Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Kindle Price: £6.24

Save £3.75 (38%)

includes VAT*
* Unlike print books, digital books are subject to VAT.

These promotions will be applied to this item:

Some promotions may be combined; others are not eligible to be combined with other offers. For details, please see the Terms & Conditions associated with these promotions.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

The Importance of Being Kennedy by [Graham, Laurie]
Kindle App Ad

The Importance of Being Kennedy Kindle Edition

4.4 out of 5 stars 47 customer reviews

See all 7 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
£6.24
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£1.88

Length: 339 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Page Flip: Enabled

Great Reads for 99p
Browse our selection of Kindle Books discounted to 99p each. Learn more
Get a £1 reward for movies or TV
Enjoy a £1.00 reward to spend on movies or TV on Amazon Video when you purchase any Amazon Kindle Book from the Kindle Store (excluding Kindle Unlimited, Periodicals and free Kindle Books) offered by Amazon.co.uk. A maximum of 1 reward per customer applies. UK customers only. Offer ends at 23:59 on Wednesday, September 27, 2017. Terms and conditions apply

Product description

Review

'Deftly mingles comedy and sorrow, producing a serious pleasure of a novel that is both poignant and entertaining.' Penny Perrick, Sunday Times

'This is a very entertaining, often funny book, thanks to Graham's perceptive eye and deadpan wit.' The Gloss Magazine

'Brilliant novel by Laurie Graham. Narrated by her Irish nursemaid, this is a beautifully observed novel with the humour and candour you'd expect from the author of “The Ten O'Clock Horses”.' Bella

'One of Graham's undoubted strengths is the way she seamlessly blends fact and fiction. Real people, including the cream of British aristocracy, are portrayed with as much colour and verve as the fictional characters. This is an entertaining addition to the Kennedy canon, one that goes behind the public smiles to conjure up the petty jealousies and divided loyalties that plague every family. It also gives a fictional voice to two forgotten women whose troubled lives are almost completely overshadows by the Kennedy legend.' The Herald

'”The Importance of Being Kennedy” could just prove the perfect sun-lounger read.' Sunday Business Post

‘A vivid, creative storyteller.’ Judith Flanders, Times Literary Supplement

'Laurie Graham's entertaining novel delves into the Kennedy family legend, with energetic pace, witty dialogue and vividly drawn characters. With the plot already laid out for her, Graham brings her characters to life with sparky and funny dialogue.' Observer

'It's a fascinating story and one that will have you scurrying to Wikipedia to check the details (which by the way, are all true). Charming.' Time Out

Sunday Times

`entertaining...through Nora's exuberant Irish brogue, Graham pays as much attention to the less well-known siblings'.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 714 KB
  • Print Length: 339 pages
  • Publisher: Fourth Estate (3 April 2009)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B002RI91C6
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars 47 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #72,705 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  • Would you like to tell us about a lower price?


Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
A strange book which implies facts but gives you fiction. There are few revelations about this fascinating and flawed family that aren't available elsewhere.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I didn't want this book to end. My first foray into the works of Laurie Graham (but assuredly not my last...) was a delight from start to finish - and I confess I eked out the last few pages so as to make the enjoyment last. I suppose one might describe this unusual book as a 'non-fiction novel'.
I was nineteen years old when my hero JFK was murdered and I guess it was on the cards that this story of his and his eight siblings' Boston childhood and young adulthood would grab me from page one. Nora Brennan, a young Irish immigrant to America is employed as nursemaid when millionaire bootlegger and Hollywood entrepreneur Joseph Kennedy and his young wife Rose produce the first of their brood, and she stays with the ever-increasing family for many years.
The book is told from Nora's point of view and Ms Graham captures beautifully Nora's special Irish outlook on life, her sense of humour and her wonderful turn of phrase. Nora's opinions on Mrs Kennedy alone are worth the price of admission.....
As someone who has read her fair share of books about the Kennedy family, I take my hat off to Ms Graham's meticulous research. Interestingly, the book does not dwell too much on Jack, which would, perhaps have been the obvious road to take. No, it focuses largely on Kathleen the second daughter, known to her family as 'Kick' - and on her elder sister, Rosemary. The stories of these two girls would, I think, bring a tear to the driest eye.
As I said, I really didn't want the book to end, and the ending, when it came, was poignant and bitter-sweet and the final sentence stayed with me for days.
Comment 15 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
This is Laurie Graham's best book to date, with a great ear for the Irish sense of humour, and turns of phrase. The Kennedys are seen through the eyes of their Irish staff, who have a less than reverential view of the embryonic American First Family. Joe and Rose Kennedy are shown to be distant to their children, even while they push all of them to succeed, with the well-known disastrous consequences. I've read many non-fiction books about the Kennedy family, and none seemed to give such a genuine insight into their collective psyche.
Comment 24 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Having read Future Homemakers of America and enjoying it, I thought I'd try another book by Laurie Graham and she is now a firm favourite with me.

The Importance of Being Kennedy was a fantastic read - less focus was on JFK and more on the less celebrated members of the family like Rose and Kit (Kathleen). I didn't really have much knowledge of the Kennedy family history - I was vaguely aware that there had been a number of deaths - and found this hugely entertaining, so much so that I am going to read up on them a bit more, particularly poor Rose.
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I knew little about the famous Kennedy Family prior to reading this book, but now I can understand [and agree with] Laurie Graham's view that there was indeed a "Kennedy curse" and it was called Rose and Joe. With parents like them, it's not exactly surprising that events unfolded as they did.

If you weren't a Kennedy, you weren't anybody, and if you weren't Catholic you had a pretty slim chance of marrying into the clan. Money didn't seem to be a problem even with nine children to feed, but it certainly didn't buy happiness.

I read this book very quickly and enjoyed it very much. The narrator - Nora Brennan, a nursery-maid - is a lovable character who cares for the children more than their own parents do. Her descriptions of war-time London in the 1940s are eye-opening and really make you feel how depressing life must have been.

I love Laurie Graham's books. She has a wonderful way with dialogue and characterisation. I highly recommend this one!
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
After the ghastly Gone with the Windsors this book is a terrific return to form. Nora (the narrator) is hired as nursemaid to Joe and Rose Kennedy's ever increasing brood and her irreverent comments on the family are wonderful. It's worth reading, however, for that final sad sentence which stuck with me long after I'd closed the book.
Comment 13 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
This is the first Laurie Graham book I have read. I've always had an interest in the Kennedy story and have read many factual accounts on their family history. I thoroughly enjoyed this fictional story peppered with real life facts. I loved the other minor characters as well such as Fidelma the other nursery maid. Laurie Graham's way of using Irish turns of phrase made me smile, she really nailed the humourous put downs and didn't let Rose or Joe Kennedy off lightly. Highly recommend, I am now looking forward to reading some of Graham's other books.
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I have a bit of antipathy towards the Kennedy family for various reasons, so I didn't expect to enjoy this book half as much as I eventually did. It flew along, with warm cosy narrative that sucked you into the mid 20th century East Coast world of this startlingly dysfunctional family. In this particular version of the Kennedy story the narrator, Nora, is the lynchpin of the clan, not the matriarch Rose, and she brings a humanity to the Kennedy story that I didn't anticipate. It was definitely a two-in-the-morning read for me.
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews

click to open popover