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Ices: The Definitive Guide Paperback – 31 Jul 1995

4.5 out of 5 stars 24 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 192 pages
  • Publisher: Grub Street; New edition edition (31 July 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1898697264
  • ISBN-13: 978-1898697268
  • Product Dimensions: 21.1 x 25 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (24 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 344,193 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is what it says: definitive, but delightfully so. There is barely an ingredient that does not have its own recipe: multiple, subtly different, versions from the old favourites - vanilla (9), chocolate (17) and strawberry (4) - to the exotic: gin and tonic, lychee and lime or rosewater sorbets; saffron, green tea or avocado ice-creams. No better recipes exist anywhere for the ultimate expresso coffee or brown bread ice-creams (I've had my share of disasters at both until I got this book). Alcohol in ice-cream is well explained, as are all the underlying scientific dimensions to freezing different types of mixture to create a perfectly balanced texture: neither grainy nor watery. There is a thoroughly researched and fascinating history of ice-cream making from the 18th Century, and of selling ice-creams in places as diverse as Glasgow, Paris and Baltimore. All ingredients and recipes are 'translated' for those ice-cream aficionados on both sides of the Atlantic to have no trouble making - whether your taste is for Cornish clotted cream, Scottish rhubarb or English stilton; or dulce de leche, spiced pumpkin or tequila,; whether you buy 'whipped' or 'heavy' cream, and use quarts or litres. More global ices are also well represented: a fail-safe kulfi, an excellent halva and a mai tai sorbet are examples. Over 200 recipes, and each one works a treat. This book is an ice-cream lover's ideal bedtime reading: a host of heavenly recipes to dream of, and then make and enjoy. Everyone with an ice-cream maker should buy this book; but all recipes explain how they can be made without. My most indispensible specialist food cook book, and possibly even the one book I'd take to my Desert Island on the grounds that if you can't have ice-cream you can at least think about it.
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Format: Paperback
After the purchase of my new ice cream maker, I started to look around for some good books to get me going.
Most of the ice cream guides are slim volumes and packed with lots of full page colour photos - what a waste of money!

Ices:the Definitive Guide is drab by comparison but instead your money is spent on terrific and thorough content. Fully researched, well organised and covering all aspects, historical, technical and practical, this book is the launching pad for any competent ice cream and sorbet chef.
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Format: Paperback
Since I bought this book three years ago, I have discovered an endless flow of wonderful recipes. I decided three years ago that I would make one recipe a week. In this way I would try out all of them in about four years. However, it has not turned out quite that way. The recipes are so good I keep returning to my favourite ones. One thing is for sure my friends adore it....
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Format: Paperback
As a trade association for those who make a living from making ice cream, it is not for us to encourage individuals to make ice cream at home, but we risk recommending this book because of the content covering the history of ice cream. Robin is a renowned ice cream historian and this book contains much original research which for one, explodes the myth that Marco Polo introduced ice cream to Europe from China. In fact, the book claims that Sinologists now believe he never even went to China! Alongside the history, there are many tips on ice cream production which are useful to the amateur, but also to the artisan professional. The book is well worth the money and contains a very varied and valuable amount of information for anyone interested in ice cream.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Warning, this book does not contain any photographs. However, it does contain a wealth of period illustrations around the topic of ice cream, including a very interesting history of ice cream.

The book is well-written and its language is easy-going, but precise in descriptions, without being patronising.

Recipes are described in great detail and measurements are given in metric, US and imperial sizes. The book also gives many alternatives to ingredients, if the required ones cannot be found and there is even a more detailed section about the main ingredients to ice cream.

At the end, there is a section that explains (scientifically) how ice creams actually becomes ice cream, with the aim to enable you to make your own recipes by getting the balance right.

Recipes range from classics to very exotic mixes. And yes, there are a lot of them!

Overall a really great book I can recommend warmly. Only its organisation is a bit tricky, so use the index if you can (which is good).
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Format: Paperback
I don't usually trust anything that calls itself indispensible or definitive, but this book really is, if you want to make a range of ice creams, sorbets, spooms, and the rest. Not only does it have the widest and most imaginative range of recipes I've seen in an ice cream book, but it's also a wealth of ice cream history and lore, and contains lots of amusing illustrations of historical tools, ice cream cartoons, and wonderful 19th century ice cream feasts. A lot of the recipes are also quite historical - the Victorians had very way-out ideas about what to put in their ices!

I've tried maybe 1/3 of these so far, and virtually all of them so far work nicely. You don't need a machine, but it makes things easier. I really like all the various fruit sorbet recipes, but some of the traditional custard-based ones are just superb - honey ice cream springs to mind. The one I've had most compliments on, however, is an incredibly fragrant sorbet made with tinned lychees!
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