FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
How I Became Stupid has been added to your Basket

Dispatch to:
To see addresses, please
Or
Please enter a valid UK postcode.
Or
FREE Delivery on orders over £10.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: This book is eligible for free delivery anywhere in the UK. Your order will be picked, packed and dispatched by Amazon. Buy with confidence!
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

How I Became Stupid Paperback – 30 Nov 2004

3.4 out of 5 stars 7 customer reviews

See all 8 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£11.01
£5.51 £0.01
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more

Man Booker International Prize 2017
A Horse Walks Into a Bar has won the Man Booker International Prize 2017. Learn more
£11.01 FREE Delivery in the UK. Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.



Product details

  • Paperback: 160 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Books (30 Nov. 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0142004952
  • ISBN-13: 978-0142004951
  • Product Dimensions: 13 x 1.3 x 18.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 64,819 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • If you are a seller for this product, would you like to suggest updates through seller support?

Product description

Review

A wild yet powerful book. ("Elle")

A harmonious and surprising mixture of optimism and nihilism. (La Vie Magazine)

A wild yet powerful book. (Elle)

About the Author

Martin Page was born in 1975. He is a student of anthropology. This is his first novel.

Customer Reviews

3.4 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Had big expectations, but it ended so weirdly!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I've just read this in the original French as "Comment je suis devenu stupide" (trying to improve my grasp of the language and it's good to read short novels!) and thought it was refreshing. The central character, Antoine, is convinced that he's unhappy because he overthinks everything and his mind hyperactively tries to understand everything; he believes that stupid people are much happier and thinks that if he can only become stupid himself, it will solve his problems.

There's a fair amount of the whimsical and (deliberately) ridiculous in this account of what happens but I found that charming and engaging (like Antoine's character) and the characters' debates about life and happiness are very creative (and very French, I think - I don't think you could imagine an English author writing this book).

I'd have given this five stars if it hadn't been for the slappable character who appears at the end but maybe that's just me! If you're studying at 'A' level or similar, why not order this in French from French Amazon - it will stretch you a bit on vocabulary (which is a good thing) but it's a fun read and will reward you!
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
In fact, I did. I sat down in a comfy leather chair in Waterstones Picadilly and got through it in no time. So it's a page turner and quite quaffable, that said it doesn't quite pan out satisfactorily. The bloke seems to be prescribed Prozac (called Happyzac for some reason in the book) and suddenly his world, hitherto depressed and complicated, slips into gear. Well, if only life were that simple. There are some nice insights however, in the difference between those who live individual lives that don't follow a blueprint and those who go with the flow and fit in with everyone else, saving themselves a lot of energy.

It can't be taken as realistic though; a guy who can only read books by tearing pages out one at a time in a bookshop and taking them home would not be able to afford taking up alcoholism, and it's not exactly hard to commit suicide, as he seems to find out in his next venture. And I don't imagine one can just effortlessly turn his hand to his next venture... And such a supposed loser wouldn't have a bunch of friend to rally round and take an interest in him, surely... But there are nice insights, as I say, in novel form.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
How I became stupid tells the story of a young man weighed down by the pressures of his intelligence, and his battle to find the simpler form of happiness he sees all around him. Cue failed alcoholism, an adult-learning class in suicide, coffee-spill induced stock market success, the trappings of consumerism and, eventually a sense of contentment. But is it his new life that offers him this, or the friends he has left behind? This internationally successful Cult novel is a hilarious indictment of life, every bit as insightful as Brett Easton Ellis, without that smug, self satisfied arrogance. This is a book for a summer trip, easily readable, short and accessible, you cannot go wrong with this.
Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Look for similar items by category