FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 5 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
The Hidden Brain: How Our... has been added to your Basket

Dispatch to:
To see addresses, please
Or
Please enter a valid UK postcode.
Or
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by ThriftBooks-USA
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: All items ship from the USA.  Arrival time is usually 2-3 weeks. Book has appearance of light use with no easily noticeable wear. Spend Less. Read More. Your satisfaction is guaranteed.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The Hidden Brain: How Our Unconscious Minds Elect Presidents, Control Markets, Wage Wars, and Save Our Lives Paperback – 31 Aug 2010

5.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review

See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
£12.56
£6.27 £7.07
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more

Man Booker International Prize 2017
A Horse Walks Into a Bar has won the Man Booker International Prize 2017. Learn more
£12.56 FREE Delivery in the UK. Only 5 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Frequently bought together

  • The Hidden Brain: How Our Unconscious Minds Elect Presidents, Control Markets, Wage Wars, and Save Our Lives
  • +
  • Thinking, Fast and Slow
Total price: £20.25
Buy the selected items together

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.



Product details

  • Paperback: 270 pages
  • Publisher: Spiegel & Grau (31 Aug. 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0385525222
  • ISBN-13: 978-0385525220
  • Product Dimensions: 13.2 x 1.4 x 20.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 245,407 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • If you are a seller for this product, would you like to suggest updates through seller support?

Product description

Review

"In The Hidden Brain, one of America's best science journalists describes how our unconscious minds influence everything from criminal trials to charitable giving, from suicide bombers to presidential elections. The Hidden Brain is a smart and engaging exploration of the science behind the headlines" "and of the little man behind the screen. Don't miss it." Daniel Gilbert, author of Stumbling on "Happiness
"
"Shankar Vedantam brings his critical eye to a question that has haunted scientists and writers for centuries: Does the unconscious matter, and if so, how? With a light touch, the book takes us through the complicated landscape of research on psychology and human behavior. We come away not only understanding how we act, but Vedantam moves past mainstream economic reasoning to shed light on the relationships we create with each other. The book addresses the madness and beauty of our struggles to create a moral and just world."" "Sudhir Venkatesh, author of" Gang Leader for a Day: A Rogue Sociologist Takes to theStreets
"

"From the Hardcover edition.""

-In The Hidden Brain, one of America's best science journalists describes how our unconscious minds influence everything from criminal trials to charitable giving, from suicide bombers to presidential elections. The Hidden Brain is a smart and engaging exploration of the science behind the headlines--and of the little man behind the screen. Don't miss it.---Daniel Gilbert, author of Stumbling on Happiness

-Shankar Vedantam brings his critical eye to a question that has haunted scientists and writers for centuries: Does the unconscious matter, and if so, how? With a light touch, the book takes us through the complicated landscape of research on psychology and human behavior. We come away not only understanding how we act, but Vedantam moves past mainstream economic reasoning to shed light on the relationships we create with each other. The book addresses the madness and beauty of our struggles to create a moral and just world.- --Sudhir Venkatesh, author of Gang Leader for a Day: A Rogue Sociologist Takes to the Streets

From the Hardcover edition.

"In The Hidden Brain, one of America's best science journalists describes how our unconscious minds influence everything from criminal trials to charitable giving, from suicide bombers to presidential elections. The Hidden Brain is a smart and engaging exploration of the science behind the headlines--and of the little man behind the screen. Don't miss it."--Daniel Gilbert, author of Stumbling on Happiness

"Shankar Vedantam brings his critical eye to a question that has haunted scientists and writers for centuries: Does the unconscious matter, and if so, how? With a light touch, the book takes us through the complicated landscape of research on psychology and human behavior. We come away not only understanding how we act, but Vedantam moves past mainstream economic reasoning to shed light on the relationships we create with each other. The book addresses the madness and beauty of our struggles to create a moral and just world." --Sudhir Venkatesh, author of Gang Leader for a Day: A Rogue Sociologist Takes to the Streets

From the Hardcover edition.

About the Author

Shankar Vedantam is a national correspondent and columnist for the Washington Post and a 2009 Neimann Fellow. He lives in Washington, DC.

From the Hardcover edition.

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
1
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See the customer review
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
And excellent book: clear and accessible.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta) (May include reviews from Early Reviewer Rewards Program)

Amazon.com: 4.1 out of 5 stars 124 reviews
54 of 57 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Meh. Author's own biases brought the book down. 17 Feb. 2015
By Amazon Addict - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
If you read a lot of books in this genre, then this is likely to be a retread of older studies for you. If not, then you might enjoy it. It's an easy read, and there's a lot of fascinating material.

