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Igboland by [Gardiner, Jeff]
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Igboland Kindle Edition

4.5 out of 5 stars 16 customer reviews

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Product Description

About the Author

Jeff Gardiner is a British author who was born in Jos, Nigeria, lived for many years in West London but now lives in Sussex. He also has a great passion for rock music and films.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 694 KB
  • Print Length: 358 pages
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
  • Publisher: Crooked Cat Publishing Ltd (14 Feb. 2014)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00IGQPG1S
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars 16 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #543,370 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This was an excellent read! I like to learn something new in a novel and Igboland gave me lots to think about. The political struggles in Africa, especially in Nigeria, are displayed in Igboland from the viewpoint of a white woman who is essentially there on her missionary husband’s visa. It’s easy to sympathise with Lydia and sense her insecurity as she settles into her role in a life which would be daunting for anyone, never mind when the land is in the turmoil of recently launched civil war. In some ways, it’s especially so for a young, recently married woman who has been brought up in quite straight-laced circumstances. Growing up in a strongly Methodist family the expectations put upon Lydia seem quite demanding, the ‘freedoms’ of the later 1960s almost bypassing her. Clem, her husband, isn’t a character I particularly warm to, but the portrayal of him is consistent in that he remains loyal to Lydia, in his own fashion. I find it entirely believable that Lydia falls in love with another though whether or not Clem also does is left more to the imagination. The tragic aspects are quite gut-wrenching; decisions made for Lydia rather than her needing to choose for herself. (I hate spoilers in reviews, so I am remaining vague over details in the book which may also have you reaching for a tissue, or a drink to ease a parched throat). It’s definitely a book I can recommend… and for those who love reading African history, a book to add to your shelves!
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Such an interesting book, offering an insight into the turmoil of the Biafran war of the 1960's through the eyes of Lydia, a naive English girl. Alongside the bloody fighting, the young missionary couple attempt to teach and heal, but while a story of love unfolds across the races, Lydia's faith falters. The book grew on me as I read on, and the ending of this sensitively written story is remarkably credible and satisfying.
There are questions available for Book Clubs, and extracts from the diary of the author's mother, although Jeff Gardiner emphasises that this is a novel, and NOT the real story of his missionary parents in Nigeria.
Through the freedom of fiction, a number of issues are tactfully aired and addressed. An immensely worthwhile read.
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Format: Paperback
In full disclosure, I was the editor on this project, not that it needed much editing.

Jeff Gardiner tells a tale here which has haunted me since working on it. It is such a beautiful story, well researched, enchanting, heartbreaking and uplifting.

I am proud to have worked on this book - I think everyone should read it, and I think it would be great as a film.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Igboland is set during the Nigerian civil war in the late sixties and told through the story of a British missionary wife. It deals with difficult themes: interracial attraction, the clashing and mixing of utterly different cultures, the tension inherent in the post-colonial relationship between the west and Africa, and between rival tribal loyalties within Africa itself. These are handled skilfully and sensitively, and the novel manages to be educating and thought provoking without ever letting this get in the way of the story, which weaves together the lives of its well-drawn and sympathetic characters in intricate and often exciting ways. A very good book.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Igboland is a tender portrayal of change and growth, set in Nigeria, during the Biafran War. From ripples of uncertainty to scenes of devastation and despair, the civil war erupts currents of social unrest, as the missionaries encounter, and even fall prey to becoming, its victims. Social unease is delicately reflected in the spiritual dialogue, relationships and experiences of the key characters, whose resilience, often inspired by the suffering they encounter, allows them to evolve and unite on a level that reflects their personal growth. The sensitive interweaving of spiritual, personal and political issues invites comparison between British and Nigerian cultures, without forcing harmony where differences and questions remain. In the same vein, though characters exit ‘hand-in-hand’, the complexity of their relationship is not veiled, as the ‘formal end’ of the civil war leaves the country in chaos and bloodshed, rather than an over-simplified phoenix-style reconstruction. Poignant, yet uplifting, this novel opens the mind to ourselves and the world beyond.
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Format: Kindle Edition
This fascinating story charts the experience of Lydia, the young and naïve wife of a Christian missionary, Clem, after they are sent to Nigeria during the Biafran War of Independence in order to spread their religious message. Initially shocked by the type of life she is expected to live in this seemingly hostile environment, she comes to embrace her time in West Africa, and it changes her in ways she could never have imagined possible.

The book is told through Lydia’s eyes, and as a result some of the events do seem to be simplified and glossed over somewhat. Despite being set during quite a bloody conflict, the political situation is only touched on slightly, and often as a result of information that Lydia is sent from her family back in England. Whilst frustrating, as I did want to hear more of the implications of the war, it did reflect the fact that she is cut off from society in the Nigerian village they were living in, and information was very hard to come by, and therefore did not seem like an oversight by the author.

Some of the traditions of the Igbo culture are beautifully explained, and the book as a whole does really highlight the triumph of human spirit in the face of adversity. I really do recommend this as an extremely enjoyable read.
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