Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Kindle Price: £4.99

Save £4.00 (44%)

includes VAT*
* Unlike print books, digital books are subject to VAT.

These promotions will be applied to this item:

Some promotions may be combined; others are not eligible to be combined with other offers. For details, please see the Terms & Conditions associated with these promotions.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

An Honourable Man by [Slovo, Gillian]
Kindle App Ad

An Honourable Man Kindle Edition

4.1 out of 5 stars 18 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
£4.99

Kindle Books from 99p
Load up your Kindle library before your next holiday -- browse over 500 Kindle Books on sale from 99p until 31 August, 2016. Shop now

Product Description

Review

'Slovo's descriptions are stunning, the simplicity of her language conjuring images of visceral vividness. John is a terrific creation . . . An ambitious and accomplished novel' --Guardian

'A real corker . . . Slovo writes with gusto and a terrific sense of period' --Daily Mail

'A restrained and elegant novel . . . Rich and memorable' --Sunday Telegraph

'Beautifully drawn . . . wonderfully readable'
--Metro

Book Description

* A big and important Victorian novel set in London and the Sudan from Gillian Slovo, a major international writer

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 457 KB
  • Print Length: 353 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 1844086658
  • Publisher: Virago (5 Jan. 2012)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0065JMS8W
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars 18 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #125,574 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images or tell us about a lower price?


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
An Honourable Man
I really liked Gillian Slovo's Ice Road. It was a titanic book, an absolutely gripping epic. I bought this on the back of Ice Road and was disappointed. It's pedestrian and a bit of a chore to read. A poor cross between Kipling and Faber. I'm reading her earlier book, The Betyrayal, at the moment. This has it's faults but is a much better read.
Comment 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
A straightforward historical novel offering a dramatic retelling of Wolesley's expedition of 1884/5 to rescue General Gordon, besieged at Khartoum. Readable and page-turning though it is, I had expected something more layered and nuanced from Slovo (like her Orange-shortlisted 'Ice Road' which I enjoyed immensely). It was interesting to read about an event in history I knew little about, but I don't feel the novel had a great deal to say beyond that.
Khartoum, we are told, is a large city full of bazaars and people yet I never got any sense of it being more than a small fort; similarly Slovo tells us about the trek across the desert yet fails to convey any sense of scale. In terms of the plot and themes I felt there were lots of missed opportunities. Overall, it passed the time well enough but was rather forgettable.
Comment 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By S Riaz HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 7 April 2013
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
This historical novel is set in 1885, where General Gordon is besieged at Khartoum. The story is told from the point of view of three people - Will, a young boy who has accompanied General Gordon, Dr John Clarke who has joined the expedition to try to rescue Gordon and Clarke's wife Mary, who is resentful at his leaving her alone. Mary is a very emotional young woman, her very un-Victorian demeanour causing her husband John to sometimes fetch her a small dose of laudanum to calm her. Unfortunately, he has left her isolated and with the beginning of a drug addiction.

During the novel we follow events at Khartoum, with Wolseley's expedition and back in London. I felt that both Will and Mary worked well as characters, although I found John Clarke's motives a little harder to fathom. However, it was nice to read a historical novel that is set firmly in the time of the story and does not use the current vogue for having a dual storyline in the past and the present. I also really enjoyed the use of a running argument in the Times letter pages between journalist William Stead and A Bartholomew, the Chairman of the Huddersfield Anti-Slavery Society about the events in Sudan and the campaign to try to rescue General Gordon. This gave a clear view of the different viewpoints at the time in a way which made sense, but was not obstructive to the plot.

Overall, I really enjoyed this novel. It is not a time period I know much about, but I found the characters and events very interesting. I have never read anything by Gilliam Slovo before, but I am keen to discover more of her work.
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Gillian Slovo's novel weaves together three different, though linked, stories. The first is based on an actual event, the fall of Khartoum and the creation of that supreme imperial martyr, General Gordon. The second is a tale of a fictional doctor, John Clarke, who accompanied the Gordon relief expedition in its trek across the desert, winning a victory against the Mahdists at Abu Clea that compensated a little for the disaster at Khartoum, but failing to save Gordon himself. Finally, on the domestic level, the battle of the doctor's wife Mary with the personal demon unleashed by her addiction to laudanum.

Uniting these very different stories is the common thread of self-delusion in the search for personal fulfilment. Slovo's Gordon is a man hovering on the brink of madness as the siege tightens around his beleaguered forces; his irascible, inconsistent and wholly irrational behaviour is a prelude to his surrender to the attraction of the sacrifice of self in the linked causes of Christianity and Empire. Dr Clarke, not a militarily man, is nevertheless stirred by patriotic feelings to respond to the call to save Gordon, while his wife is seduced by the treacherous cure for unhappiness offered by a highly addictive drug and initially prescribed by her husband as a wrong-headed act of kindness. In the background, the real-life journalist C T Stead acts as an evil genie, luring the nation into embarking upon an ultimately fruitless task, and influencing in some way or other each of main characters in this book. The quoted excerpts from editorials and comments in his `Pall Mall Gazette' give a flavour of his style of journalistic propaganda that provoked such a blizzard of claims and counter-claims in the contemporary London Press during the autumn and winter of 1885-6.
Read more ›
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Don't try to read this book on the tube as you may miss your stop! That's what happened to me as I was so immersed in the story of John Clarke, a London physician who volunteers for duty on a British expedition to Khartoum in 1884, and finds himself delirious and nearly dying of thirst during a camel trek across the Sahara, that I lost track of where I was. Clarke's gripping story is only one of the narrative strands in this novel. We also follow his wife's descent into laudanum addiction and the lower depths of Victorian London as she struggles to cope with her husband's absence. And Slovo takes us inside the gates of the besieged city of Khartoum as General Gordon attempts to hold off the forces of the Mahdi. Cutting with dizzying rapidity from drawing room to desert to the increasingly desperate plight of Gordon and his men, An Honourable Man is a thrilling ride from start to finish.
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews

click to open popover