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How Will You Measure Your Life? Hardcover – 15 May 2012

4.3 out of 5 stars 39 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 240 pages
  • Publisher: HarperBusiness (15 May 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0062102419
  • ISBN-13: 978-0062102416
  • Product Dimensions: 14 x 2.2 x 21 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (39 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 867,023 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

"[A] highly engaging and intensely revealing work....Spiritual without being preachy, this work is especially relevant for young people embarking on their career, but also useful for anyone who wants to live a more meaningful life in accordance with their values."--Publishers Weekly

"The book encapsulates Christensen's best advice to keep high achievers from being disrupted in their own lives....[P]rovocative but reassuring: Peter Drucker meets Mitch Albom."--Bloomberg Businessweek

"[M]ore genuinely a self-help book than the genre it disparages. Instead of force-feeding readers with orders on how to improve, it aims to give them the tools to set their own course"--Financial Times

."..a gripping personal story with lessons from business mixed in."--Bloomberg BusinessWeek

."..Clayton Christensen's new book has the business world buzzing."--Deseret News

"[W]ell researched and thought through material.--Forbes

"Recommend the book to friends and family who have no connection to the business world. They will thank you for it."--Harvard Business Review

''A Business Student's New Required Reading''--Huffington Post

"[R]evealing and profound."--Inc. Magazine

"I wish this book was around when I started my carreer. I bought copies for my kids and other young adults I know. $16 is not a lot to spend to get them thinking about their future and how to live responsible, ethical and successful lives."--Small Business Labs

..".a gripping personal story with lessons from business mixed in."--Bloomberg BusinessWeek

..".Clayton Christensen's new book has the business world buzzing."--Deseret News

[A] highly engaging and intensely revealing work .Spiritual without being preachy, this work is especially relevant for young people embarking on their career, but also useful for anyone who wants to live a more meaningful life in accordance with their values. --Publishers Weekly"

The book encapsulates Christensen s best advice to keep high achievers from being disrupted in their own lives....[P]rovocative but reassuring: Peter Drucker meets Mitch Albom. --Bloomberg Businessweek"

[M]ore genuinely a self-help book than the genre it disparages. Instead of force-feeding readers with orders on how to improve, it aims to give them the tools to set their own course --Financial Times"

[W]ell researched and thought through material.--Forbes"

a gripping personal story with lessons from business mixed in. --Bloomberg BusinessWeek"

Clayton Christensen s new book has the business world buzzing. --Deseret News"

Recommend the book to friends and family who have no connection to the business world. They will thank you for it. --Harvard Business Review"

A Business Student s New Required Reading --Huffington Post"

[R]evealing and profound. --Inc. Magazine"

I wish this book was around when I started my carreer. I bought copies for my kids and other young adults I know. $16 is not a lot to spend to get them thinking about their future and how to live responsible, ethical and successful lives. --Small Business Labs"

From the Back Cover

In 2010 world-renowned innovation expert Clayton M. Christensen gave a powerful speech to the Harvard Business School's graduating class. Drawing upon his business research, he offered a series of guidelines for finding meaning and happiness in life. He used examples from his own experiences to explain how high achievers can all too often fall into traps that lead to unhappiness.

The speech was memorable not only because it was deeply revealing but also because it came at a time of intense personal reflection: Christensen had just overcome the same type of cancer that had taken his father's life. As Christensen struggled with the disease, the question "How do you measure your life?" became more urgent and poignant, and he began to share his insights more widely with family, friends, and students.

In this groundbreaking book, Christensen puts forth a series of questions: How can I be sure that I'll find satisfaction in my career? How can I be sure that my personalrelationships become enduring sources of happiness? How can I avoid compromising my integrity and stay out of jail? Using lessons from some of the world's greatest businesses, he provides incredible insights into these challenging questions.

How Will You Measure Your Life? is full of inspiration and wisdom, and will help students, midcareer professionals, and parents alike forge their own paths to fulfillment."

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
A professor of business studies applies his learning and knowledge to the question 'how should we lead our lives?. He is, incidentally, a deeply religious person (a Mormon) and so is very interested in that question anyway.

