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The Ice Man: Confessions of a Mafia Contract Killer Paperback – 23 May 2013

4.5 out of 5 stars 319 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 528 pages
  • Publisher: Mainstream Publishing (23 May 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1780576587
  • ISBN-13: 978-1780576589
  • Product Dimensions: 12.7 x 3.3 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (319 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 163,133 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

"A dramatic biography . . . uncovers Kuklinski's trail of blood in terrifying graphic detail" (News of the World)

"With brutal honesty, Carlo writes from the heart" (Robert De Niro on Philip Carlo's work)

Book Description

The harrowing biography of one of America's most high-profile assassins

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Got this book as a gift a few months ago.
Finally got round to reading it, and what a read!

It's a must for true crime readers. Personally I doubt if I ever read about an individual so gruesome and cold-blooded.

After finishing the book, I watched the interviews Kuklinski gave from prison, he seemed to be an intelligent and articulate guy, though it made him even more scary!

I'd recommend this book to anyone who likes reading about real life murders.
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Format: Paperback
Having read this a couple of times, and cross-referenced it with other Mafia books I have, I am pretty convinced that this tale isn't true.

Undoubtedly Kuklinski was a bad guy who killed people, but the big mafia hits he claimed to have been involved with - up to and including Jimmy Hoffa - do not, on examination, stand up.

The book is compelling. If you are into crime, it neatly straddles the serial killer genre with the organised crime genre. Those who like reading about Ted Bundy are happy; those who like reading about Carlo Gambino are happy, but there are too many holes in this thing and, after reflection, it annoys. Every traffic misdemeanour turns into mass murder. I want the author to actually do some research. If you've got four guys dead because they cut Richard up and wanted to take him apart, who were they? When did it happen?

There was one incident when Kuklinski, to make 'his Mafia bones,' shoots some dog-walker in the back of the head, but this is not followed up. Surely a pedestrian shot in the head in a residential street in New York could be cross-referenced.

Killers lie. Henry Lee Lucas showed that. Even if they come across as taciturn and, perversely, decent, they lie. Kuklinski seems to have lied. Every Mafia hit short of JFK, he was the button man. I think not.

Philip Carlo spends too much time looking at the causes of the ice man - terrible childhood, unfocussed rage - and not enough journalistic detachment to what the guy claimed.

Look, this is fascinating, a glimpse of Hell, but is it true? I don't think so.
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Format: Paperback
A Book that is superbly written. Each page engrosses you more which has you not only trying to comprehend each stage of this man's life, but looking for where each 'story' ends up. You quickly find out that it always ends in murder, but the comprehension this man had for life was not only nil, but stalking out his victims were which was once a game for him, became a profession for him & one he was extremely proficient at. I would like to think that Richard Kuklinski is a one off & books like this will not be seen again. This book is absolutely gripping.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I really didn't like this book at all, especially the way that the author seemed to glorify the subjects evil deeds, many of which are probably not true. I mean how can you trust the word of a self confessed career criminal who murders, sometimes for the sheer joy of it.
Furthermore I couldn't believe Philip Carlo' s final words of the book. Rest in peace Richard Leonard Kuklinski. No! Rot in hell Kuklinski, but let's hope that the innocent victims that he killed, just to test new ways of killing, or because he didn't like their driving, do rest in peace.
My advice is don't waste over £5 on this badly written rubbish. If you have a morbid fascination for this type of thing, you can watch the HBO tapes of him on YouTube for free.
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Format: Paperback
This book follows the rise and fall of Richard Kulkinski nicknamed the "Ice Man", who claims to have killed over 200 people during 30 years of violence in which he claims to be intimately inolved in the killing of Jimmy Hoffa.

From the very outset, this book sets out to shock and is definitely a harrowing, yet somehow absorbing true life account of a psychopath who suffered immeasureably during his childhood at the hands of abusive parents, something which no doubt deepend his psychosis and shaped him into the monster he became.

Philip Carlo talks of Rich's callous attitude and detatchment toward emotion, how he has no feeling or concept of human suffering. The insight into the mind of a man who feels nothing and thinks nothing of killing someone who merely cuts him up or throws him the finger, who can descend into a mindless rage at whim, inflicting brutal beatings on his wife makes this a chilling, disturbing tale.

But as absorbing as this book is, there is somewhat a feel of deja vu when reading. Philip Carlo often hammers the point home regarding Rich's remorselessnes over and over again. The pleasure Richard got from torturing his victims, of devising new and grisly ways to make his "marks" suffer - the way he liked to be up close and personal and see the life fade from their eyes. Philip Carlo obviously wants us to truly understand how monsterous this man was - but the point is made too often, and becomes actually quite tiresome. Philip's accounts, gathered from over two hundred hours of interviewing and the way the killings come about give us this distinct impression in any case, so there really wasn't a need to reiterate the point as often as it was.
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