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Hollywood by [Bukowski, Charles]
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Hollywood Kindle Edition

4.2 out of 5 stars 23 customer reviews

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Length: 250 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Product Description

Review

"Full of entertaining vignettes of celebrities." (The Times)

"No other book gets as close to the corrupt heart of American movie-making." (Guardian)

"A laureate of American low life." (Time)

From the Back Cover

Never before published in the UK

'No other book gets as close to the corrupt heart of American moviemaking.'

Guardian

There are many scandalous books about life in Hollywood, but none as poetic and dangerous as this, a fictional chronicle of Bukowski's experiences writing the screenplay for Barfly. Henry Chinaski has a penchant for booze, women and horse-racing. On his precarious journey from poet to screenwriter he encounters a host of well-known

stars and lays bare the absurdity and egotism of the film industry. With unmatchable Bukowski verve, Hollywood is deadpan, touching and hilarious.

'The thing about Bukowski is, when you read what he has to say, he's right.' Sean Penn

'Full of entertaining vignettes of celebrities.' The Times

'Bukowski's voice is insistent and affirming but it also has the humble durability of someone who won't stay down . . . His stories help keep people alive.' Independent


Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 566 KB
  • Print Length: 250 pages
  • Publisher: Canongate Books; Main edition (25 Sept. 2009)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B002VNFNEM
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars 23 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #79,471 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Charles Bukowski's minimal style, always egotistical and mostly alcohol affected is concerned in this book with his succesful attempt to see a screenplay (for Barfly) become a reality.
Names are changed but it is fun to read Bukowski's views on the movers and shakers in 1980's Hollywood.
The womanising and drinking are subdued (due to being married) and even a hedonistic rebel such as Bukowski comes across as conventional compared to the weirdness and double-dealing that appears to be Hollywood.
Not neccesarily a good first Bukowski read (try Post Office or Factotum) but nevertheless good fun.
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A good novel from a well loved author, Bukowski serves up another dish of gritty, rough, hard nose drinking antics. The main theme revolves around writing and producing a film about a period of Bukowski's life. Not as reeling and rolling as some of his earlier masterpieces such as Post office, yet still well worth a read and a must for any Bukowski fan.
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Bukowski is a great writer and this return to his semi-autobiographical character Chinanski is a pretty straight forward affair. It is always good to read a bit of Bukowski, makes me feel better about people and how ridiculous we all are and here he reveals us at our most ridiculous, making movies.

It's interesting to read about the actors he comes across, who are easily identifiable if you know about Barfly (the resulting film)and hes as lewd and crude and drunk as ever. The great thing with Bukowski is between the women, gambling, drinking, fighting and writing there will be a page or passage that cuts through all that and grabs you by the heart revealing humanity in all its fragility.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Another great book from Bukowski. This one is more about the insanity of Hollywood than his own personal madness, or maybe just that no one persons insanity compares to the collective insanity of the world of film. Maybe not his best but it's good to read about a more settled man than the Chiniski of post office, factotum and Women. If you like Bukowski check out his favourite author John Fante and the Bandini Qaurtet
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Format: Paperback
The narrative is, as one might expect, about filming Bukowski's life or at any rate a slice of it in what may or may not be a comment at how 'Barfly' was made into a creditable film. What interests me though, as always in Bukowski, is the way an outsider looks at the life of more 'normal' peole while carrying on his more simple life. So it's two-in-one really: a look at Hollywoodland one who knows it as well as seeing Tinseltown as we aren't used to seeing it. "Six suburbs in search of a City"? Well L.A. is not, of course, a normal place by any standards and the idiosyncratic p.o.v. makes it seems doubly strange. Very entertaining and written in a terse, knowing style. Well worth a go. As is 'Barfly.'
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By A Customer on 8 July 1996
Format: Paperback
Charles Bukowski goes semi-commercial to the dismay of many old
fans, the book offers a mainstream version of FACTOTUM. But the writing is of
higher quality, and Buk shines through. Look for celebs in the book under
false names... Mickey Rourke, Faye Dunaway... check the credits of the movie
and then re-read!
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Format: Paperback
In this novel Bukowski's alter-ego, Henry Chinaski writes a screenplay which is filmed in Hollywood. The book is a thinly veiled biography and charts the makings of the film Barfly which starred Micky Rourke and Faye Dunaway.

Part of Bukowski's charm is that he writes simply. However, whilst this works brilliantly in books like Post Office and Factotum, it works less well here. This is because the subject matter of the early novels features Chinaski as a down and out in dead end jobs - an existence that most of us are unfamiliar with. In this novel, Bukowski charts the excesses of Hollywood, which whilst amusing and shocking are not unfamiliar. The difficulty is that we are saturated with images of Hollywood and familiar with exposees of it. Amongst this, Bukowski struggles to tell us anything new.

The parts of the book that I enjoyed most were the sections away from Hollywood. Bukowski writes engagingly about his reasons for betting on the track and the psychology of those who attend. His visits to the local ghettoes expose a different type of madness to the Hollywood excess.

This remains an entertaining book and Bukowski is aware of the criticisms that some of his fans might make. He is aware that he is enjoying material wealth and whilst enjoying this worries that he is selling out. He is also aware of the limitations of his style. He quotes others accusing him of writing simply because he himself is simple. Despite this, Bukowski's voice is engaging in its bottomless pessimism and its self depriciating tone. This book is worth reading, its just not one of his best.
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As much as this pains me to say, “Hollywood” was a massive disappointment. The book has no energy, Chinaski is old, tired and dare I say, a sellout.
As always, Chinaski is Bukowski's alter ego and that may be the problem. Bukowski was living comfortably, money in the bank and a solid relationship with a good woman. Bukowski just doesn't work as... well happy, I guess. His writing is stale, dull, with only brief flashes of his “old” brilliance. The book is about his “adventure” in “Hollywood”, adapting one of his novels for the big screen. The book is filled with little “stories” about how weird the people in the movie business are, with made up names of course, but its all terribly “empty” and in the end it all feels shallow. The whole book seems like Bukowski is going through the motions, writing like its “a job” and not because he actually has anything to say. Gone is the despair, the hunger, the quiet rage at the “machine”. Nothing is is remotely deep or has any meaning. “Hollywood” by Bukowski is as superficial and vacuous as the business it depicts and as much about the “bottom line” too. Its a tired exercise by a tired man. With his last shred of... shall we say self awareness, Bukowski struggles to spend the book looking down on those “crazy Hollywood types” when deep down, both him and the reader know that no matter how he tries to hide it, even from himself, he became one of them and ultimately one of the “system”.
As a piece of entertainment, “Hollywood” also has little to offer. The usual cast of over the top characters are everywhere but here, unlike in his other novels, their use seems desperate and not very convincing. Bukowski goes to extremes to show their “weirdness” but it all feels very bland and there isn't much of his usual dry humor either.
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