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Homo Aestheticus: The Invention of Taste in the Democratic Age Hardcover – 1 Dec 1993

5.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 280 pages
  • Publisher: University of Chicago Press (1 Dec. 1993)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0226244598
  • ISBN-13: 978-0226244594
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 2.3 x 22.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,913,972 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

About the Author

Luc Ferry is a philosopher and the author of the national bestseller A Brief History of Thought. From 2002 to 2004 he served as France's minister of national education. He has been awarded the Prix Medicis, Prix Jean-Jacques-Rousseau, and Prix Aujourd'hui, in addition to being an officer of the French Legion of Honor and a knight of the Order of Arts and Letters. He lives in Paris.

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Format: Hardcover
Luc Ferry is a contemporary French philosopher who breaks from the "norm". While the establishment flatters itself in an anti-American free for all, he conducts a serious reflection upon the potentialities of a truly democratic culture. What is a work of art? Only recently has this question been raised with real interest and intensity. In ancient times, the answer appeared self-evident, one simply referred to the absolute authority in such matters: tradition. A work of art was intended to reflect the traditional world order. It derived from this expectation its sacredness as well as its stability. Egyptian illustration, for instance, stayed essentially unchanged and unquestioned for thousands of years: what was beautiful was what was sacred, and what was sacred was what followed "The Canon". Today, many of us refuse all given traditions, all given world orders, all given canons. Rather than having inherited a given cosmos, we have inherited a democratic spirit that questions the authority of tradition. We no longer expect works of art to be the sacred reflections of an ordered universe, but the secular reflections of an individual, be he or she a "genius". But does this imply artistic judgement are just a matter of "feelings" («to each their own taste"). Is the quality of a work of art entirely relative? Can there be a democratic cosmos (starting from man rather than from a given model), and works of art that reflect it? What are the foundations of a truly democratic culture? In Homo Aestheticus Luc Ferry addresses these problems, and traces with remarkable clarity a number of important moments in the history of Aesthetics: from the classicists, to the romantics, to Kant; from Hegel to Nietzsche to Heidegaar. An important book for anyone who is concerned with the present evolution towards a "McCulture". An important book for anyone wearied by the monotonous newness of contemporary art.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0x9c76eac8) out of 5 stars 1 review
18 of 18 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9cb32c84) out of 5 stars Homo Aestheticus: art and culture in a democratic world. 8 Aug. 1999
By Raphael Jenks (roodoo@rocketmail.com) - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Luc Ferry is a contemporary French philosopher who breaks from the "norm". While the establishment flatters itself in an anti-American free for all, he conducts a serious reflection upon the potentialities of a truly democratic culture. What is a work of art? Only recently has this question been raised with real interest and intensity. In ancient times, the answer appeared self-evident, one simply referred to the absolute authority in such matters: tradition. A work of art was intended to reflect the traditional world order. It derived from this expectation its sacredness as well as its stability. Egyptian illustration, for instance, stayed essentially unchanged and unquestioned for thousands of years: what was beautiful was what was sacred, and what was sacred was what followed "The Canon". Today, many of us refuse all given traditions, all given world orders, all given canons. Rather than having inherited a given cosmos, we have inherited a democratic spirit that questions the authority of tradition. We no longer expect works of art to be the sacred reflections of an ordered universe, but the secular reflections of an individual, be he or she a "genius". But does this imply artistic judgement are just a matter of "feelings" («to each their own taste"). Is the quality of a work of art entirely relative? Can there be a democratic cosmos (starting from man rather than from a given model), and works of art that reflect it? What are the foundations of a truly democratic culture? In Homo Aestheticus Luc Ferry addresses these problems, and traces with remarkable clarity a number of important moments in the history of Aesthetics: from the classicists, to the romantics, to Kant; from Hegel to Nietzsche to Heidegaar. An important book for anyone who is concerned with the present evolution towards a "McCulture". An important book for anyone wearied by the monotonous newness of contemporary art.
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