Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

This title is not currently available for purchase
How Dogs Love Us: A Neuroscientist and His Adopted Dog Decode the Canine Brain by [Berns, Gregory]
Audible Narration
Playing...
Loading...
Paused
Kindle App Ad

How Dogs Love Us: A Neuroscientist and His Adopted Dog Decode the Canine Brain Kindle Edition

4.1 out of 5 stars 109 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"

Kindle Unlimited
Kindle Unlimited
Enjoy unlimited access to over 1 million titles and thousands of audiobooks on any device for £7.99 a month, including this one. Learn more

Product Description

Review

'If you've ever looked at your dog and wondered what's going on inside his head, you'll get a kick out of this book ...a fascinating, heart-warming insight into man's best friend.' Adelaide Advertiser 'Humorous and moving' New Idea "How Dogs Love Us makes a thought-provoking and often humorous case for something canine lovers have suspected for years: dogs are not simply 'Pavlovian learning machines' but, rather, sentient beings with a high level of empathy and an affinity for social learning. In answering his original question, he sparks many more about how we value and care for our canine companions." -- Kirsten Galles Shelf Awareness 'How Dogs Love Us is a fascinating account of a scientist's tenacious pursuit of the unknown. Gregory Berns's account of his lab's Dog Project provides readers with new insights into the minds of our most loyal companions while also reminding us that scientific research should be approached with passion, love, and a bold disregard for the possibility of failure.' -- Dan Ariely, author of The (Honest) Truth About Dishonesty 'An exciting journey to the center of a dog's emotional mind. Berns offers hilarious descriptions of training his dog to lie still while being fed hot dogs in the MRI brain-scan machine.' -- Temple Grandin, author of Animals Make Us Human 'With infectious passion for dogs, science, life, and love, Gregory Berns takes us on a rollicking yet scientifically serious study of the mental life of dogs - what dogs understand and how they think. Berns's tale is a dramatic but very funny look at how real, grubby science can accomplish great things. This is dognitive science at its insightful, passionate, and playful best.' -- Patricia Churchland, author of Touching a Nerve 'How Dogs Love Us is the beautifully written story of an iconoclastic neuroscientist challenging the status quo and seeking to truly understand the dogs with whom we share our lives.' -- Jennifer Arnold, author of Through a Dog's Eyes 'Amazingly entertaining and super smart. In How Dogs Love Us, Gregory Berns gives us our first real look inside the brain of a dog, while simultaneously setting new standards in ethical science. A truly great read!' -- Steven Kotler, author of A Small Furry Prayer 'Gregory Berns's book, packed with solid scientific research and warm personal stories, will set the agenda for future research on the minds and emotional lives of animals.' -- Marc Bekoff, author of The Emotional Lives of Animals 'Fast, fun, and funny, Gregory Berns demonstrates scientifically that dogs are people, too.' -- Laurence Gonzales, author of Surviving Survival 'Gregory Berns's amusing story about his dogs, his daughters, and a giant magnet communicates as no other what fun science can be.' -- Frans de Waal, author of The Bonobo and the Atheist 'This book lets you see inside the mind of a dog as never before. How Dogs Love Us will revolutionise how we understand animals - especially our dogs. This is a must-read for animal lovers and neuroscientists alike.' --Brian Hare, author of The Genius of Dogs

About the Author

Gregory Berns, M.D., Ph.D., is the Distinguished Professor of Neuroeconomics at Emory University. His research has been featured in the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, Forbes, the Los Angeles Times, Nature, Money, New Scientist, Psychology Today, and on CNN, NPR, ABC, and the BBC. He lives in Atlanta, Georgia, with his wife, two children, and three dogs.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 18269 KB
  • Print Length: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Amazon Publishing; 1 edition (22 Oct. 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00CLIK6NA
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars 109 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #129,932 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images or tell us about a lower price?


Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Quoted from the publisher review on Amazon: "Emory University neuroscientist Gregory Berns had spent decades using MRI imaging technology to study how the human brain works, but a different question still nagged at him: What is my dog thinking?"

This is primarily why i read this book. I have five dogs. I know a lot about them as individuals just from living closely with them, but I've always wondered about the extent of their cognition ... do they even see me as someone other than a food dispenser who they need to be nice to. Berns' book is based on his carefully constructed study from the beginning to the results and conclusions ... and convinced me of some very interesting features of dogs and their ability to think.

On top of the fascinating study and results, Berns is a great writer and researcher and he loves his dogs! ... which you can see does not bias his results or interpretations because of the very careful writing ... which is also a very good example of how ethical and responsible research should be carried out.

There were instances, and quite a few, where i wondered about the relevance of some of the topics, but as i read on the relevance became clear. The discourse is carefully constructed creating a complete picture of the context of the research and making it a much more enjoyable text to read than it otherwise would have been as a research report.

His description of the procedure needed to carry out the research and the training of the dogs was fascinating and at the same time raises difficult questions about traditional research methods which use animals as data sources.
Read more ›
Comment 25 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I quite enjoyed this book, and strongly agree with the conclusions.

But there is not very much science in here. Most of the chapters are a straightforward account of the development of an MRI experiment, with various personal family episodes thrown in. So for example we learn a lot about the science grades of the author's daughter at school, and how he coaxed her to work harder. The illness of one of the family's dogs (not involved in the experiment at all) gets an entire chapter. There is one odd episode where one of the dogs runs off during a picnic and they think he is lost - this doesn't really fit into the subject matter at all.

I think many British readers will find the tone rather mawkish for their taste. There is nothing wrong with being very sentimental, but we are not used to it(!), and especially not in a book like this.

The analysis of the experimental evidence towards the end is very interesting, and the author is probably forward looking in his outlook.

I would give it 3.5, if such a rating were available.
Comment 17 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Being a (human) cognitive neuroscientist and dog lover myself, I loved this book. It was a fun and easy read which was mostly about the process of getting the dogs in the MRI scanner, with (unfortunately) only a limited amount such scientific background information. However, reading about the process of training the dogs was really entertaining and it provides readers with a very realistic image about the process of MRI scanning. The Dog Project is visionary and important and I can't wait for more publications from this group.
The only drawback is that right at the end, the author lost me. He argues that dogs have theory of mind, but his argumentation behind this was unconvincing and based on a questionable reverse inference (activity in a certain brain area). I think it is an interesting idea that dogs have cross-species theory of mind, but the conclusion on this was just too strong (for now, who knows what further research will tell us!). Otherwise, great book!
Comment 12 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I'm a retired community paediatrician/psychiatrist so I just love the scientific proof of what we know instinctively. Our dogs love us, unconditionally, trustingly, and much more than we deserve.
The success of Gregory Berns in ethically, scientifically demonstrating the first neuroscientifically valid evidence that our dogs are not wolves in sheep's clothing - pace Cesar Millan - is just the beginning of clarifying the complex symbiotic relationship we have with our dogs.
Comment 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I enjoyed this book- there are some really interesting points: and there are some less interesting parts.

Berns is really interesting on what dogs are actually thinking. He's done work around how dogs respond to different stimuli by looking at their brains under an MRI scanner and the science he discusses in this book is rivetting, you want to know more. For example he discusses whether dogs have mirror neurons and have the same capacity to understand the point of view of others especially humans as we do. In that sense, are they themselves persons?

However alongside that there is a sentimental story about his family and his dogs that at times is charming but at times feels a little too sentimental, a little too familiar- like someone taking you through their family albums, fascinating to them but not so much to the rest of the world!
Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews

click to open popover