Quantity:1
The House on 92nd Street ... has been added to your Basket
+ £1.26 UK delivery
Used: Like New | Details
Sold by squeaky_uk
Condition: Used: Like New
Comment: played to check condition
Other Sellers on Amazon
Add to Basket
£4.66
& FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20.00. Details
Sold by: Amazon
Add to Basket
£4.99
& FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20.00. Details
Sold by: 101Trading
Add to Basket
£5.45
& FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20.00. Details
Sold by: rsdvd
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

The House on 92nd Street [DVD] [1945]

4.2 out of 5 stars 15 customer reviews

Price: £4.56 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details
Only 8 left in stock.
Sold by Discs4all and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more
21 new from £3.57 3 used from £2.00 1 collectible from £14.80

LOVEFiLM By Post

£4.56 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details Only 8 left in stock. Sold by Discs4all and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Special Offers and Product Promotions


Frequently Bought Together

  • The House on 92nd Street [DVD] [1945]
  • +
  • Somewhere in the Night [DVD] [1946]
  • +
  • The Street With No Name [DVD] [1948]
Total price: £13.60
Buy the selected items together

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customers Also Watched on Amazon Video


Product details

  • Actors: William Eythe, Lloyd Nolan, Signe Hasso, Gene Lockhart, Leo G. Carroll
  • Directors: Henry Hathaway
  • Format: PAL
  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: English, French, Italian, German, Spanish, Arabic, Bulgarian, Croatian, Czech, Danish, Dutch, Finnish, Greek, Hebrew, Hungarian, Portuguese, Icelandic, Norwegian, Slovene, Swedish
  • Dubbed: Italian, Spanish
  • Subtitles For The Hearing Impaired: English
  • Audio Description: None
  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 4:3 - 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: U
  • Studio: 20th Century Fox Home Entertainment
  • DVD Release Date: 24 Sept. 2012
  • Run Time: 84 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B008J211V8
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 37,630 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Product Description

Product Description

A stentorian narrator tells us that the USA was flooded with Nazi spies in 1939-41. One such tries to recruit college grad Bill Dietrich, who becomes a double agent for the FBI. While Bill trains in Hamburg, a street-accident victim proves to have been spying on atom-bomb secrets; conveniently, Dietrich is assigned to the New York spy ring stealing these secrets. Can he track down the mysterious "Christopher" before his ruthless associates unmask and kill him?

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

By Spike Owen TOP 500 REVIEWER on 3 April 2011
Format: DVD
The House on 92nd Street is directed by Henry Hathaway with a screenplay co-written by Jack Moffitt, Barré Lyndon and John Monks Jr, adapted from a story by Charles G. Booth. It stars William Eythe, Lloyd Nolan, Signe Hasso, Gene Lockhart and Leo G. Carroll. Music is by David Buttolph and photography Norbert Brodine.

"This story is adapted from cases in the espionage files of the Federal Bureau of Investigation. Produced with the F.B.I.'s complete co-operation, it could not be made public until the first Atomic Bomb was dropped on Japan"

Thought to be based around the FBI's real life Duquesne Spy Ring case of 1941/42, where 33 Nazi spies were captured and sentenced to more than 300 years in prison, The House on 92nd Street is undoubtedly a historically interesting artifact of note. It's also a film whose influence on the sub-genre of semi-documentary crime film's is not in question, in fact, it can be held up as the forerunner of film's such as The Naked City. Yet watching it now it just comes across as an advertisement for how good the FBI are, while the effects used are archaic and extremely hard to get excited about. The acting, too, is pretty average at best, where no amount of arguing that it adds realism can account for some plainly delivered set-ups. One or two intriguing moments aside, it's a basically executed film set around a very good story. While film noir fans should be aware that although it's frequently mentioned as part of the film noir universe, it's really not very noir at all.

A semi-sequel called The Street with No Name followed in 1948, with Lloyd Nolan reprising his role as Inspector Briggs, and that itself was reworked into House of Bamboo in 1955, where the setting was Tokyo. Both of these film's are considerably better than Hathaway's FBI propaganda piece. 4/10
2 Comments 8 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: DVD
"This story is adapted from the cases in the espionage files of the Federal Bureau of Investigation. Produced with the F.B.I.'s complete cooperation, it could not be made public until the first atomic bomb was dropped on Japan." So reads the introduction. Despite 20th Century Fox marketing this DVD as a noir, it's just a pompous semi-documentary...a paean to the FBI. We're sitting in the church of J. Edgar Hoover and Hollywood has written the sermon and is leading the choir. For the first 20 minutes of this 87 minute movie we're taken on a tour of FBI resources, told of FBI dedication to fight spies..."vigilant, tireless, implacable"...and shown how FBI knowledge of German secret agents protected this nation, especially when it came to foiling Nazi plans to discover "Process 97" (the atomic bomb). If we're not grateful to the FBI by the time the story starts, we still have Reed Hadley's stentorian voice-over and a music score that's part soap opera, part grand opera to come to grips with.

Bill Dietrich (William Eythe), "a brilliant young student," is recruited in 1939 by the Nazi's in America to be a German agent just before he graduates. Dietrich immediately reports this to the FBI. They agree that he will take the offer and then, after training in Germany, become a double agent when the Nazis send him back to the States. When he arrives in New York, he joins a Nazi ring led by Elsa Gebhardt (Signe Hasso), a beautiful, icy blonde who owns a haute couture dress shop on 92nd Street. She rents the five story building, lives there and uses it as her cell's headquarters. Her cell seems to be made up of thugs, goons and manly women. Dietrich sets himself up as a contact point between Gebhardt's operation and Germany.
Read more ›
Comment 8 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: DVD
"The House on 92nd Street," (1945), an 88 minute, black and white American thriller from the immediate postwar period, is a crime drama/ spy story with many claims to fame. The mystery has been classified as a film noir, which it is not, although it is in black and white, and does boast some deeply black scenes; perhaps it's best considered as an influential pre-film noir. It was written by Barre Lyndon and Charles G. Booth, directed by Henry Hathaway, and produced by Louis de Rochement, who did similar honors for the "March of Time" newsreels that used to be played in movie houses before the features. It pioneered the semi-documentary look in American filmmaking, which the public loved, and turned out for in droves. The same team of Hathaway and Rochemont would shortly make another semi-documentary address film, 13 Rue Madeleine [DVD], which would be followed by a boomlet of address-named films, and semi-documentary pictures. And, similarly to 13 RUE MADELEINE, it is a "now it can be told" picture, held back until the end of World War II, so as not to give any information to the Germans and their allies, our enemies at the time.

Similarly to a newsreel, the film opens with a stentorian voiceover from an announcer who sounds true-blue Federal Bureau of Investigation. He tells us that in the war years of 1939-41, America was overrun with German agents - the Axis powers suspected something was up, and it was. (Russian agents were also very active at the time, for the same reason, but this picture does not touch on that aspect of the war.) A fatal New York City taxi accident has occurred; during its investigation, the FBI discovers that the victim was a Nazi spy.
Read more ›
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Customer Discussions


Look for similar items by category


Feedback