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How Not to Grow Up: A Coming of Age Memoir. Sort of. Paperback – 6 May 2010

3.9 out of 5 stars 110 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Ebury Press (6 May 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0091932084
  • ISBN-13: 978-0091932084
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 2 x 22.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (110 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 447,567 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product description

Review

"A thoroughly entertaining confessional... cheeky, self-deprecating and very human" (Metro)

"If you've ever secretly wondered when you're going to grow up, How Not To Grow Up is one for you..." (Lauren Laverne Grazia)

"Razor sharp and very funny" (Shortlist Magazine)

Book Description

The misadventures of an immature man in an adult world

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Richard Herring has co written some of the best comedy of the last 20 years but somehow misses completely with this book. I was left feeling a bit sad after reading it, i felt that this man was a bit of a git. Never ever meet your heros or in this case read about them. Most of the book is filled up with references to his sexual conquests all of which seem to make him whine a lot. To conceal the fact he is a fanny rat he sprinkles a bit of self loathing over each ancedote but still gives you the impression hes a ladies man on the sly. If fans are mentioned in the book then they are only done so based on how attractive they are to him. Most males in the book are seen as annoying competition and just in the way of any potential shag. I felt most sad when he was refering to fans who try and chat with him about his work, he seems to hold them with contempt unless of course they are pretty girls who are willing to nosh him off. The most annoying thing about this book is i still like his work he is a genuinely funny person though in real life is probably an arsehole. I suppose after 20 years in show biz you get a bit up yourself i just feel that its a shame he had to tell us about it.
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By Mr. M. A. Reed TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 26 April 2010
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Being a male of a 'certain age', that is, quite near the Dreaded 40 which Herring is so obviously fearing, "How Not To Grow Up" feels both like a very bad - and very good - situation comedy about middle age, and one of the greatest stand up sets of all time laid to print. The tales within are those of a minor mid-life cris, one that is instantly recognisable in the day and age where life doesn't get much better than it did when you were 20, when you still stuff your face with the crack cocaine of fried chicken with the man behind the counter who you see more often than your friends, and wonder where life went and what it is meant to be.

By the time you get to 40, you're meant to have it all worked out - where your life is going, what the purpose of it is, and probably settled down, married up, and bred - but life just doesn't always work out like that. (There is a plus side, Herring hasn't had a relationship longer than 2 years and that means he's never been divorced and never had to pay obscene amounts of money to an ex-wife, but that is hardly compensated by a life where your best friend is your DVD collection.. or is it?). Where this book differs from yoru standard run-of-the-mill Middle-Aged-Lad-Dad-Dick-Lit is that Herring has a moral compass, a context in which his mistakes are analysed and understood.

As most people never quite managed to live the life he has, and ended up accidentally a grown up with kids and a job, in one respect the self-imposed exile of indulgence sounds like a paradise when I, for example, have to battle a five year not to watch "Ben Ten And The Amazing Monsters" for the 3,742nd time in a day, there is also somewhat of a void, a lack of a narrative that provides a direction for the journey.
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Format: Paperback
Tawdry, embarrassing, poorly written and tedious. I have enjoyed Richard Herring's comedy over the years but can't help feeling he's been poorly advised over this self pitying attempt at a biography. The tales of his seedy sexual exploits with female fans young enough to be his daughter are actually quite nauseating, despite the self flagellation over them and overall Herring comes across as a really unpleasant and self obsessed character.
The last part of the book is given over to a drippy, overwritten account of his final salvation - falling in love. It's so incredibly awful, cliched, flowery and over written, that I kept waiting for a punchline that never came. Terrible.
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Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I have been a big fan of Danny Wallace's for some time, and when I saw this book, I thought i might in for more of the same.

And I nearly got it.

Richard is approaching 40- and is struggling. All his previous misdemeanors and success's- including fights and sexual conquests- are relived and analyzed in an attempt to hold back the time.

This is a funny book, with serious (and sometimes sad and thoughtful) conclusions. Richard is a more intellectual Danny Wallace, with bigger words and deeper meaning. He is more self introspective in this approach- and the book reaches a suitable ending.

Why not 5 stars? It does have an underlying theme of sadness and desperation which really makes you both feel for AND slap Richard. It's this slapping which stops it being a 5 star for me.

However, it is worth the money, and will make you think and laugh. Out loud. Especially the bit about his previous fights.

Oh go on, get it. You will end up comparing it against your life; and you know you will come out better off.
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Format: Paperback
...even if you're a big fan of richard herring. i went in to this as a long time fan of all his shows with stewart lee, his current standup and a (rapidly fading, it must be said) appreciation of his podcast with andrew collins.

it's a cliché that all good things must come to an end, and it seems richard herring is well on the slide from worthwhile, funny and satirical comedian into the boring, scatologically-obsessed joke he once parodied.

but clearly he believes he is being very clever at the same time. oh dear.

anyway, the book itself is written in a sickly child-like prose which becomes dull and irritating after a few chapters, while the self-aggrandising (but all the while insisting that they're self-deprecating) encounters are dull and not nearly as insight-worthy as the author seems to want us to think.

even the champagne-bottle-up-the-arse threesome moment was written so badly as to completely undermine the impact.

two stars (it isn't absolutely terrible, merely very bad) is a fair review for this product and unless you can get it for less than a pound, steer clear.
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