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How to Build a Girl by [Moran, Caitlin]
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How to Build a Girl Kindle Edition

3.9 out of 5 stars 301 customer reviews

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Length: 357 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Review

"Rowdy and fearless ... sloppy, big-hearted and alive in all the right ways.... Ms. Moran is often compared to Tina Fey and Lena Dunham, which is fair so far as it goes, though I'd add Amy Winehouse and the early Roseanne Barr to the mix."--Dwight Garner, "New York Times"

"Wonderfully wise and flat-out hilarious."--"People," Book of the Week

"Very funny.... Moran never loses touch with what seemed to me an authentic and believable teenage voice.... The joy of this easy-read novel is not just the scrappy protagonist.... Moran makes strong statements about social inequality and gender throughout."--Ellah Allfrey, NPR's "Fresh Air"

"I have so much love for Caitlin Moran."--Lena Dunham

"A smart, splendid, laugh-out-loud-funny novel."--"Boston Globe"

"A feminist coming-of-age tale.... Johanna is an irrepressible narrator, telling a mostly-true and funny tale of survival and success."--Joanna Scutts, "Washington Post Book World"

"Brilliantly observed, thrillingly rude and laugh-out-loud funny."--Helen Fielding, author of "Mad About the Boy" and "Bridget Jones's Diary"

"Rallying cries will always have a place in a yet-unfinished movement like feminism, but sometimes storytelling is more effective. The fictional Johanna Morrigan never drops the F-word, but readers can see she's asking all the right questions."--"New York Times Book Review"

"Very funny."--Megan Gibson, "Time"

"The earnestness with which Johanna goes about constructing a new persona gives the novel an almost irresistible verve, and the reader continues to root for her even during the most embarrassing episodes."--"The New Yorker"

"A funny book, heartfelt, silly, profane, insightful.... This is human stuff, a smile or laugh in almost every sentence---ften a snort, giggle, or guffaw--and you learn a lot about how girls get built."--"Philadelphia Inquirer"

"Binge-read all of "How To Build a Girl" in one sitting. Even missed supper. A first. Rose petals where 'ere you walk, Caitlin."--Nigella Lawson

"I crammed every word down like Cinnabon!"--Joss Whedon

"Vivid and full of truths.... There's a point in midlife, when you're already built, as it were, when the average coming-of-age story starts to feel completely uninteresting. But Moran is so lively, dazzlingly insightful and fun that "How to Build a Girl" transcends any age restrictions."--"San Francisco Chronicle"

"If anyone knows how to build a girl, it's Moran-she's put adolescence on the page in a book that's humming with authenticity."--"NPR" Best Book of the Year selection

"A funny, filthy and ultimately touching coming-of-age story.... Raunchy, wry and thoughtful-much like its vivacious heroine."--"Minneapolis Star Tribune"

"Brash, biting, comic.... Less a novelistic rendering of Moran's particularly gritty and appealing brand of feminism than an incisive and yet entertaining assessment of class dynamics in post-Thatcher Britain."--Chloe Schama, "New Republic"

Rowdy and fearless ... sloppy, big-hearted and alive in all the right ways . Ms. Moran is often compared to Tina Fey and Lena Dunham, which is fair so far as it goes, though I d add Amy Winehouse and the early Roseanne Barr to the mix. --Dwight Garner, "New York Times""

Vivid and full of truths . There s a point in midlife, when you re already built, as it were, when the average coming-of-age story starts to feel completely uninteresting. But Moran is so lively, dazzlingly insightful and fun that How to Build a Girl transcends any age restrictions. --"San Francisco Chronicle""

Wonderfully wise and flat-out hilarious. --"People," Book of the Week"

Very funny.... Moran never loses touch with what seemed to me an authentic and believable teenage voice . The joy of this easy-read novel is not just the scrappy protagonist . Moran makes strong statements about social inequality and gender throughout. --Ellah Allfrey, NPR's "Fresh Air""

I have so much love for Caitlin Moran. --Lena Dunham"

The earnestness with which Johanna goes about constructing a new persona gives the novel an almost irresistible verve, and the reader continues to root for her even during the most embarrassing episodes. --"The New Yorker""

A smart, splendid, laugh-out-loud-funny novel. --"Boston Globe""

A feminist coming-of-age tale . Johanna is an irrepressible narrator, telling a mostly-true and funny tale of survival and success. --Joanna Scutts, "Washington Post Book World""

Brilliantly observed, thrillingly rude and laugh-out-loud funny. --Helen Fielding, author of "Mad About the Boy" and "Bridget Jones's Diary""

Binge-read all of "How To Build a Girl" in one sitting. Even missed supper. A first. Rose petals where ere you walk, Caitlin. --Nigella Lawson"

Rallying cries will always have a place in a yet-unfinished movement like feminism, but sometimes storytelling is more effective. The fictional Johanna Morrigan never drops the F-word, but readers can see she s asking all the right questions. --"New York Times Book Review""

If anyone knows how to build a girl, it s Moran-she s put adolescence on the page in a book that s humming with authenticity. --"NPR" Best Book of the Year selection"

Very funny. --Megan Gibson, "Time""

I crammed every word down like Cinnabon! --Joss Whedon"

