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Hidden Empire: The Saga Of Seven Suns - Book One by [Anderson, Kevin J.]
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Hidden Empire: The Saga Of Seven Suns - Book One Kindle Edition

3.3 out of 5 stars 77 customer reviews
Book 1 of 7 in Saga of Seven Suns (7 Book Series)

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Length: 474 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Page Flip: Enabled

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Product description

About the Author

Kevin J. Anderson has over 15 million books in print in 27 languages worldwide. He is the author of the X-Files novels Ground Zero, Ruins, and Antibodies, as well as the Jedi Academy trilogy of Star Wars novels - the three bestselling SF novels of 1994. He is also writing the international bestselling prequels to Frank Herbert's monumental Dune series, with Frank's son, Brian Herbert. He has won, or been nominated for, the Nebula Award, Bram Stoker Award, Reader's Choice Award from the Science Fiction Book Club, and many others.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1474 KB
  • Print Length: 474 pages
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster UK; New Ed edition (14 April 2011)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0743220447
  • ISBN-13: 978-0743220446
  • ASIN: B004UFTT4Y
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 3.3 out of 5 stars 77 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #83,634 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer reviews

Top customer reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is a incredibly enjoyable read that always keeps you hungry for more. Kevin.J.Anderson writes such incredible and exiting stories that keep you waiting on very turn
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Format: Paperback
Yes, this is space opera à la pulp. You might argue that it is dated, and you would be right to point the finger at shallow characterisation. The dialogue is stilted. You could even fairly argue that it doesn't belong in the first rank of Grand Cosmos storytelling.

However . . . it is nonetheless a guilty pleasure page-turner ne plus ultra that only the snobbish, jaded and grumpy could fail to be titivated by.

In attempting to grapple with the scale of the universe Anderson's macro-story necessarily reduces and homogenises civilisations to characters. Populating each world with individually credible and fully-fleshed, barked, icy, liquid and fiery beings would have required a series twice the already considerable length of the Seven Suns Saga.

This is a broad-brush, impressionistic work best appreciated by rapid reading without over-close inspection of the detail. By that measure, it's rollicking entertainment.

Pointless to waste keytime comparing it to any of a score of writers whose SF demands line-by-line appreciation or whose worlds teem with engrossing micro-detail: this is just a big dumb rocket of a thing that zigzags entertainingly enough through giant vistas.

As holiday reading, it's conveniently packaged to blitz a book a day on the beach and finish the saga on the plane home. Happy days.
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Format: Paperback
I agree with most of the previous reviewers.. This book is actually an okay start. Unfortunately I am a junkie for completion so I went ahead and ordered the rest of the series which quickly becomes really dire stuff.

Starting off with the good:

A lot of people complained about the short chapters - I don't mind them. I have kids so it's harder to get time to read and the short chapters make the book easy to read over your cornflakes in the morning, etc - 5 mins here and there gets you through it.

He has constructed a nice, if simplistic universe here - all the standard ingredients: human/alien empires/colony worlds/miner race (roamers) and mysterious artifacts & aliens. In the early books, the King versus Chairman thing is an okay interplay.

The bad:
Okay I know I'm reading sci-fi so things don't have to make sense but the sheer amount of impossible things that happen beggars belief and will have you gnashing your teeth at times, and character depth just isn't there.

- Scale is way off. Planets are like villages in the wild-west. The average population of a planet seems to be a few hundred "hardy" colonists. If you land on a world, anywhere, you will soon bump into the colonists that are on it.

- Central characters keep getting weird and "wonderful" powers for no good reason. In this series, if you fall into a sun you are more likely to become some kind of a ridiculous fire-creature than to die. The plot seems to rely on impossible coincidences and outlandish magic rather than clever writing.

- Each member of each species is identical to each other. For example all the roamers have the same principles and beliefs.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Not quite finished this one yet, but so far a very interesting conceptual universe.

Set, as usual, in our universe but in the future. Based around the idea of humans and all their eccentricities with similar levels of tech to what we have, with the exception of interstellar FTL travel gifted by a benevolent alien race.

An usual mix of mysterious dead aliens, political intruiges and ominous portents arer building this up to be a rather good story.

Also, I've always been a fan of Andersons writing, but this is the first of his own concepts I've read, and I'm not dissapointed.
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Format: Paperback
This is the best of the 3 1/2 books of this series that I dragged my sorry ass through. I bought the first four together so I persevered with this one in the hope things would improve and waded through each subsequent one with the deluded idea that not to would waste the time and money spent on the previous ones. It starts at a high point of mediocrity and plummets to depths of repetitive drivel hitherto unheard of.

I guess the original premise has some merit but the execution is insulting.

There are gaping holes in everything - plot, characters, basic science, common sense (I know its sci-fi so we have to be somewhat flexible but there has to be a line drawn somewhere and it's a line that this author scarcely noticed in his rear view mirror)

The 4th book was so awful it was painful so I abandoned it with an irritation that I still feel to this day. I have read many hundreds of books and enjoyed all of them to some degree except these.

Do not under any circumstances buy this book. I have burned mine, buried it and salted the ground so nothing will grow there again.
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Format: Paperback
...space opera it is - sadly, Night's Dawn it isn't.
Anderson starts off well. He has obviously put a lot of thought into the creation of his universe. There are some quite ingenious races and ideas: a race of humans ("Therons") who can communicate telepathically through a symbiotic relationship with alien trees; a race of aliens ("Ildirans") who have similar powers through their emperor. Other concepts are more mundane (not to say derivative), such as a dead alien race whose archaeological artefacts hold the key to some promising technological advances; mysterious alien robots who you just know are going to turn out to be bad guys and worst of all, comic-book, stereotyped space gypsies, the "Roamers".
There are numerous sub-plots. The archaeologists researching the dead race; the human political chairman manipulating events from behind the scenes, whilst the King is a mere figurehead; the Navy chasing pirates; Theron priests spreading their sentient trees to other planets. In it's multiplicity of sub-plots, Hidden Empire wears it's debt to Night's Dawn clearly on it's sleeve.
On the surface it all sounds good.
Sadly, where Anderson drops the ball is in his characterisation, pacing and dialogue.
The characters all tend to be two-dimensional. There are numerous races and factions, but every Roamer is painted exactly the same as every other Roamer - every Theron is a mirror image of every other Theron - every human-built robot is a C3-P0 clone (unsurprisingly, Anderson has written some Star Wars novels).
The subplots all seem to be very hurried.
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