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Here Comes Everybody: The Power of Organizing Without Organizations Paperback – 24 Feb 2009

3.8 out of 5 stars 12 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 344 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Books; Reprint edition (24 Feb. 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0143114948
  • ISBN-13: 978-0143114949
  • Product Dimensions: 13.2 x 1.8 x 20.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 597,558 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

"Clay has long been one of my favorite thinkers on all things Internet-- not only is he smart and articulate, but he's one of those people who is able to crystallize the half-formed ideas that I've been trying to piece together into glittering, brilliant insights that make me think, yes, of course, that's how it all works." --Cory Doctorow, co-editor of Boing Boing and author of "Overclocked: Stories of the Future Present,"

"Clear thinking and good writing about big changes." -Stewart Brand "Clay Shirky may be the finest thinker we have on the Internet revolution, but Here Comes Everybody is more than just a technology book; it's an absorbing guide to the future of society itself. Anyone interested in the vitality and influence of groups of human beings -from knitting circles, to political movements, to multinational corporations-needs to read this book." -Steven Johnson, author of "Everything Bad Is Good for You" and "Emergence" "How do trends emerge and opinions form? The answer used to be something vague about word of mouth, but now it's a highly measurable science, and nobody understands it better than Clay Shirky. In this delightfully readable book, practically every page has an insight that will change the way you think about the new era of social media. Highly recommended." -Chris Anderson, editor-in-chief of "Wired" Magazine and author of "The Long Tail" "In story after story, Clay masterfully makes the connections as to why business, society and our lives continue to be transformed by a world of net- enabled social tools. His pattern-matching skills are second to none." -Ray Ozzie, Microsoft Chief Software Architect "Clay has long been one of my favorite thinkers on all things Internet-- not only is he smart and articulate, but he's one of those people who is able to crystallize the half-formed ideas that I've been trying to piece together into glittering, brilliant insights that make me think, yes, of course, that's how it all works." --Cory Doctorow, co-editor of Boing Boing and author of "Overclocked: Stories of the Future Present."

About the Author

Clay Shirky teaches at the Interactive Telecommunications Program at NYU, where he researches the interrelated effects of our social and technological networks. He has consulted with a variety of Fortune 500 companies working on network design, including Nokia, Lego, the BBC, Newscorp, Microsoft, as well as the Library of Congress, the U.S. Navy, and the Libyan government. His writings have appeared in the "New York Times," the "Wall Street Journal," the "Times of London," "Harvard Business Review," "Business 2.0," and "Wired," and he is a regular keynote speaker at tech conferences. Mr. Shirky lives in Brooklyn.


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3.8 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
Clay Shirky explains the social importance of new technology using a very old-fashioned technique... that of story-telling! I found Here Comes Everybody fascinating to read, not only because it's enjoyable and surprising, but because I had to re-think many of my attitudes and assumptions about the effects of the internet, mobile phones and other technologies. From explaining new forms of political protest - including how Flash Mobs changed purpose from New York to Minsk - to telling me how I should think about and understand Wikipedia once and for all, this is a profound and original book on how our world is changing.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I am a Computer Science student, but originally I studied Communication. When I started my communication degree I knew I would write my dissertation on how the internet has affected communication, but I changed degree and instead built a facebook application. This book has taken my two big passions in life and combined them in a way that I continually attempt to, and in a much more eloquent style than I could ever achieve.
Clay continually uses examples that for anyone who uses web resources on a daily basis can relate to. He takes these examples and highlights not only the positives that they have generated, but their limitations too. His insight into what we previously believed to be technological implications shows us that indeed they are not technological, but human social limitations. Coupled with the depth of compassion towards humans, Clay continually reminds me that humans are essentially good but require the tools to be able to put that goodness into practice.
My favourite part is his comparison of the internet and web to the printing press pushing aside the scribes. I truly believe that we're watching the birth of a new cultural revolution, Clay sees it and the examples I have taken away from his writing allow me to show the changes to my friends and family that otherwise lay blind to it.
If you are even slightly interested in the web, communication, or modern culture then you must read this book. Thanks Clay for writing such an insightful and positive guide to this culture's birth.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
IMPORTANT: This is a review on "this particular Kindle edition", not on the book itself.
The book is fantastic.
However, when searching in the Kindle Store, you get "this copy", and another one, more expensive, with an older publishing date.
This seems to be a stolen copy, scanned and with bad OCR, which means it's full of typos, it's formatted incorrectly, and it's missing pictures.
I'm really surprised Amazon would allow something like this in here
DO NOT BUY THIS COPY, buy the other one.
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Format: Hardcover
This is one of the best books I have read recently (counting books fact and fiction), it is extremely well written and obvious care was taken to make it flow from beginning to end. Shirky has an extensive Bibliography, but instead of intruding into the text it is collected at the back with chapter and page links and short explanations. There are many excellent points made and I have cited them to friends and colleagues as I read the book. I guess the fact that stays most with me is the explanation of Participation Imbalance, for example many people use Wikipedia but few contribute, of those who contribute many only contribute once, but the small percentage who contribute a lot and care for the quality is enough for sustainability.

I see this as an antidote for Keen's; "Cult of the Amateur". Keen want the reader to feel sorry for professions that were lost to technological advances, while Shirky shows that such change has happened many times in the past, and points out changes such as writing going from a profession to an everyday skill.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
but doesn't dwell on the dark side..

Clay Shirky is primarily interested in the sociological effects of the internet and other networking tools (mobile phones etc.), or how people use them and are affected by them. Anyone with a mobile phone will be familiar with the looser social arrangements it allows. (I'll text you when I get there etc.).

In essence his thesis is that the costs of networking have collapsed and allowed us to try before you buy (or publish then filter as he puts it rather than the other way round as was the case).

In the past only companies had the resources to publish in any meaningful way, and they had to weigh up the cost of trying things and had to play safe as a consequence. He's broadly correct on the positive way that the internet has enabled Linux, wikipedia and other social networking sites (facebook, stay at home mums etc.) to exist where they couldn't have before, but he doesn't address the fact that there is a negative side to all of this - cyberbullying being a classic example. Now we're all networked the pursuit of the mob is harder to escape, he also doesn't address online vigilantism - PC Pro's columnist Dick Pountain has complained about articles being deleted by rogue groups of over-vigilant un-knowledgeable users.

His book reads very well and is full of well considered stories which pull you through, it's worth a read for anyone who liked 'The Future Just Happened' or the 'The Long Tail: How Endless Choice Is Creating Unlimited Demand'.
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