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The Horologicon by [Forsyth, Mark]
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The Horologicon Kindle Edition

4.4 out of 5 stars 195 customer reviews

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Length: 275 pages Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled Page Flip: Enabled
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Product description

Review

'Reading The Horologicon in one sitting is very tempting' -- Roland White, Sunday Times 'A delightfully eccentric ... illuminating new book' -- Daily Mail 'Whether you are out on the pickaroon or ogo-pogoing for a bellibone, The Horologicon is a lexical lamppost' -- The Field

Review

'Reading The Horologicon in one sitting is very tempting' (Roland White, Sunday Times)

‘A magical new book … Forsyth unveils a selection of those obsolete, but oh-so-wonderful words' (Daily Mail)

'Whether you are out on the pickaroon or ogo-pogoing for a bellibone, The Horologicon is a lexical lamppost' (The Field)

‘A delightfully eccentric … illuminating new book.’ (Daily Mail)

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1681 KB
  • Print Length: 275 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 1848314159
  • Publisher: Icon Books Ltd (1 Nov. 2012)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00KFEJJR6
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars 195 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #132,450 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer reviews

Top customer reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Witty, interesting and useful!
I thoroughly enjoyed this book, as I have several other of the author's works. Filled with funny commentaries on daily activities with plenty of new words to use in all situations.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Not as good as etymological but still interesting and amusing
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This book is a must-have if you love words - I fell in love with it and that was only his introduction, which was very very funny. Can't recommend it highly enough.
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Format: Paperback
Audience: Those who love the meaning and origins of words.

Summed up in one word: There isn't just one word for this book...there are lots...

Author Bio: Mark Forsyth is a writer, journalist, proofreader, ghost writer and pendant. After starting his Inky Fool blog, he continued that work into The Horologicon. MF loves etymology and he is a gifted wordsmith!

First Impression: I am so happy when I come across books like this. Books that talk about words, books, bookshops or any other interesting subject surrounding the written word are very special to me and this does not disappoint. Mark Forsyth has written 4 books, of which 3 sit on my shelf as I can't get enough of his way with words. This is sort of a serious read, but with all the wit, humour and great words, this book is a blast.

Summary:
The Tagline for this book is:

'A Day's Jaunt Through the Lost Words of the English Language'

Mark Forsyth maps out our day from waking up at 6am to going to bed at 12am (possibly drunk). With this time-frame MF unveils lots of lost words and phrases of the items/activities/actions we experience everyday. From Aztec to Medieval. From Victorian to the Second World War. These words have lost their places in our modern society, but that does not make them incredibly interesting and worth knowing. Even if it is just to spice up everyday conversation or to confuse/annoy colleagues and loved ones with ancient insults that have amazing and rich history in past cultures.

This book begins when we open our eyes in the morning, woken up by one of the various 'expergefactors' that occur in the start of the day. We get ready for work, 'Jenticulate', usually with 'cackling farts'.
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Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
First of all, I have to admit that I went against the author's recommendation and read this book from cover to cover; alas, at least so far, I have not suffered from any ill-effects. A warning to any prospective readers though: while reading this, what Mark Forsyth calls a serious "reference work", I was rather prone to reading out random passages to my unsuspecting husband who had no choice but to listen. Please bear that in mind before you decide to buy the book.

As the front cover tells us, this is "A Day's Jaunt Through the Lost Words of the English Language", starting at 6 a.m. and ending at midnight. Each chapter, comprising one hour, deals with one major activity particular to that time of day, such as Waking and Washing, Dressing and Breakfast, and Commute. In his preambulation, the author hopes that this book will be used as a reverse dictionary: rather than asking "What does xyz mean?", he encourages the reader to ask "What's the word?" for a particular activity, then check the time and find the answer in this handy reference book, such as: "I really don't feel like going in to work today, I have to call up my boss to feign sickness", for which the word is egrote. The fact that my laptop's inbuilt spellchecker has just flagged it up just shows you how forgotten and obscure these words have (unfortunately) become. So your boss will not have the faintest idea that what you're really doing is whindling because you're suffering from a hum durgeon. The author's whimsical and easy-going conversational style of writing rather masks his eloquence and hard work that has obviously gone into this book, and it is easy to tell that it is a true labour of love, peppered as it is with such lovely alliterations such as herbaceous hedonism and linguistic lowlands.
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Format: Hardcover
After really enjoying 'The Etymologicon' last year, I had great expectations of Mark Forsyth's new book and thankfully it didn't disappoint. 'The Horologicon' is the same but different: crucially, the dry, clever wit present in the previous book is still there and, perhaps unsurprisingly, the new one is also about words. However, it's the nature of these words that marks the book out as being different, and even more worthwhile, than the first. Whereas The Etymologicon dealt with everyday words and phrases - a much travelled path in the world of books although never previously with such an entertaining guide - 'The Horologicon' is all about forgotten words, ones with their own peculiar and distinct meaning and flavour. To make the trip through this language that time forgot as enjoyable as possible, the author sets up his tour brilliantly by following day in the life of you, me and he himself. What felt like everyday commonplace is made all the richer for it. I only hope I'm not guilty of 'ultracrepidarianism'! But you can be the judge of that.
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Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I haven't read anything else by Mark Forsyth and wasn't sure what to expect. Certainly wasn't expecting this wonderful mix of fun and fact. Full credit has to go to Forsyth if only for the amount of work that went into researching The Horologicon. Firstly; this isn't a book you'd necessarily want to sit down and read from cover to cover in one sitting. The Horologicon is more a book you dip in and out off for fun, or inspiration, unless you're a English language buff or a quiz master. Written in the form of a book of hours, the chapters are broken up into time slices:-

Chapter 1:- 6 am - Dawn
Chapter 2: 7 am - Waking and Washing
Continuing through until Midnight.

Each time slice contains a selection of extraordinary words relative to their own particular time of day. You might not think you'll ever use words like these but; once you've read the book I'll bet you're soon dropping them into the conversation. It's impossible not to do it once you've become "infected". My favourite is "quidnunc" - you'll have to read the book. I know a great many of them!.

Of course, The Horologican isn't simply a list of words or the usual Dictionary. Each word is accompanied by a wealth of information explaining it's origin, type, history and, even more importantly, where it should sit in a sentence so you sound as though you know what you're talking about!.

If you're writing a speech, hosting a quiz, interested in the English language or just want a laugh then you'll get a great deal of fun out of The Horologicon.
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