Shop now Shop now Shop now See more Shop all Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Shop Fire Shop Kindle Paperwhite Shop now Discover more Shop now

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5 stars
169
4.9 out of 5 stars
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

on 4 August 2011
In August 2008 I ordered 'The Hidden Assassins' by Robert Wilson. The Hidden Assassins I was not pleased when the Amazon Marketplace supplier sent me a copy of 'Hidden' by Cathy Glass. Not my sort of book. When I pointed out their error they told me to keep it and immediately sent me a copy of the book I had ordered. Both books have sat unread on my shelf for 3 years until last weekend when I picked up 'Hidden'. I read the first 150 pages on Sunday night, eventually setting it down after 1.00am. I have to work!

Perhaps it is my sort of book after all. Cathy Glass knows how to tell a good story and this is a good story. We are all vaguely aware of foster-parenting going on and may even know some foster parents but I had no idea of all the extra stuff that entails - on top of the job of being a good parent. All the people who are involved in the complex system which has evolved to protect vulnerable children who are taken into care. This book was an education in the social care system and the role of (now I am going to have to say some bad words) social workers. There, I've said it. We hear and see so much about the failings and disasters of social workers and social care - I was ready for the tirade. However in this case all those in offialdom (or almost all) shine out as caring professionals who get it right. They have a lot to put up with and yet they do the job well. I wonder how many more successes there are who we never hear about.

The 'star' of the book is Tayo a 10 year old removed from the control of his mother and placed in the care of Cathy. Tayo is the 'Hidden' one and a representative of many more hidden ones. A young boy brought into the UK from Africa who after 5 years living here still does not exist in the official world. No national insurance number, no GP, no dentist, no permanent place of abode, dragged around by a drunken, drug-fuelled mother who is also Hidden. The life he lead prior to being placed in care is beyond belief, including a year working in an East London sweatshop when he was 8 years old. He lost that job when he got seriously hurt in a factory accident but even then he got no medical treatment because he was Hidden. How does this go on in Britain today?

Ultimately however this is an optimistic story of hope triumphing over great adversity and it is a gripping read. I recommend it and send my belated thanks to the book seller for that silly mistake they made three years ago. Must read 'The Hidden Assassins' some time soon too.
0Comment| 15 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 9 February 2015
This book is an amazing story once again about Cathy Glasses experience fostering. This book is about a boy called Tayo. You really have to read this remarkable true story.

I admire Cathy so much her writing is so gripping and her book have opened my eyes to what children have suffered. How can you neglect a child, not love a child.

Thank goodness there are people like Cathy who put their heart and sole into fostering
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 13 February 2015
This is the second book I have read by the author Cathy Glass,
And much to my delight it was as good as the first.
It gives a good insight to the unfortunate and sad lives of the
Children in our care system. This book ending with a delightful
And very happy ending.
I thoroughly enjoyed this book, rated as 5 stars, a rarity for me but very well deserved

Highly recommended
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 8 June 2015
A fantastic book this is my faith book of Cathy Glass what a terrific foster parent she was and what a writer once you start to read her books you find it difficult to put the book down It also shows the problems that the social services have and how hard they work with these unfurtunate children .Well done Cathy Glass for writing these wonderful storeys ,without theses books people would not believe the type of world we live
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 30 May 2014
This was a wonderful story, much different from the usual stories of abuse and hurt. The lovely part about this story was that there really was a magical fairy tale ending. This was written in a way that was not shocking by its content but saddening by its reality. I really enjoyed the book. look forward to more of Cathy`s books.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 28 June 2014
Absolutely loved this book. I have read all of Cathy's books in chronilogical order and for me, this story has the happiest ending. It was like something out of a fairytale. Its a book that proves a child's mind has the ability to retain and remember things from a very young age - especially when they're the best memories the child has. At first the stories this little boy tells about his dad seem mythical and made up by him because he idolised father. However all the stories of his wonderful, sporty and rich dad are true. This book also proves that miracles really can happen, and can lead to tear-wrenching happy endings.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 24 September 2014
Chose the rating because it's a fantastic book with the best ending possible. His mother annoyed me although I hope she's OK. Congratulations to this young man and his father. Congratulations Cathy as well. You do a wonderful job
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 29 May 2014
Beautiful story, from the start, Cathy has you sitting on the edge wondering what has happened to this child and what will unfold. Told with Cathy's sensitivity and professionalism. An absolute must read for anyone interested in children's welfare.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 3 July 2016
In August 2008 I ordered 'The Hidden Assassins' by Robert Wilson. The Hidden Assassins I was not pleased when the Amazon Marketplace supplier sent me a copy of 'Hidden' by Cathy Glass. Not my sort of book. When I pointed out their error they told me to keep it and immediately sent me a copy of the book I had ordered. Both books have sat unread on my shelf for 3 years until last weekend when I picked up 'Hidden'. I read the first 150 pages on Sunday night, eventually setting it down after 1.00am. I have to work!

Perhaps it is my sort of book after all. Cathy Glass knows how to tell a good story and this is a good story. We are all vaguely aware of foster-parenting going on and may even know some foster parents but I had no idea of all the extra stuff that entails - on top of the job of being a good parent. All the people who are involved in the complex system which has evolved to protect vulnerable children who are taken into care. This book was an education in the social care system and the role of (now I am going to have to say some bad words) social workers. There, I've said it. We hear and see so much about the failings and disasters of social workers and social care - I was ready for the tirade. However in this case all those in offialdom (or almost all) shine out as caring professionals who get it right. They have a lot to put up with and yet they do the job well. I wonder how many more successes there are who we never hear about.

The 'star' of the book is Tayo a 10 year old removed from the control of his mother and placed in the care of Cathy. Tayo is the 'Hidden' one and a representative of many more hidden ones. A young boy brought into the UK from Africa who after 5 years living here still does not exist in the official world. No national insurance number, no GP, no dentist, no permanent place of abode, dragged around by a drunken, drug-fuelled mother who is also Hidden. The life he lead prior to being placed in care is beyond belief, including a year working in an East London sweatshop when he was 8 years old. He lost that job when he got seriously hurt in a factory accident but even then he got no medical treatment because he was Hidden. How does this go on in Britain today?

Ultimately however this is an optimistic story of hope triumphing over great adversity and it is a gripping read. I recommend it and send my belated thanks to the book seller for that silly mistake they made three years ago. Must read 'The Hidden Assassins' some time soon too.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 4 April 2012
I love Cathy Glass's books and thoroughly enjoyed this book about a mixed race little boy called Tayo who was brought back to England from Nigeria by his mother who has serious drug, alcohol and anger problems resulting in her son being taken into care. Tayo remembers his childhood in Nigeria and keeps telling Cathy that his dad will come and look for him. Cathy give lovely account of how this little boy's life changes (for the best) with a very happy ending when his father does eventually track him down and Tayo returns to his family in Nigeria. Beautiful story.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse