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A Home at the End of the World Paperback – 15 Nov 1998

4.3 out of 5 stars 22 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Picador USA (15 Nov. 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0312202318
  • ISBN-13: 978-0312202316
  • Product Dimensions: 13.9 x 2.5 x 20.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (22 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,715,448 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product description

Review

"Lyrical . . . Memorable and accomplished."-- "The New York Times Book Review"
"Novels don't come more deeply felt than Cunningham's extraordinary four-character study . . . The writing [is] a constant pleasure, flowing and yet dense with incisive images and psychological nuance."-- Matthew Gilbert, "The Boston Globe"
"The story of Jonathan, Clare, Bobby, and Alice is also the story of the 70's and 80's in America-- and vice versa. It is destined to last."-- David Leavitt, author of "The Marble Quilt"
"Cunningham has written a novel that all but reads itself."-- "The Washington Post Book World"
"Once in a great while, there appears a novel so spellbinding in its beauty and sensitivity that the reader devours it nearly whole, in great greedy gulps, and feels stretched sore afterwards, having been expanded and filled. Such a book is [this one]."-- Sherry Rosenthal, "San Diego Tribune"
"Luminous with the wonders and anxieties that make childhood mysterious . . . A Home at the End of the World is a remarkable accomplishment."-- Laura Frost, "San Francisco Review"
"Brilliant and satisfying . . . As good as anything I've read in years . . . Hope in the midst of tragedy is a fragile thing, and Cunningham carries it with masterful care."-- Gayle Kidder, "San Diego Union"
"Exquisitely written . . . Lyrical . . . An important book."-- "Charleston Sunday News and Courier"
"Cunningham writes with power and delicacy . . . We come to feel that we know Jonathan, Bobby, and Clare as if we lived with them; yet each one retains the mystery that in people is called soul, and in fiction is called art."--Richard Eder," The LosAngeles Times"


"Lyrical . . . Memorable and accomplished."—"The New York Times Book Review"
"Novels don't come more deeply felt than Cunningham's extraordinary four-character study . . . The writing [is] a constant pleasure, flowing and yet dense with incisive images and psychological nuance."—Matthew Gilbert, "The Boston Globe"
"The story of Jonathan, Clare, Bobby, and Alice is also the story of the 70's and 80's in America—and vice versa. It is destined to last."—David Leavitt, author of "The Marble Quilt"
"Cunningham has written a novel that all but reads itself."—"The Washington Post Book World "
"Once in a great while, there appears a novel so spellbinding in its beauty and sensitivity that the reader devours it nearly whole, in great greedy gulps, and feels stretched sore afterwards, having been expanded and filled. Such a book is [this one]."—Sherry Rosenthal, "San Diego Tribune"
"Luminous with the wonders and anxieties that make childhoo

"Lyrical . . . Memorable and accomplished."--"The New York Times Book Review"
"Novels don't come more deeply felt than Cunningham's extraordinary four-character study . . . The writing [is] a constant pleasure, flowing and yet dense with incisive images and psychological nuance."--Matthew Gilbert, "The Boston Globe"
"The story of Jonathan, Clare, Bobby, and Alice is also the story of the 70's and 80's in America--and vice versa. It is destined to last."--David Leavitt, author of "The Marble Quilt"
"Cunningham has written a novel that all but reads itself."--"The Washington Post Book World "
"Once in a great while, there appears a novel so spellbinding in its beauty and sensitivity that the reader devours it nearly whole, in great greedy gulps, and feels stretched sore afterwards, having been expanded and filled. Such a book is [this one]."--Sherry Rosenthal, "San Diego Tribune"
"Luminous with the wonders and anxieties that make childhood mysterious . . . A Home at the End of the World is a remarkable accomplishment."--Laura Frost, "San Francisco Review"
"Brilliant and satisfying . . . As good as anything I've read in years . . . Hope in the midst of tragedy is a fragile thing, and Cunningham carries it with masterful care."--Gayle Kidder, "San Diego Union"
"Exquisitely written . . . Lyrical . . . An important book."--"Charleston Sunday News and Courier"
"Cunningham writes with power and delicacy . . . We come to feel that we know Jonathan, Bobby, and Clare as if we lived with them; yet each one retains the mystery that in people is called soul, and in fiction is called art."--Richard Eder," The Los Angeles Times"


Lyrical . . . Memorable and accomplished. "The New York Times Book Review"

Novels don't come more deeply felt than Cunningham's extraordinary four-character study . . . The writing [is] a constant pleasure, flowing and yet dense with incisive images and psychological nuance. "Matthew Gilbert, The Boston Globe"

The story of Jonathan, Clare, Bobby, and Alice is also the story of the 70's and 80's in America--and vice versa. It is destined to last. "David Leavitt, author of The Marble Quilt"

Cunningham has written a novel that all but reads itself. "The Washington Post Book World"

Once in a great while, there appears a novel so spellbinding in its beauty and sensitivity that the reader devours it nearly whole, in great greedy gulps, and feels stretched sore afterwards, having been expanded and filled. Such a book is [this one]. "Sherry Rosenthal, San Diego Tribune"

Luminous with the wonders and anxieties that make childhood mysterious . . . A Home at the End of the World is a remarkable accomplishment. "Laura Frost, San Francisco Review"

Brilliant and satisfying . . . As good as anything I've read in years . . . Hope in the midst of tragedy is a fragile thing, and Cunningham carries it with masterful care. "Gayle Kidder, San Diego Union"

Exquisitely written . . . Lyrical . . . An important book. "Charleston Sunday News and Courier"

Cunningham writes with power and delicacy . . . We come to feel that we know Jonathan, Bobby, and Clare as if we lived with them; yet each one retains the mystery that in people is called soul, and in fiction is called art. "Richard Eder, The Los Angeles Times""

About the Author

Michael Cunningham is "one of our very best writers" (Richard Eder, "The Los Angeles Times"). An excerpt from "A Home at the End of the World" was published in "The New Yorker," chosen for "Best American Short Stories 1989," and featured on NPR's Selected Shorts. He is the author of two other novels, "Flesh and Blood" and "The Hours." He lives in New York.

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Two boys grow up; they are close, they are victims of their hormones, like all boys, but perhaps things go a little too far. Certainly Jonathan's mother is suspicious of Bobby. Especially after she interrupts a moment of experimentation as they sit in Jonathan's car. Jonathan's mother, Alice, is quite important in this book as an onlooker, she disapproves of Bobby who isn't quite of her class, yet when her son leaves for college she gives Bobby a lot of help when he becomes interested in setting up a small restaurant.

Cunningham is good with characterisation and plot and there is a deep feeling for people who don't fit easily into the roles thrust upon them. Bobby and Jonathan don't meet again for a few years, when Bobby moves to New York and meets Jonathan accidently on the street. His early academic promise has not survived and he is living with Clare, a designer while writing a food column for a New York paper. There evolves a complex three-way relationship. They talk about themselves and their feelings constantly and even Bobby, the least garrulous, is drawn into their serial wrangling.

Michael Cunningham is a sensitive and generous writer with a great deal of insight, but I do think the situation becomes overheated and might have been handled with more dispatch. It is also oddly vague about some things - how they divide the work in running their new restaurant, or the reappearance of an old friend of Jonathan's who has become ill with AIDS. There is the feeling of ticking boxes, though in other areas the three friends are unconventional to say the least. I grew a little tired of them all towards the last third of the book. But it is nicely sited in the zeitgeist of metropolitan love in the Big Apple.
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Format: Paperback
First book I read from Michael Cunningham and absolutely loved his style. The author managed to cram so much into this novel, every two pages you have to stop and just reflect on that nugget of knowledge or thought he just exposed through one of the characters. The story is absolutely flawless and once you started there is no putting down. I read this on the coach 6 hours in a row non-stop and it was one enjoyable journey.
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Format: Paperback
Michael Cunningham may have won the Pulitzer for The Hours, but A Home at The End of The World is, for me, his best novel. Beautifully written, with an intensely spare lyrical voice, Cunningham examines that hardest of questions - when exactly is it that we have to grow up and take responsibility for our decisions?
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Format: Paperback
This coming-of-age novel is narrated in the first person, with the narrator changing in each chapter. Bobby and Jonathan are the main narrators, but several chapters are narrated by Alice, Jonathan's mother, and Clare.

Bobby had grown up in a home in suburban Cleveland, Ohio during the 1960s and 1970s where partying and drugs were a recurring theme. He has already witnessed the death of his mother and beloved older brother by the time he befriends Jonathan, who comes from a sheltered family. After Bobby finds his father is dead, Jonathan's family takes him in.

Bobby and Jonathan become best friends, and also experiment sexually. The two eventually lose touch, but meet up again in their 20s in 1980s New York, where Bobby moves in with Jonathan and his eccentric roommate Clare. Clare had planned to have a baby with openly gay Jonathan, but Bobby and Clare become lovers, while Jonathan still has feelings for Bobby. Clare and Bobby have a baby and move to a country home together with Jonathan.

The trio form their own unusual family, questioning traditional definitions of family and love, while dealing with the complications of their love triangle.
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Format: Paperback
All I can say is read it and listen to Bobby. He knows all. This book finds me where ever I am in the world. Just found it in Rabat, Morocco. I hope it speaks to you like it spoke to me. It will find you at the right time in your life.
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Format: Paperback
"A Home at the End of the World" has to be Michael Cunningham's finest book to date. In a sea of bland coming of age novels this book leaps miles ahead and is a must for anyone who enjoys reading alternative gay fiction. The core of this book is not, however, about homosexuality it takes a refreshing look at how people from differing backgroungs come together to forge a life together in a not so successful manner. All I can say is, read this book, it's fantastic!!
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Of all the books I've read recently on the topic of "gay" (a series of Edmund White + My policeman + London triptych+ Like people in history + Evrybody loves you+ Flesh and Blood+ The front runner) it is, by far, the one I prefer.
Why? Because the life energy that carries this book does not even have to ask about literary quality. There is a force to fight against adversity, to try to be happy, whether you are a man or a woman, to achieve in his or her love life, with unconventional means, for the time being can, and by developing, inventing forms of life, couple, two, three, that approach, moving away, where each partner, according to the periods closer to one or the other, with, sometimes, the overnight guests. And then distant removals for the time it takes, and sometimes for the rest of life. Not to mention the aging parents with whom we keep relationships.
Perhaps I was particularly sensitive to the strength of the relationship of a lifetime (well, we do not know, because there are still things to live at the end of the book) that is anchored in a friendship of childhood becoming a kind of love for life. It's not perfect, but however, this is love. They are loves. And their bear life of quite a lot of people.
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