That said, the author's own "hidden" biases are on full display as well. His chapter on racist bias immediately and definitively sets about showing that racism exists - the author relaying his own personal experiences with it as a minority - and then explores why. In fact, he has a couple of chapters that deal with racism in a fairly masterful way. Those are worth a read. However, in the chapter on sexism, he spends a few pages rambling on about how there's no real way to establish in any useful form that sexism is behind any individual incident that involves a woman. He eventually did get it together and pull out of his spiral to discuss sexism as experienced by trans individuals, but not without the disclaimer that a lot of that discrimination might be attributable to bias against alternative sexuality. Having read substantial amounts of - yes, scientific - as well as less rigorous studies into sexism, I found that chapter sloppy and poorly assembled. It was clearly not the priority for him that racism was. And being dismissive of 51% of the global population is probably a poor strategy for success. I'd have more respect for his book if he simply said, "I'm going to focus on racism since it's where my interest lies," and then not addressed sexism at all. Fair enough - we tend to speak to what we know. But to throw in a sloppy, poorly assembled chapter on sexism, and then act as if it could barely be quantified as a societal force - despite the massive crowds of people globally saying otherwise - felt insulting and dismissive. Definitely a turn-off.

All in all, I can't give this a huge thumbs up or down. It's okay. But if you're only going to read one book in this genre, I'd recommend "Mistakes were Made But Not By Me" or "Dataclysm."
13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A necessary read 30 Oct. 2013
By borgy borgy - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
As a retired psychologist one thing I know is that people are way more biased and motivated by non rational elements than they'll ever admit. The discourse on racial bias alone should be taken seriously by anyone who thinks they are not prejudiced (they are!). Gender biases and racial biases and biases from our inability to differentiate the effects of quantity in our thinking are all covered. Vedantam addresses most of these issues, summarizing telling research in a somewhat Gladwellian way but does so very succinctly and thoroughly. I was put off a bit by some of the dramatic flights he used to lead in to an area or to illustrate a point. Some don't really illustrate the point intended. I made the book a little uneven for me but does not negate the importance and need for all to seriously consider the issues he presents. If you are too 'rational' to need to read this, you need to read this.
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Mystifying Unconscious Mind 30 Aug. 2016
By Fuad R Qubein - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Unlike our normal (conscious) brain, which is live and tangible, the unconscious brain, referred to in this book as the "hidden brain", is intangible and elusive. In fact its own existence was in question. Ever since it was given its name (by Friedrich Schiller in 18th century) it was questioned or even rejected by some psychologists. However, its function and influence were evident enough to engage the attention of famous psychologists like Sigmund Freud and Carl Jung who developed the concept and employed it in psychoanalysis and other psychological problems. In fact, Freud made the concept popular and it became one of his main contributions to psychology.

Freud likened the mind to an iceberg with its tip (above the water ) being the conscious mind and the bulk of it (under the water), being the unconscious mind. This is significant as it implies that most of mental work is done by the unconscious mind. Later research and development showed this to be true. Indeed some psychologists believe that only 25 percent of our mind's work is accomplished by our conscious mind. What is curious about this arrangement is that the conscious mind is mostly unaware of the actions of the unconscious mind. This is not only surprising but also mystifying. In other words , after having made a seemingly conscious decision we would be told it was really the hidden brain that had done the work,or at least had guided us to the decision. If someone is told that he does not understand how his mind works he is likely to be offended, yet, this has become an acceptable fact in psychology.

The contents of this unconscious mind have been somewhat of a mystery. Freud thought it is a reservoir containing our feelings, concerns, fears, and memories which are outside the scope of our awareness. The reason they are suppressed down below is because their surfacing might be disturbing or annoying, e.g. like remembering an ugly crime . How can one access this reservoir? One way is through psychoanalysis as Freud had done using the power of reasoning and allowing several sessions to unravel a patient's background. More often the contents surface in dreams or else through hypnosis. On reading about this strange arrangement one cannot help but wonder: Was this an integral part of our creation, or did it evolve in us over time?

Although we are accustomed to think of the unconscious mind at the personal level, the author gives it another dimension by demonstrating its effect in groups and institutions. He does this using anecdotes and case studies. The danger here is that often the anecdote is in itself so exciting that it overshadows the psychological analysis. One issue dealt with here is racial bias which is presumably generated by our unconscious brain. One researcher in Canada, G. Aboud, tried to trace the origin of this issue by showing little children a picture of a white man and a black man. She would tell the little 3-5 years-old stories about a robbery, or any other offending event, and ask the children to point to the possible culprit in the picture. Invariably most of them would point to the black man . No matter how the question was repeated the result was the same. Where did this bias come from? Parents? Teachers? Friends? She wondered. And would it be embedded and sealed in their hidden reservoir until it surfaces later in life creating our modern-day problematic racial discrimination?

Surely, there is a lot more research to be done on this mystifying unconscious mind.
Fuad R. Qubein
August,2016
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Insightful and Informative 8 Sept. 2016
By Amazon Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
A wonderfully insightful book that brings to awareness research outcomes about our subconscious mind. The information may be unsettling to some as it seems to counter your gut intuition. But, because it is research based, it is crucial for citizens to better understand the truth of what underlying factors come to influence on our beliefs and behaviors. An excellent read for all.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars so, what's new? 25 Aug. 2013
By David Williams - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
This book seems to have been written for secondary school students with no background in psychology and no interest in the history of the study of human consciousness. It basically comes off as surprised that people are motivated by hidden and unconscious motivations, as if Freud and the 20th century had never happened. The information is not objectionable but not anything new either. I wish the author had admitted that instead of writing as if he were revealing some surprising new truth.
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know