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The House at Riverton by [Morton, Kate]
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The House at Riverton Kindle Edition

4.0 out of 5 stars 717 customer reviews

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Product Description

Review

A charming mixture of love and mystery. --Lancashire Evening Post

Judy Finnigan, Richard and Judy, Channel 4

'It's a corker...probably my favourite of all the Summer Reads'

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1623 KB
  • Print Length: 612 pages
  • Publisher: Pan; Reprints edition (4 Sept. 2008)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B003GK22HK
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars 717 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #3,142 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
This is not so much a review as an explanation as to why Shifting Fog cannot be found on the bookshelf. It is in fact the Australian version of the House at Riverton which I found out when visiting Kate Morton's website.
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Format: Paperback
I bought this book on a dreary Sunday afternoon. You know how it is... desperate for a good read but not quite knowing what to buy. As I picked this book from the shelf I imagined it to be sitting months later, half read and abandoned along with countless others that had not quite managed to grab my attention longer than the first chapter. I couldn't have been more wrong.

Riverton Manor. A grand English country house. Home to Hannah and Emmiline Hartford. Theirs a life of privilage, with all its finery and glittering society parties. Mystery and secrets. Love, loss and tragedy.
Here, hidden beneath the layers of time the ghosts of old memories are stirred.

Their story is told by Grace Bradley. One time housemaid at Riverton. As the tale unfolds a secret is about to emerge, something forgotten in the midsts of time but not as it seems by Grace...

There is just something in the way its written. I couldn't put it down and was disappointed once I'd finished it. Realizing there was nothing more to learn about the lives of Hannah, Emm and Grace.

A book which will stay with you long after it has been returned once more to the shelf!
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Format: Paperback
This has to be one of the best books I have read in a long time. I first saw the book in the Amazon top 100 and later I saw it on the Richard and Judy Summer Reads list. I am so pleased I decided to pick it up! The book is set in the 20's and is told through the eyes of Grace, a ladies maid at Riverton House. The description of the times and the people are so real and I almost felt I was there. The story jumps between Grace now, at the age of 99 and Grace at the age of 14 as a maid. I agree with some of the other reviews that the beginning is a bit slow but it is definitely necessary. You share the characters loves, passions and grief and the story shows how Grace is also affected by the family's events. This book is beautifully written - I look forward to Kate Morton's next book.
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Format: Paperback
I immediately fell in love with the main character - what a lovely old lady - and was struck by the similarity in way the story is explored to the Titantic film of a few years ago.
The character development is very gradual, which cleverly kept me enthralled as there was always little bits of information being given within the narrative.
All through the book the suspense is kept very high as you know from the beginnning that something dramatic is going to happen but are not quite sure how until the very last few pages.
As Grace slips towards death, the book increases the emotion until I could not put it down.
Would recommend to anyone.
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Format: Paperback
One thing that struck me about the reviews of this book was how they were divided between the 'love it' and 'hate it' camps. That was one reason why I decided to read it for myself as any book that causes such polarity is bound to either be excellent or terrible trash.
I am not easy to please, as those who've seen any of my other reviews will have noticed; but this is a good book. I do think the author was a little self-consciously writing it with a view to seeing it become a 'Gosford Park' type film and the story is actually made into a film during the book.
I did guess quite early on what the secret of Grace's birth was, and a little later on just who her father actually was. It didn't matter a bit that I had done so - Grace herself is such an engaging narrator that I was happy to go on the journey of discovery with her, at her pace.
The other 'secret' around the sisters and the poet was a little harder to work out, but was quite satisfyingly revealed at the end of the book.
The period detail is excellent. The book is set at a time of great transition; a fascinating time in our recent past.
If you enjoyed 'Gosford Park', you will love this too. The whole 'upstairs, downstairs' set up, the stately home, the aristocracy and the nouveau riche, the wild 20's and the gradual liberation of women are all encompassed in this novel.
I thoroughly enjoyed it and it made me cry too.
I would recommend this book.
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Format: Paperback
This was a "nice" book, a gentle read for a summer Sunday afternoon lying in the garden with an ice cold drink. It won't tax your brain and it won't change your life but it will entertain you and leave you feeling relaxed and chilled out. I thought it was pretty slow in parts, especially at the start but I had just read "Relentless" before starting this (another book on the Richard and Judy summer read list) so by comparison most things would probably seem slow! Some good editing during the first 100 or so pages would have helped the story to flow more easily.

I liked Grace and particularly enjoyed the author's ability to make an elderly lady so alive and real, not simply a charicature of what an elderly lady should be.

The most glaring of errors in it for me, was Grace's very belated realisation of who her father was, it was transparently evident to the reader at a very early stage of the book, whether this was intentional or not on the author's part I'm not sure, maybe she wanted us to know while Grace didn't? It was frustrating to read though and the point of realisation made me just want to shake her!

It did provide me with a better understanding of how the old class system of upstairs/downstairs survived as long as it did, something that is hard for our society now to get to grips with was made more understandable in this book - I thought the author did a good job of this.

It was, to summarise, a pleasant but not earth shattering read.
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