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on 7 December 2010
Many years ago the ground breaking sketch show Monty Python predicted the rise of the furry menace with a vignette titled "The Mouse Problem", but only now do we have a solution, a final solution provided by Nicole Cushing, with a modest nod to Swift; thin out their ranks by eating 'em.

Furries. You know, people who dress up as animals for various reasons, and not nessecarily because they fancy trying a few ideas from the Farma Sutra. Well, Cushing's reasonable response to their growing numbers is to farm them for food. Seems entirely ethical to me, until we can finally breed those Ameglian Major cows that enjoy being eaten. Come to think of it, Doug Adams WAS a very late Python writer wasn't he? He'd have enjoyed HTEFF, without a salmon of a doubt.

This feast is a "flying circus", a loosely connected series of bizarro skits whose weirdness is nicely tempered by a coherent mythology; a 70s TV show no-one remembers, a literal s**t storm, a war between the Flesh and the Flayed, the machinations of the Pseudo-Amish, and serious discussion of the methodology of farming people in fur suits are all thrown in the pot and seasoned liberally with satire. And it tastes good, just like the best of the old Python, though HTEFF is very much its own dish.

This is a short book, but it's got a lot of meat to it; its certainly enough of a meal that you probably shouldn't have that after dinner mint, even if it is "wafer thin."
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on 9 October 2011
"How to Eat Fried Furries" is just what it says on the unmarked tin. In this flying circus (a literary form conceived by Nicole Cushing and inspired by Bizarro's six grandpappies: Monty Python), there are stories about invading squirrels, the pseudo-Amish, and an assassination attempt on Santa by the Easter Bunny; recipes as adventurous as Fried Furry Squirrel and Amish Burger; and infotainative propaganda by the Ministry of Flesh; all connected by absurd segues and reoccurring themes.

These pieces are all hilarious in a maddening kind of way, packed as they are with sardonic wit and paranoia of the "us vs them" variety, the kind all too prevalent in politics, as this book parodies. Journalists write with rhetorical flourishes and $10 words, describing the decline and fall of Western Civilization, branded as the cure to civilization's three big ills: overpopulation, undernourishment, and methane emissions. That cure is furry farming: dressing people up as animals, and farming them. This flying circus looks at this process of dehumanization from all angles: furries, reverse furries, reverse reverse furries...

This book is a real gem, with juicy morsels on every page. Fun for the whole family, whether they're Flesh, Flayed, or Peking(rhymes with necking)ese.
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