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Hide

Hide

23 Nov 2010
4.7 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews

£7.99 (VAT included if applicable)
 
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1
8:39
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2
5:33
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3
4:19
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4
4:34
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6:41
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2:35
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5:56
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0:47
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8:32
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10
3:10
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Format: MP3 Download
This is wildly different to anything Foetus has done before and can only really be measured against other highly pretentious concept albums with eight-minute long orchestral tracks, although I can't think of anything else that mixes Latin operatic vocals with metal and bhangra!

It's more a successor to GASH in terms of sound, but a good deal more soundtrack-y and the first track is quite hard work until it really gets going. Other songs are lighter and poppier than Foetus fans will be used to, but work well in contrast with the monster epics like Oilfields and You're Trying To Break Me.

Go in there with an open mind, and you might find your favourite Foetus album yet - but don't expect easy listening. File under "challenging but rewarding".
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Format: MP3 Download
Experimental music but with recognisable structures, less caustic but with no pavlov formula, as elements of the Beatles, Classical, Bhangra are all stamped with the Foetus ink, then reassembled from cut ups, finely chopped into epic paens. The tortured vocals have been toned, rather than tamed but there is little to whistle until the third or track.

The first one forms into an Indian dance from its European classical beginnings, whilst the second grows from a spy chase. Then it all quietens into a soundtrack of cut up assembled cascading choirs.

Then the third is a drift across the clouds to the Beatles psychotic worlds of laid back tinkling on dreamers, before it all builds again on string rhythms.

Elements of Boulez and the creepy soundtrack music, play throughout, guitars crash as they enter the fray all sounding as the adrenaline pumping of massed armies gathering to confront each other over a scored musical.
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By Sordel TOP 500 REVIEWER on 10 Aug. 2011
Format: MP3 Download
Up until Hide, the biggest orchestral sound to appear on a Foetus album was probably "Mutapump" from 1995's Gash. It was a sound that made it appear that someone had taken a pretty decent song and then combined the forces of several symphony orchestras to bring it to life. If possible, Hide has gone further.

Foetus is J.G.Thirlwell's rock brand: the snarling vocals that appear in "You're Trying To Break Me" are its trademark. Twenty years ago every couplet would have been clearly audible, though, and now they are processed and overlaid with masses of samples until the voice comes close to being drowned out in a miasma of instrumental noise. Numerous string sections appear to be playing at one time. Nothing ever sounded exactly like Foetus, but now - short of combining on a single stage a couple of thousand musicans - nothing *can*.

Choirs also make an appearance on this album. On "Oilfields", for example, they intone those signature couplets while Thirlwell himself sings of a fireball in the sky against soaring massed strings. Yet the most entertaining song here is "The Ballad of Sisyphus T. Jones", which uses extensively the same sort of Western Movie soundtrack pastiche that Thirlwell tried out on his soundtrack to the Venture Bros. cartoon. Thirlwell stands right on the line between wit and pomposity: it's a ground that he has made his own.

While listeners will initially spend most of their time disentangling Hide's epic soundworlds, this is a big, warm-hearted album that is far distant from the clinical ambient horror of some of Thirlwell's recent sound experimentation (such as Manorexia's Dinoflagellate Blooms). There is even a (sort of) ballad here, in the form of "Here Comes The Rain". which bathes the album for a while in shadowy lushness.

Yet another breakthrough album, then, from contemporary music's most accomplished sonic tinkerer.
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