperback – 2 May 1991

3.0 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews

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Paperback, 2 May 1991
£148.73 £1.99
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Product details

  • Paperback: 280 pages
  • Publisher: Routledge; New Ed edition (2 May 1991)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0415064643
  • ISBN-13: 978-0415064644
  • Product Dimensions: 21.5 x 13.9 x 2.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 42,146 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product description

Review

"Should be on the must' reading list of every Jungian trainee in the world. Mario Jacoby's colleagues should try to learn from it as well."-Joel Ryce-Menuhin, "Harvest

About the Author

Mario Jacoby is a director of the Jung Institute, Zurich.

Customer Reviews

3.0 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This book would have been a clear well researched review of modern psychological thinking on narcissism. Unfortunately in the kindle version the translation is appalling. The formatting is amateurish and instead of the word 'the' it says 'die'. There are numerous other typos where there are Germanic words instead of English. It makes it unnecessarily hard going. If it had been translated properly, without typos and formatted properly I would have given 5 stars because it is a light-weight summarising version of much of Kohut's work.
For the price it is poor value for money.
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Format: Paperback
No other concept in depth psychology provoked so much controversy andspawned so many schools of thought as the Self. This book is a magnificenttour d'horizon, spanning the crucial decades from Freud to Jung andtherefrom to Kohut.
The book demonstrates that, in a way, Heinz Kohutmerely took Jung a step further and invented a new vocabulary to rephrasesome of Jung's insights. He said that pathological narcissism is not theresult of excessive narcissism, libido or aggression.
It is the result of defective, deformed or incomplete narcissistic (self)structures. Kohut postulated the existence of core constructs which henamed: the Grandiose Exhibitionistic Self and the Idealized Parent Imago(see below). Children entertain notions of greatness (primitive or naivegrandiosity) mingled with magical thinking, feelings of omnipotence andomniscience and a belief in their immunity to the consequences of theiractions. These elements and the child's feelings regarding its parents(which are also painted by it with a brush of omnipotence and grandiosity)- coagulate and form these constructs.
The child's feelings towards its parents are reactions to their responses(affirmation, buffering, modulation or disapproval, punisment, evenabuse).
These responses help maintain the self-structures. Without the appropriateresponses, grandiosity, for instance, cannot be transformed into adultambitions and ideals.
To Kohut, grandiosity and idealization were positive childhood developmentmechanisms. Even their reappearance in transference should not beconsidered a pathological narcissistic regression. am Vaknin, author of"Malignant Self Love - Narcissism Revisited".
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This review doesn't have anything to do with the book itself, which is probably very interesting but is all about Amazon. I am not sure how Kindle works so not sure to complain about the editing or the transfer from paper book to e-book - probably it's both. There are countless mistakes and many of them impossible to understand what it should have been so I gave up on 6%.

I have made Amazon aware of this but haven't heard anything back - at all. So all in all a dreadful service.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta) (May include reviews from Early Reviewer Rewards Program)

Amazon.com: 4.2 out of 5 stars 6 reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Narcissism as the beginning of growth to maturity, not the tragic end of an unlived life 7 Oct. 2013
By MARITA DE WET - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Jacoby's style is both intellectually clear and empathic, from the heart. He explores the many modes of experience and behavior that we characterize as Narcissistic, and the common denominator amongst them. Aligning with Kohut to see Narcissism as a developmental task, he explores the meaningful rewards of Narcissistic maturation (empathy, humor, creativity, wisdom). He writes with great sensitivity and honesty about treatment of Narcissistic Disorders. The book gave me valuable insights and practical guidelines.
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful contents, many spelling mistakes 24 Feb. 2014
By Marina A. - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Lots and lots of mistakes in the text. It's a pity, the selling can not be corrected right in the text
1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good information but poor conversion/spelling 18 July 2013
By James - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
While it's a well written book that's easy to understand, the spelling is terrible which is more a factor of poor conversion from German to English. It occurs several times a page and while being easy enough to understand what is meant, sometimes it's not so obvious and has to be guessed (rightly or wrongly).

For the price, it's very disappointing.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Well written and authoritative 9 Aug. 2013
By Pascal Tiscali - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I am not a professional therapist or psychologist, but I do read widely in the literature of psychoanalysis and self-help. I found this book to be among the best books of recent vintage in the psychoanalytic tradition. Written to a high academic standard, but fluid and discursive in style, it belongs up there with Freud himself as a magisterial and complete treatment of an important subject.

The other great book on this subject is "Borderline conditions and pathological narcissism" by Otto Kernberg.
24 of 27 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Kohut and Jung 21 April 2004
By Sam Vaknin - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
No other concept in depth psychology provoked so much controversy and spawned so many schools of thought as the Self. This book is a magnificent tour d'horizon, spanning the crucial decades from Freud to Jung and therefrom to Kohut.
The book demonstrates that, in a way, Heinz Kohut merely took Jung a step further and invented a new vocabulary to rephrase some of Jung's insights. He said that pathological narcissism is not the result of excessive narcissism, libido or aggression.
It is the result of defective, deformed or incomplete narcissistic (self) structures. Kohut postulated the existence of core constructs which he named: the Grandiose Exhibitionistic Self and the Idealized Parent Imago (see below). Children entertain notions of greatness (primitive or naive grandiosity) mingled with magical thinking, feelings of omnipotence and omniscience and a belief in their immunity to the consequences of their actions. These elements and the child's feelings regarding its parents (which are also painted by it with a brush of omnipotence and grandiosity) - coagulate and form these constructs.
The child's feelings towards its parents are reactions to their responses (affirmation, buffering, modulation or disapproval, punisment, even abuse).
These responses help maintain the self-structures. Without the appropriate responses, grandiosity, for instance, cannot be transformed into adult ambitions and ideals.
To Kohut, grandiosity and idealization were positive childhood development mechanisms. Even their reappearance in transference should not be considered a pathological narcissistic regression. am Vaknin, author of "Malignant Self Love - Narcissism Revisited".
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