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Hood by [Donoghue, Emma]
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Hood Kindle Edition

4.0 out of 5 stars 15 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 799 KB
  • Print Length: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Picador (4 July 2013)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00DRCBUNO
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars 15 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #127,414 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
This is Emma Donoghue's second novel, and is the one that her fans had been hoping she'd write; bigger, more ambitious, tougher, dealing with the pain of bereavement and the even more elusive pain of having to hide your grief. Donoghue is brilliant at getting inside the curiously detached and stunned psyche of her main character, Pen (another one of Donoghue's suggestive character names: the dead lover is called Cara, the lover's father - with whom the two women lived - is Mr Wall. Symbolism ahoy!) Once again, her technique of dramatising feelings by behaviour rather than by indigestible flights of interior monologue pays off. Pen gobbles cakes on the bus and then pukes them into a bush; she fantasises about making a pass at her lover's emigre sister. The days go by and she seems no closer to having any definite feelings about her lover's death, or her current predicament. Hood has more respect for its minor characters than Donoghue's earlier Stir-Fry, probably because the characters are older and not being seen through the eyes of a seventeen-year-old. As it says on the back cover, it's a kind of hymn to the pleasure of feeling ordinary; in a sense, you could say that of all her books, but this one dramatises it particularly well. Beautifully written, intelligent and unsentimental. A lovely book.
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Format: Paperback
Emma Donaghue provides us with a enigmatic look at just a splinter of what it feels like to lose somebody you love and bear all this pain in secret. She writes supremely making the reader believe this story with all the small details of what being in a relationship is all about, the fighting, and not forgetting the making up. It is one of the most powerful stories that I have ever read and helps me belive that sometimes you are not on your own.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Found it hard to get into the characters of this book, that's why I only gave this a four star rating. It wasn't until I had read about three quarters of the book that I knew who the characters actually were, then it became rather disjointed. Never quite sure if it was a memory or actual happening. However, after saying that, I think now after getting to grips with the characters and now knowing that Grace is a male cat (I know different) and not a friend, a second read maybe on the cards but I`m in no rush.
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Format: Paperback
Hood is what I'd describe as quite a 'quiet' book. There is no real action but Emma Donoghue manages to cram a lot in over the course of the book. The story revolves around Pen and Cara in the week following Cara's death. Set in Ireland, in the early nineties, Pen leads a fairly closeted life and despite living with Cara's father has no one to really talk to so she finds herself wrapped in the memories of Cara.

What I particularly enjoyed was the texture of Pen and Cara - they are flawed and that goes for their relationship too. Cara sometimes comes off as self indulgent and flighty, Pen is too forgiving and can even see that her relentless love towards Cara isn't necessarily deserved. I suppose all of this makes the characters relatable. I've given this 5 stars because it was so lovely and rich, I found myself trying to prolong the book even though it was so compulsively readable. It was exactly the sort of book I was looking for when I first picked it up, and I find myself going back to it, however I wouldn't recommend it to someone who wants a novel thick on plot.

I have read and enjoyed Emma Donoghue before - it feels like each of her books are so different in theme and style but this shares that same sense of tenderness and detail that seems to run through them all.
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Format: Kindle Edition
I’m late coming to this second book of Emma Donoghue’s and am delighted to have found it. Pen’s partner, Cara, dies in a car crash on her way back from the airport. She has been on a holiday with friends, without Pen. Pen is left bereaved, the unacknowledged partner/lover of another woman. In the days before the funeral Pen recounts her 13 years with Cara, a relationship that began at school. In those years they do have months apart but Cara always returns. It is a truthful if flawed relationship of love, sex, devotion, tumult, forgiveness and reconciliation and a curious fidelity on Cara’s part.

Pen is faithful, comes over as almost motherly. Cara is odd, unique, flighty and irresistible. For the last four years they have lived with Cara’s father, appropriately named Mr Wall, a distantly loving man. It is left to the reader to work out if he knows about the girls’ relationship.

Cara’s sister, Kate, arrives from the US where she has lived since the age of 16 with her mother. Pen knew her at school and old feelings for her are re-awakened. I worried about the ending but didn’t need to. There are also some moments of wry humour.

Kate is a little too lightly drawn as is Mr Wall. Despite these minor quibbles Donoghue’s language is a joy. I read her words as I listen to a piece of music. A brilliant, insightful, sensitive writer.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I was going to say that Emma Donaghue writes like an angel, but in all truth it would have to be a seraph at the very least to have such a facility with words, such a flow of convincing creativity and, above all maybe, that warmth that makes the reader truly care - and deeply - about the fate of the people she creates. I am reminded constantly of her compatriot, Edna O'Brien in her first trio of Irish novels, "The Country Girls" and "Girl with Green Eyes" in particular. I've loved reading "Hood". For me, Ms Donaghue is a major discovery, a writer to be followed and cherished. I fully intend to move on to her other novels, several of which now await me on my Kindle.
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