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Customer reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
79
4.7 out of 5 stars


on 22 October 2017
The House of Wax seems to have a history in my family. My late mother saw it as a young woman in Fiji in 3D and I saw it many years later in 3D at the BFI Southbank in London. I now have my own DVD copy at long last.

It was re-made in 2005 but it is incomparable to this 1953 classic directed by Andre de Toth starring the grandmaster of horror, Vincent Price. The House of Wax 1953 is a re-make of the 1933 film, The Mystery of the Wax Museum and stars the legendary grandmaster of horror, Vincent Price in one of his iconic horror roles as Professor Henry Jarrod.

Professor Henry Jarrod (Price) is distraught, depressed, saddened and horrifically facially disfigured after an arsonist destroys his beloved House of Wax Museum. He emerges with a vengeance opening a spectacular and magnificent new House of Wax Museum that becomes the talk of the town. However, the new wax figures are real life corpses .........

Vincent Price is excellent as the evil, Professor Henry Jarrod. There is a screen appearance from Charles Bronson as Jarrod's assistant and partner in crime. Wax historical figures, boiling hot vats of wax, disappearing corpses, disfigured people, mayhem and murder. This is vintage Vincent Price.A true horror film classic.
See it at your peril ...........
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on 13 July 2013
Having watched Sir Graves Ghastly in Detroit Michigan in the 60's and 70's I became enchanted with Horrors on Saturday afternoons!!! Vincent Price was a regular Star in these Horror Movie Classics and recently I researched Mr. Price!!! I found that The House Of Wax was the pivotal start of him into the Horror genera!!! So you see, I had, to own this Vincent Price Classic!!! At my first attempt at obtaining the DVD, Amazon said that this title was unknown but only three days after this I got a post on Facebook about Mr. Price, With a dialogue from the ghouls and goblins who said it was available at Amazon which I quickly ordered!!! The two movie themes do not run congruent with the same theme, although, in a few ways it does. Such as enclosing humans in wax and the Madness theme!!! Overall I'd say that this is a must buy for Us Horror Classic fans out there!!! Shame to the telly stations that don't play the Horror Genera any more!!! Perhaps they believe that Madness has been cured!!!
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on 8 May 2017
Classic horror with the Prince Vincent Price..love it...no jerky cameras nor stupid teenagers..yhey just dont make them anymore like this
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on 26 April 2017
Good quality 1950s 3-D movie. This washy first experience of 3-D in the cinema, and it scared me. Excellent film
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on 11 October 2017
Great film with vincent price in top form
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on 2 August 2017
Great movie bincent price at his best
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on 1 November 2017
Bought to replace old VHS tape
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on 11 January 2017
classic
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on 7 November 2017
Works. Difficult to believe this was produced over 60 years ago
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on 8 February 2014
At last, after 60 years, the chance to see House of Wax as it was originally envisaged – in 3D! A revolutionary film at the time of its release, the film was the first major studio production to be shot in this process and it presented Vincent Price as the murderous owner of a wax museum - a role that would open up new career horizons and establish him as a horror icon.

Perhaps the film won’t shock contemporary viewers as it did back in 1953 but it still has grotesque impact, undoubtedly heightened by the third dimension, especially in the museum’s cellar sequence as a frightened Phyllis Kirk tries to escape the clutches of Charles Bronson. To the 3D process itself, although it might not have objects hurtling out of the screen (apart from sequences featuring a theatre barker with bat and balls and female dancers kicking out their legs) its real strength lies in the depth of vision created by the moving camerawork – a remarkable feat by one-eyed director Andre DeToth who, obviously, would never witness the full results of his work.

Finely restored to its original glory for its’ BluRay debut, the disc also includes the film in normal 2D and “Mystery Of The Wax Museum”, the 1933 two-strip Technicolor horror that was the source for “House of Wax” two decades later. Plus other extras include soundtrack commentary, trailer, newsreel and ”House Of Wax: Unlike Anything You’ve Ever Seen Before”, a fascinating 50 minutes insight into the creation of the movie. Overall, a deservedly top class presentation for such a ground-breaking film that might, hopefully, lead on to the release of further third dimension movies.
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