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on 26 June 1998
After a frustrating first year of teaching at a junior high school, I was about ready to give up the teaching career all together. I picked up this book one evening because I liked the cartoon drawings in it (it looked like it would be fun to read). I couldn't put it down. I learned so many things that I cannot wait to use my second year of teaching. I especially appreciated the chapter on praising children. I never realized what a negative impact that too "straight-forward" praise (such as "You're so smart!") could have on a student. Now I look back when I was a kid, and I hated it when people would constantly say that to me, because I always felt like, "okay, i'm smart....so what?" I thought I wouldn't be allowed to make a mistake. Those types of teachers that would say things like, "oh, don't worry about that assignment/paper/project...you are smart..you can do it," well, that didn't make me feel any better. The best teachers I had were the ones that gave me specific examples of things that I was doing right in class.
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on 27 April 1998
We,parents are often overwhelmed with the responsibilites of raising the sweet things we call our children. We make it throught the strain of the sleepless years, the toddler tantrums, the preschool whys and then we realize we cannot dump our kids off in school and sigh with relief. We need to encourage life long learning. It will never end! Well, Faber and Mazlish continue to outline in this book, simple, sensible, aproaches to problemsolving and esteem building that will invigorate a child's desire to learn. This book is a continuation of How To Talk So Kids Will Listen and Listen So Kids Will Talk. Getting away from the fussing, fighting and ranting with children becomes so easy when following their direct and simple outlines of how to carry on discussion. By encouraging active listening, the heart plays a bigger role in interacting with children than the sometimes ranting mouth. I highly recommend it !
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on 7 September 1998
One of the best books around to help teachers communicate better with children. Even though I bought this to help my teaching, I don't know how I would have made it through the last few years with my three young children without this book. The skills presented in this very readable book are very useful for improving classroom management too and helping children that live with a lot of stress especially in the urban environment. The clear and compelling anecdotes bring Faber and Mazlich's ideas to life!
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on 8 March 2015
At last a commonsense book on how to communicate with children. I have recommended it to all my friends/family. It is a must if you are in contact with children.
I am, at present, writing a book on how developing a child's confidence via the language we use, can reduce the prevalence of sexual abuse - and this supports everything I believe.
Instead of building a child's ability to trust its own instincts, we push our own interpretations of their experiences onto them. We bring children up to respect all adults particularly senior family members, we don't encourage them to say'no' us, we want them to be polite at all costs, we don't listen to them, we don't accept their perception of the world. we want them to obedient, we don't respect them as individuals but want them to respect us, we don't give them an adequate language about sex, we don't believe most of what they say - and then we wonder why they don't tell us when they've been abused! With the help of this book (and mine!) we can give our children healthy autonomy without anarchy and therefore reduce the prevalence of abuse of all kinds. Merely introducing the word 'uncomfortable' (as in 'Uncle Dan makes me feel uncomfortable when he cuddles me') into their vocabulary, is a good start.
THIS BOOK IS A MUST IF YOU ARE A PARENT, GRANDPARENT, TEACHER, AUNT, UNCLE, HUMAN. Buy it!
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on 7 February 2013
Would have given this 5 stars but for one thing...

This book was written in response to requests from the readers of 'How to Listen so Kids will Talk and Talk so Kids will Listen' and I am glad it was.It shows how the skills can be transfered into a different environment and all that entails. I read that book many years ago and it was refreshing to find a practical parenting book that fitted my ethos. I now watch my adult children and see the rewards of this work; they have absorbed the model they were brought up with, replaying it when they communicate with others, in a way so fluent in use. The book cannot take all the credit, but certainly a good proportion of it.

Now I work in school and was excited to see this 'Learn' version... "A must have", I thought. I am pleased with the purchase, but feel that readers would benefit most if they had already explored the other book as it gives a strong foundation to build on. That said, it is worth investing in both!
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on 16 February 2014
If you're a parent, a great idea, but How to talk so kids will listen... by the same authors , is really the book for you. If you are a teacher, this is DEFINITELY for you. Not for the fainthearted or for anyone whose heart is not into helping kids. My only real disappointment is that I can't find a copy in Italian for my children's teachers (we live in Italy). Ah well, perhaps I'll have to start translating it for them!
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on 9 August 2006
Adele Faber's "How to Talk So Kids Can Learn: At Home and in School" was something I picked it up for a casual browse and ended up reading it from cover to cover, because it's well written, illustrated with plenty of case histories and makes a lot of sense. It's also uproariously funny in places!

Note that I'm not speaking as a parent or teacher, but it sounded pretty good from a third party's point of view.
Interesting and eminently readable.
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on 19 November 2009
This book was excellent, full of great techniques to try which will help you to communicate effectively with children (small ones and teenagers) and strangely enough adults too. Makes you think about the way you phrase what you say so that you get the desired behaviour/responses from others. Well worth the money and useful for reference purposes again and again.
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on 17 October 2009
The format gives real-life examples and inspires the reader to improve their communication skills with children. I would argue that this book should be compulsory reading for all teachers and parents.
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on 19 May 2013
This is now the 3rd book I have read in this series in trying to work with difficult kids. Great tips and hints or what to do and say to help vulnerable and challenging kids. Ignore the americanisms (which can be a bit irksome) and take the advice of these very sensible ladies.
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