The book starts from the observation that many colleagues who should have led deeply fulfilling lives have failed to do so. And asks why? We start with some truths that are very elegantly expressed and illustrated that will remain in the memory. First there's the pursuit of money, when this is really a 'hygiene' factor rather than a goal worth pursuing in its own right. Then there's material on the balance to be struck between planned strategies and the opportunities that arise serendipitously - you need to plan, but to be open to experience. Then there's the vexed question of prioritisation and incentives - your prioritisation is shown through your behaviour (what goods do you sell for preference if you are a salesman? what time do you leave the office?) - and your prioritisation reflects your incentives (what does your company reward you to sell?)

The next section, based on the author's knowledge of disruptive innovation, I found the most revealing - you need to invest in new ideas at the right time (you need to invest in your children at the right time), and not throw cash in large measure at it too late. You need to ask yourself about products 'what job are they doing for you?' (and ask 'what job is school doing for your children?' If the answer is 'making them feel successful' realise what the other ways to do this are. Just as if you design a milkshake which people drink in their cars on their commute to the office realise that the rivals are doughnuts, bagels etc as well as other milkshakes).
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is a wonderful book - an intelligent, thought provoking read which takes the key theories of Harvard Business School, reviews them through brief but illuminating business case studies, and then goes on to apply them to the lessons of life outside of work and business as well.

A great little business book - it should be given that it is co authored by 3 people strongly connected with HBS - and a book which is guaranteed to make you think about how well you make the allocation of your resources - your skills, talents, money and time - align with what is truly important to you and the kind of person you would like to be though of as being.

The authors make clear why so many people who are very successful in their careers have not always created the same success in their personal lives. It certainly made me think, and I hope will stay with me as I try to learn and to apply the lessons.

This is not a sanctimonious or preachy book at all. It is smart, clear, practical and very readable with lots of valuable insights into life and business

Highly recommended
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
If huge companies such as HMV and Blockbuster can fail, how can we ensure that our own projects in life don't fail as well? Management expert Clayton Christensen, helped by journalist Karen Dillon and former student James Allworth, is pretty sure that we can achieve huge success in our lives if we learn some simple principles - and their case is very convincing. For a start, many of the newspapers and other organisations which are failing today did not invest in their future and wrote the internet off as a game-changer. Their narrow-mindedness came back at them with a vengeance. If we are not to share that fate, we individuals need to be constantly testing our assumptions against reality and we would benefit from setting out our own mission statements and measuring ourselves against it. We should be careful about outsourcing the care of our children to child minders and other teachers and filling up their days with hours of classes. The most valuable lessons are the simple ones about problem-solving, being self-reliant and having the satisfaction of achieving things ourselves. We teach these things to our kids by spending time with them (and showing them how to mend their clothes or make a cake), rather than outsourcing their care through weekends full of horse-riding and swimming classes. I have read dozens of self-help books and this ranks right at the top.
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By Stephen Green TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 28 Aug. 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I bought this book having had it on my wish list for some time and thought I was in for a real treat as I began reading the early pages. Here was somebody of talent and proven ability (assuming Harvard are still recruiting top people) who writes in a friendly down to earth way, with words that are accessible to us mere mortals. He told a tale of his university reunions where gradually the lives of these gifted people began tailing off, after early career and material success. An Enron executive, one of his contemporaries went to jail, something apparently unrecognisable from his early character. Others had failed marriages and ruined relationships with their children. The author says that the book is co-written by a talented hi-flying Australian called James Allworth and Karen Dillon "one of the world's most inspiring women". The author reveals that he is suffering from a rare type of cancer that prematurely ended his father's life. The author says that he is going to deliver an explanation of how high-fliers get derailed and fail to live up to their promise or leave a great legacy. With the life he has lived I awaited great wisdom and life experience. The author has written 11 previous books, so with Harper Collins as the publisher as well, what can possibly go wrong?

If you think that the criticisms I am about to make are unfair or unnecessary, let me first say that his is not half the book it could have and should have been. My desire is to lead people to the better authors, the relevant and the worthy and the right choices of whatever the reader is ready for. I want to lead you into further reading and steer you away from what I consider to be wrong choices. However, despite what I am about to write, others will have different views, so make up your own mind.
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