A funny book, heartfelt, silly, profane, insightful . This is human stuff, a smile or laugh in almost every sentence-ften a snort, giggle, or guffawand you learn a lot about how girls get built. --"Philadelphia Inquirer""

Brash, biting, comic . Less a novelistic rendering of Moran s particularly gritty and appealing brand of feminism than an incisive and yet entertaining assessment of class dynamics in post-Thatcher Britain. --Chloe Schama, "New Republic""

A funny, filthy and ultimately touching coming-of-age story . Raunchy, wry and thoughtful-much like its vivacious heroine. --"Minneapolis Star Tribune""

Book Description

The number 1 Sunday Times bestseller, the debut grown-up novel from Caitlin Moran, bestselling author of How To Be A Woman

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 2045 KB
  • Print Length: 357 pages
  • Publisher: Ebury Digital (3 July 2014)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0091949009
  • ISBN-13: 978-0091949006
  • ASIN: B00ITVYYKE
  • Text-to-Speech: Not enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars 301 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,420 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
.....only with different names. This is basically How To Be a Woman all over again, only the heroine's surname is Morrigan not Moran. Actually had to stop a couple of times to check I hadn't accidentally picked up the other book by mistake. There is not much new here.

Moran is a very funny writer, but please. Also all the reviews calling it a "debut novel"? Come on, she's been writing books for decades. She is essentially the female Kingsley Amis: you get the same entertaining, but far too familiar book again, and again, and again. How many home schooled working class 90s teens from Wolverhampton do we need to hear about for her to acknowledge, we got the point?

This seems to be written for adults who want to read the YA fiction they wish they had in the 90s instead of real books. OK for all that but I expected more. Moran has a lot of talent. Here's hoping someone pushes her to write about something other than herself next time.
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Format: Kindle Edition
This is How To Be A Woman - re-named, re-packed and re-cycled as a shallow money-making exercise by Moran and her publishers.

It's almost as if she went through all the discarded notes/entries for HTBAW and used them here. Lazy, unconvincing and - at times - a bit sexist.

Couldn't she have at least have changed the story location from Wolverhampton? I'm amazed the editor didn't demand this.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Having read 'How to be a Woman' and publicly cried with laughter reading it on my daily commute, I pre-ordered 'How to build a girl' anticipating another great read from Caitlin Moran. However, I was bitterly disappointed. Whilst Moran states that this book is entirely fiction and the main character of Johanna is not based on herself, the similarities with descriptions of her own childhood are uncanny. The character essentially has exactly the same upbringing and early career as Moran and you can't help but think all the scenes are based on anecdotes from Moran's own wild lifestyle in the 90s music scene. This book seems lazy. There is nothing new here besides the over the top, unnecessarily descriptive accounts of a teenage girl's sex life which leave you feeling slightly uncomfortable and I'm not usually one to be prudish at all.

It seems to me that Moran lazily rushed out a book based on her own life which she has already written about rather than use her imagination to come up with a new story and littered it with vulgar scenes in order to be 'controversial' and 'shocking'. Perhaps she should stick to non-fiction. I can relate to that and it and has had me in tears both with laughter and anguish.

I cannot recommend this book but I strongly recommend you buy How to be a Woman instead as that is a book that truly touches the heart and changes how you feel about being a woman.
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Format: Hardcover
I'm a fan of Caitlin and wanted to like this, bug it was a big disappointment. It covers the exactly same ground as the autobiographical 'How to be a woman' and Caitlin's sitcom 'Raised by wolves', ie being an overweight, unpopular teenage girl raised in a large, poor family in the Midlands. Caitlin only seems capable of writing about herself - which works well for her column, but not for what is supposedly a work of fiction.

This book really doesn't have much in the way of a plot, and I suspect it would never have been published if written by a lesser-known author. At times, the writing felt forced. I read that Caitlin really struggled to write this book, needing lots of encouragement and intervention from her publishers, and I suspect it's because she's already written extensively about the subject matter and had nothing new to say. How much can you milk the experience of being being poor/living in a big family before people get bored? Well, I'm bored. And this book came across as a cynical money-making effort rather than a work of true creativity.

If you haven't already read it, I recommend the excellent 'How to be a woman' instead. If you have already read it, don't bother with this 'new' book, which is truly nothing new.
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Format: Hardcover
It’s ironic that a novel about a young woman who becomes a music journalist is like listening to a monkey endlessly pounding out the same two notes on a piano.

Moran is a good writer, stylistically you cannot fault her, but her subject matter has now officially not just worn thin, but completely and utterly worn through. Despite the disclaimer at the beginning, this is really just a warming-over of her own story, already well and truly milked in How to be a Woman and squeezed even further dry by her columns.

The only thing that I can see is different between her own life is the number of siblings. As is well documented, Moran is one of eight, in this novel there are “only” five children, with the youngest twins. Mercifully, this lets the reader off of her regular entrenched proselytising about the welfare state and her belief that having almost a football team of children when you have no hope at all of financially supporting them at all is some kind of noble enterprise.

Most worrying of all is the ending; it is left quite open, with the heroine’s move to London. I have a feeling that this is not the last we’ll hear of Dolly Wilde.

Water finds its level; Moran is unlikely to rise any furhter than this until she finds some new subject matter. Even enfants terribles all need to grow up some day.
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