£1.99
FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books.
In stock.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Henry V : (Wordsworth Cla... has been added to your Basket
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Henry V : (Wordsworth Classics) Paperback – 5 Jun 2000

4.5 out of 5 stars 19 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£1.99
£0.01 £0.01
Promotion Message 10% Bulk Discount 1 Promotion(s)

Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more
£1.99 FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books. In stock. Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Save 10% on Books for Schools offered by Amazon.co.uk when you purchase 10 or more of the same book. Here's how (terms and conditions apply) Enter code SCHOOLS2016 at checkout. Here's how (terms and conditions apply)

Frequently Bought Together

  • Henry V : (Wordsworth Classics)
  • +
  • Henry IV Parts 1 & 2 (Wordsworth Classics)
  • +
  • Richard II (Wordsworth Classics)
Total price: £5.97
Buy the selected items together

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Paperback: 153 pages
  • Publisher: Wordsworth Editions; 1st. Edition edition (5 Jun. 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1840224215
  • ISBN-13: 978-1840224214
  • Product Dimensions: 12.4 x 1 x 19.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 28,974 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Amazon Review

"Cry, 'God for Harry! England and Saint George!'" Henry's V's rallying cry to his soldiers before Harfleur has become an iconic rallying cry for English nationalism. More than any other Shakespeare play, Henry V has been seen to define what it means to be English in its account of Henry's triumphant victory over vastly superior French forces in 1415. The play has been endlessly quoted by politicians as an incitement to patriotism, and Laurence Olivier's ground-breaking film of the play was dedicated to the Allied soldiers who landed in France on D-Day in 1944.

More recently critics have questioned the extent to which the play is simply a piece of nationalist propaganda, pointing to the more ambivalent reflections on the cost of war voiced by various characters throughout the play. As one of Henry's soldiers reflects on the eve of the Battle of Agincourt, "if the cause be not good, the King himself hath a heavy reckoning to make". Henry himself has already been defined as a cunning and rather unsympathetic character in Henry IV Parts One and Two, and his cynical manipulation of patriotism in his pursuit of military glory is incisively undercut by the Irishman Macmorris' poignant question as to "What ish my nation?" This more ambivalent dimension of the play is most effectively captured in Kenneth Branagh's post-Falklands film, Henry V, which portrays a king much more aware of the dreadful consequences of going to war. Branagh's film suggests that Henry V ultimately questions, rather than endorses the glory of going into battle for one's country. --Jerry Brotton

About the Author

William Shakespeare (1564-1616) needs little introduction. As we approach the four-hundredth anniversary of his death, his reputation as one of the greatest writers in the English language is undeniable - except by those who attribute his works to other writers.


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

By M. Dowden HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 7 Mar. 2010
Format: Paperback
Henry V, one of Shakespeare's historical plays has to be one of the most patriotic plays ever written in the world. Although slightly ambigious in its entirety there have been two major film versions. Olivier's performance was in the Second World War and is seen as more of a patriotic call to arms, whereas Branagh's performance can be seen as one that deals more with the horrors of war. Indeed reading the play carefully you can see both of these viewpoints.

Taking place during the Hundred Years War, the Henry 'Prince Hal' in Henry IV has now grown up and become the king. This play centres on the events up to Agincourt and the immediate aftermath. Some of the speeches in this will make your hairs stand on end, instil patriotism in the heart and make you proud of being from this nation.

Perhaps not as popular at the present time this is still something that you can really get your teeth in to. There is of course comic relief here, especially with a stereotypical Welshman. This is somthing that you should really read, and I can promise you that you will enjoy it. One can only imagine how this was originally performed on such a small stage and it is a tribute to the language of Shakespeare that this is still performed.
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
For what is worth I love Henry the Fifth as it's one of my favourite history plays. I miss though Sir John Falstaff, when on Henry the Fourth he was a main act, here is never mentioned by his old pal; the former Hal, Harry, or Henry Prince of Wales, now Henry V. The King.

This, like all Wordsworth Classic, is value for money - though for 3.99 you can get on Amazon, Henry V on Oxford World Classic which is for all accounts; binding, notes, ancilllary information, etc, far superior.

Still 5 star for me - as if you love Shakespeare this edition is still done well and has all the essentials - if you study at Uni level then I'd advise a better (dearer) edition like Oxford, Cambridge, RSC or Arden.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
"Once more unto the breach, dear friends, once more; Or close the wall up with our English dead! In peace there’s nothing so becomes a man As modest stillness and humility; But when the blast of war blows in our ears, Then imitate the action of the tiger" (III, i, 1-6)."

This play celebrates one of history’s most amazing military upsets. This was the English victory over the French at Agincourt during the Hundred Years’ War. We get a some small amounts of comic relief as the action progresses but there are no major sub-plots.

Saying that there is a reasonable amount of ambiguity in the play. This has led to diverse interpretations in performance. Laurence Olivier's 1944 film, made during the Second World War, emphasises the patriotic side. It ignores the fact that the enemy of the play, the French, were in fact allies in that conflict. Kenneth Branagh's 1989 film stresses the horrors of war. A 2003 Royal National Theatre production featured Henry as a modern war general, ridiculing the Iraq invasion.

The play is the final part of a teratology, preceded by Richard II, Henry IV, Part 1 and Henry IV, Part 2. The original audiences would thus have already been familiar with the title character. Henry was depicted in the Henry IV plays as a wild, undisciplined lad known as "Prince Harry" and by Falstaff as "Hal". In Henry V, the young prince has become a mature man and embarks on a successful conquest of France.

In analysing it, I found it easier to divide it into four parts:

1. the events leading up to the war between the English and French forces,
2. preparations for battle,
3. the actual battles, and
4. the aftermath of the war.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I love this play! I had bought the complete works of Shakespeare in a huge volume which is too large to carry around, or even read easily. This book is small, light and easy to read wherever you are. Good value for money.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Never read any Shakespeare before. Saw a clip of Henry V at university during s lecture on leadership. Looked fantastic so wanted to read the story. Absolutely love it! Book is brilliant with lots of footnotes and a section to define certain words in the back so if you don't want to use it there is no break in the literature. Brilliant story and easy to read.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I have argued, with support from a couple of my senior Shakespeareans at SAA, that Henry V is the comedy Shakespeare promised at the end of 2 Henry 4, epilog: "to continue the story, with Sir John [Falstaff] in it. But after the actor who played Falstaff disappeared (Will Kemp--probably to tour Germany), Shakespeare created a very different kind of comedy, a reconciliation of conflicting nationalities in the usual comic resolution, however preposterous: marriage. And in a thoroughly modern (even modernist) touch, the spirit of comic reconciliation pervades the play through its linguistic playfulness. This is Shakespeare's only play using national accents: French, Welsh, Scottish, Irish and of course English.
I would speculate that the "Great Britain" only enshrined around a century later (1705?) was initiated under James I, and here in Shakespeare's Henry the Fifth, previewed. The comic interlude of Fluellen and Jamy, etc, features the strong Scottish and Welsh accent, where for instance Fluellen says, "Alexander the Pig." He is corrected, "Don't you mean Alexander the Great?" F, "The great, or the pig, are all one reckonings..."
Later in the play, the King "claims kin" with F's despised Welsh minority; "For I am Welsh, you know, good countryman" (4.7.105). And Fluellen may speak English "funny," but he is an excellent soldier, and very knowledgeable about the history of warfare, especially Roman.
Well, all this is available in Fran Teague, Acting Funny in Shakespeare, which I heartily recommend with self-interest.
Olivier's film gets the comedy right; Branagh's does not.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback