£12.08
  • RRP: £12.99
  • You Save: £0.91 (7%)
FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 7 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
The Idiot (Everyman's Lib... has been added to your Basket
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Idiot (Everyman's Library CLASSICS) Hardcover – 25 Apr 2002

4.0 out of 5 stars 13 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£12.08
£6.63 £9.56
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more

Top Deals in Books
See the latest top deals in Books. Shop now
£12.08 FREE Delivery in the UK. Only 7 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Frequently Bought Together

  • The Idiot (Everyman's Library CLASSICS)
  • +
  • The Brothers Karamazov (Everyman's Library Classics)
  • +
  • Crime And Punishment (Everyman's Library Classics)
Total price: £38.27
Buy the selected items together

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.



Top Deals in Books
See the latest top deals in Books. Shop now

Product details

  • Hardcover: 680 pages
  • Publisher: Everyman (25 April 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1857152549
  • ISBN-13: 978-1857152548
  • Product Dimensions: 13.6 x 3.6 x 21.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 62,158 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

About the Author

Fyodor Dostoyevsky was born in Moscow in 1821. He died in 1881 having written some of the most celebrated works in the history of literature, including Crime and Punishment, The Idiot, and The Brothers Karamazov. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

By L. Otto VINE VOICE on 31 Aug. 2011
Format: Hardcover
Through nobodys fault but my own, I'm not nearly as well-read as I would like to be, but in the interest of changing that I decided to give Dostoevsky a go, The Idiot being my choice.

Firstly, I should warn you that this book is a commitment. To some, that may not be a problem, and they would laugh that this is 'light reading'. Honestly, each to their own, but for myself (a 23 year old with a fairly average attention span) I found myself struggling from time to time on the 620-or-so pages, not including the supplementary pages. I should note, however, that my difficulty is not a fault of the book (which is beautifully written) becoming dull, but rather of my own inability to really focus on text for great lengths. If you just had a feeling that you're quite similar to me in that respect, then I'm here to tell you: Give it a go. I finished it (albeit after three of four attempts) but on my final attempt I was so glad that I gave the book the attention it deserves.

On a side note, you might also resemble me in the sense that you don't read the prologues, introductions, or supplementary information. For this book, by Richard Pevear, please do. It adds a dimension to the novel that would otherwise be missed. I should note, however, that if you are an expert in Russian history, or a specialist in that field, you may be forgiven for ignoring much of the links as you will already know it, however for the general public, this would not be the case!

The character development is fantastic, and you really care for all (well, most, there are a few characters that I really wanted to just disappear!) of the characters, and their individual webs of thought. It is both a tragedy, and a comedy, and a philosophy lesson, and a most-worthwhile read.

My review isn't incredibly specific, I realise, but I hope that it gives you a different perspective, and perhaps entices you to give this masterpiece a shot!
Comment 20 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
Dostoyevsky regarded this as a sort of funny tragedy while he was writing it, but strangely very few others have viewed it as anything other than a tragic novel. Maybe it's an epilepsy thing, but once you get the trick of seeing the world of this novel both through the Prince's eyes and through the eyes of the characters around him then it really comes alive, and the shimmering fugue state which is the artistic marvel of this book will make you laugh like nothing else. To me this is Dostoyevsky's (the greatest dramatic novelist) finest dramatic achievement; to describe one world and then let the characterizations create multiple worlds within that. Of course we have to creatively empathise with the characters to be able to see the drama and the comedy, but doesn't this, as Dostoyevsky hoped, constitute the highest form of realism? Isn't everyday life delineated by the extent of our empathy? This is really what the book is about, the prince is set free by his isolation and sickness to a Christlike empathy with the world around him (although the brilliantly chaotic character of Lebedev tests the limits of this), and to see the destructive limitations of the egoism and narrow selfish passion which animate 'Society'. Of course the results of his efforts to make a difference are usually tragic or ridiculous. But it's the sometimes demonic laughter which surrounds the truly beautiful 'soul' of this book which makes it a uniquely unnerving and multi-dimensional masterpiece.
Comment 12 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
The Idiot is one of the finest novels in history, perhaps the finest. In this novel, the enigma that is often referred to as "THE RUSSIAN SOUL" is variously dissected through the different characters and more so by the hero of the story Prince Myshkin. In its simplest explanation, it is a soul with good intentions but faulty in executing the intentions. It is a soul in conflict, driven by the zest for life and a search of its meaning. Certainly the most Christian of Dostoyevsky's novels, THE IDIOT portrays how disastrous a good life can be. Rich in characters, this classic centers mostly on the good Prince Myshkin, a recovering epileptic with a rich soul who is easily perceived as an 'idiot' by the casual observer who focuses on his childlike manners especially in expressing himself and his naivety in dealing with people. But then a closer look reveals that his manners are the reflections of his honest soul, the wealth of his big heart and the broadness of his mind.

And only in deeper engagements does it become evident that Myshkin however has superior understanding and expression, which makes him modest and intelligent rather than stupid. His simple, honest and decent life is succinctly conveyed in his interactions, generating both love and resentment. The saintly Myshkin however struggles to deal with a materialistic world which has no place for the virtuous, and to reconcile his passionate and compassionate love for two women. But the love of the women corrupt and drives men out of their minds. Nastasia Filipovna whom Myshkin has compassionate love for is a tormented soul that can only love Christ and in Myshkin she found that Christ-like figure.
Read more ›
Comment 23 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
It is not my intention here to review this novel itself, except to say that despite being in some ways difficult, mainly due to the extreme volatility and complex interactions of the main protagonists, which are not always easy to interpret, I found this to be a great work of literature. The book is powerful, dark and multi-layered – full of intelligence, wit, pathos and insights into humanity and personal motivations. A disturbing, memorable and great work.

Instead, I want to focus on the translation. Over the last few weeks I have now read the book twice, in two different translations. First that by Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky (known rather tweely in the trade as P&V) and afterwards the Oxford Classics one by Alan Myers. The difference could not be more stark. Quite simply, the P&V one is appalling. I was nearly put off Dostoevsky for life, and I fear my wife has been (we were both reading this for a book club). I am well aware that Dostoevsky has an often quirky style of writing in the original, but I could not believe that he was really as clumsy as this. The P&V rendering is frequently clunky and disjointed and full of word choices which simply do not ring true or make sense in the English language. They have a veritable mania for using the words “finally” and “definitively” over and over, and there are clearly plain errors of translation. For example, after one epileptic seizure the protagonist, Prince Myshkin, is pronounced to be generally feeling himself again, apart from a case of “hypochondria”. Myers sensibly translates this instead as a sense of “mild depression”. As the father of someone who has suffered from epilepsy for 36 years, I can assure P&V that hypochondria is not a well-known post-ictal side-effect.
Read more ›
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Look for similar items by category


Feedback