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Imagine: How Creativity Works Hardcover – 19 Apr 2012

3.2 out of 5 stars 95 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Canongate Books; Main edition (19 April 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 184767786X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1847677860
  • Product Dimensions: 16.4 x 2.7 x 21.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (95 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 415,857 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

"Imagine should appeal to everyone, not just because of Lehrer's compelling writing style but also because it puts paid to the idea that creativity is a gift enjoyed only by the lucky few. We can all be more creative, we just need to know how. This book will show you" (New Scientist)

"This is an inspiring and engaging book that reveals creativity as less a sign of rare genius than a natural human potential" (Economist)

"Jonah Lehrer's new book confirms what his fans have known all along - that he knows more about science than a lot of scientists and more about writing than a lot of writers'" (Malcolm Gladwell, author of The Tipping Point)

"Jonah Lehrer may be the most talented explainer of science that we've got. His engrossing investigation of creativity and its source makes Imagine his best book yet" (Joshua Foer, author of Moonwalking with Einstein)

"Not many writers can make plausible links among musicians Bob Dylan, Yo-Yo Ma and David Byrne, animators at Pixar, neuroscientists at MIT, an amateur bartender in New York, entrepreneurs in Silicon Valley and Israeli army reservists . . . But Jonah Lehrer is such a writer-reporter, who weaves compelling and surprising connections based on detailed investigation and deep understanding . . . Reading his book exercises the imagination; the rest is up to us" (Washington Post)

"Lehrer is a thrilling multifaceted narrator...what Lehrer achieves in this book is a roaming yet cohesive description of the creative process, applied across disciplines" (Observer)

"An ecumenical hodgepodge of sociology, neuroscience and motivational examples that should be read by anyone with an interest in how human creativity works" (Kevin Power Sunday Business Post)

"Lehrer unpicks the triggers that bring about bouts of creativity, be it Bob Dylan's writing or an engineer inventing the Post-it note. It could improve your chances of coming up with an idea of your own" (Esquire Magazine)

"The must-read book of the year for chief executives and wannabe entrepreneurs everywhere, a modern business bible for the enlightened boss" (Murad Ahmed The Times)

"This compelling discussion of the creative process speaks to our scientific age" (Stephen Cave Financial Times)

"Imagine: how creativity works moves engagingly between cutting-edge neuroscience and cultural sociology. It offers a double-sided portrait of invention and discovery" (Boyd Tonkin Independent)

"If all science books were as successful in bridging the divide between art and science as this one is, there would no longer be a divide to bridge" (Ian Critchley Sunday Times)

"[A] fascinating study of the mind" (Word Magazine)

"A snappy, sassy tour d'horizon of the state of the science of creativity" (New Statesman)

"Lehrer pulls together a startling array of research and creative practise that challenges much of our current teaching methods, school organisation and even national educational policy" (Times Education Supplement)

Book Description

Where does creativity come from? And how do you harness it?

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
The writing style is fast paced; it's an easy read. Unfortunately, it's also not a challenging read. And worse, it becomes annoying. I got annoyed at the sweeping general statements like the number of patents awarded in New York City being higher than elsewhere, showing the creativity level of cities to be so much higher than towns or countryside. The simple (unstated) fact is IBM gets almost as many patents as pretty much everyone else combined every year. And IBM is everywhere. However, its patent attorneys are in New York, so guess where the patents get filed? It's not that New Yorkers are madly patenting everything in sight; it's that the corporate lawyers take over from the scientists in California and Texas and upstate New York. Furthermore, the business of the density of cities being such a boost to creativity is totally bogus. If it were true, then Mexico City would be a hotbed. Djakarta would be a positive blur, and Gaza would be paradise. But the simple fact is, it's New York. New York is the most livable, most highly functioning, productive - and yes creative - city in the world. And you cannot generalize from New York. It's unique.
The whole business of improv being a groupthink creativity machine is also way too general. Had Lehrer spent any time with the real masters of the art - Jonathan Winters, Robin Williams - his chapter would have looked a lot different. Individuals can be at least as creative as groups. There is no silver bullet, no yellow brick road. Lehrer has not discovered anything here.
The farther I read, the faster I read, because the content got to be repetitive and predictable - and less, shall we say - creative.
So it's not the best thing since sliced bread, but it is entertaining. There are lots of stories of artists and scientists. And it is fast paced.
A mixed bag is the best I can say.
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Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
An interesting look at the mysterious process of creativity, supported by lots of case studies from both the arts and industry, this is a useful addition to the growing library of books about the creative process. It's let down slightly by its inelegant, simplistic American writing style, and by its reliance on brain scans to support some of its findings; scans which seem to be everywhere right now, but which, even neuroscientists admit, are extremely crude, and which one suspects may be looked back on by future generations rather as phrenology is regarded now.

Its basic findings - things like the fact that daydreaming is important, that moments of insight often follow long periods of feeling 'stuck' and that mixing with others can stimulate new ideas - are hardly groundbreaking; nor are they as conclusive, or as supported by science, as Lehrer suggests. As with most popular science books, the case is simplified and overstated. However, 'Imagine' is still an accessible read, and those engaged in the production of new ideas, whether artistically or commercially, may well find parts of it insightful.
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Format: Hardcover
The writing style is fast paced; it's an easy read. Unfortunately, it's also not a challenging read. And worse, it becomes annoying. I got annoyed at the sweeping general statements like the number of patents awarded in New York City being higher than elsewhere, showing the creativity level of cities to be so much higher than towns or countryside. The simple (unstated) fact is IBM gets almost as many patents as pretty much everyone else combined every year. And IBM is everywhere. However, its patent attorneys are in New York, so guess where the patents get filed? It's not that New Yorkers are madly patenting everything in sight; it's that the corporate lawyers take over from the scientists in California and Texas and upstate New York. Furthermore, the business of the density of cities being such a boost to creativity is totally bogus. If it were true, then Mexico City would be a hotbed. Djakarta would be a positive blur, and Gaza would be paradise. But the simple fact is, it's New York. New York is the most livable, most highly functioning, productive - and yes creative - city in the world. And you cannot generalize from New York. It's unique.
The whole business of improv being a groupthink creativity machine is also way too general. Had Lehrer spent any time with the real masters of the art - Jonathan Winters, Robin Williams - his chapter would have looked a lot different. Individuals can be at least as creative as groups. There is no silver bullet, no yellow brick road. Lehrer has not discovered anything here.
The farther I read, the faster I read, because the content got to be repetitive and predictable - and less, shall we say - creative.
So it's not the best thing since sliced bread, but it is entertaining. There are lots of stories of artists and scientists. And it is fast paced.
A mixed bag is the best I can say.
Comment 21 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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By FLB TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 20 Aug. 2012
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
This is it, my first ever one star review, I did enjoy this book and read it to see if I could be creative, something I have never been. What makes Sir Jonathan Ive so great at Apple that I couldn't do the same.

I am saddened and hence the one star, appalled to hear that the writer has admitted to falsifying some of the quotes in the book, using the premise that a chain is only as strong as the weakest link, I cannot recommend this book.
2 Comments 14 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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