Buy Used
£2.80
FREE Delivery on orders over £10.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: This book is eligible for free delivery anywhere in the UK. Your order will be picked, packed and dispatched by Amazon. Buy with confidence!
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Heaven's Net is Wide Hardcover – Unabridged, 7 Sep 2007

4.6 out of 5 stars 25 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover, Unabridged
"Please retry"
£297.35 £0.01
CD-ROM
"Please retry"
£90.00
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions

Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Hardcover: 592 pages
  • Publisher: Macmillan; Main Market Ed. edition (7 Sept. 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 023001397X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0230013971
  • Product Dimensions: 13.8 x 4.5 x 21.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (25 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 353,989 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

'How I do love it when people think outside the box, and writing a fantasy series which is not exactly a fantasy...'
-- Myshelf

'It was pure pleasure.'
-- Sunday Telegraph

'Lian Hearn has written a saga that will continue to give pleasure to many'
-- Guardian

Book Description

The stunning prequel to the Tales of the Otori, the final outing into the magical, mystical world of an ancient, feudal Japan.

See all Product Description

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Absolutely awesome start/end of the best series of books i've ever read. there is no higher praise.
Feudal japanese set tales of samurai, geisha, swords, blood, treachery, intrigue, and love. The complex, entertaining and beautiful history of the otori is finally finished with Heaven's Net is Wide - the last in the series and a prequel to the other books.
This book is in third person like the recent and equally awesome Harsh Cry of the Heron, and unlike the original trilogy told from Otori Takeo's perspective.
This is the story of Shigeru, Takeo's adoptive father/uncle and reveals the much wondered about events prior to the first book - the legendary battles and the real story of Shigeru's brother and tribe knowledge. all the character's that get little time in the trilogy are explored and personalised in this volume.
It is awesomely written, moody and evocative, tranquil, yet gruesome in equal measure. It serves as an awesome way into the series and can be read first (as Hearn must now intend) as the book leads on to within 6 pages of the start of Across the Nightingale Floor. Alternatively it can be read last - like i read it - revealing the legendary events the other books are based on. there are one or two instances where it's prequel nature is apparent - sentences like - (name) who would go on to become suchandsuch in the near future. these originally made me think a first time reader should start with the trilogy but upon research i found that these types of sentences appear throughout the series. i now think it is a great place to start as Hearn now intends and should be on your reading list soon.

incredible, atmospheric and complex.
involving and entertaining - a book to treasure -
there are so few this good. 10/10
Comment 30 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I felt this book was better written than the trilogy, the writing was more fluid and flowed. It gave me a deeper understanding of Otori Shigeru and his relationship with Naomi Muruyama. It also tidied the loose ends of the trilogy and gave more background about how the war began. It actually made me read the trilogy again, probably because I've read them years ago and couldn't remember much.
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I really enjoyed reading this. It was great to get to know the young Shigeru and see how he became the man he was. I found reading this book to be an especially peaceful time, though there are some great laughs and fights in there too. I think this may have even been my favourite book of the series simply because of how it left me feeling after I'd finished it. I'd recommend this book 100%, even as a stand alone novel.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
This is a strangely disappointing book.. For those who have been following the fortunes of the Otori clan it will be a must buy. Yet at the same time it is curiously unsatisfying. Whilst it fills in some details of history that pre-date "Across the Nightingale Floor" it adds little to our understanding of the motivation of the main characters in the later books as this was already clear. The strangely compressed ending, when Hearn appears to be in a rush to get Shigeru across to Mino, killing off Takeshi and Komori (who puts in a late and unconvincing reappearance) in the process seems to be driven more by the need to end the book and link it back into "Nightingale" than by clearly worked out narrative structure. That said, Hearn displays all her old skills in evoking the world of a semi-mythical medieval Japan. Particularly interesting is how she uses the possibility of Nestorian Christianity having reached Japan in the 9th Century as the basis of the Hidden, as indicated by the name of one of her Hidden characters. In the end I am glad I read it (if only out of a sense of completing the set), but I am not sure that it has added anything to my understanding or appreciation of the previous books in the series.
2 Comments 12 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Heaven's Net is Wide is a prequel to the Tales of the Otori trilogy. I read the books of the trilogy as they were published, and have now reread them, together with The Harsh Cry of the Heron (the last book).

All five books in the Tales of the Otori are historical fantasy, and take place in the Three Countries. It's a medieval setting, and borrows from both Japanese history and mythology. The Three Countries have a feudal society, with clans governing fiefdoms and a caste structure including peasants, farmers, merchants and warriors. There is also a secret organisation known as the Tribe: assassins, spies and warriors who possess various superhuman abilities but must be trained in mastering their use.

The events in Heaven's Net is Wide take place about seventeen years before the trilogy, and follows the life of Otori Shigeru, the heir to the Otori Clan, from the age of twelve until his meeting with Tomasu at the beginning of `Across the Nightingale Floor.' I enjoyed this: getting to know Shigeru as he grew from childhood to adulthood and watching his plans unfold. Shigeru grows to adulthood against the backdrop of a threatening war between the Otori and Tohan clans, and the wider story also includes information about the politics of the Tribe and the rising influence of a group known as the Hidden.

It's a great introduction to the world of the Otori, and added immensely to my (re)enjoyment of the other books in the series. Otori Shigeru was my favourite character from `Across the Nightingale Floor' and the expanded version of his story provides welcome detail of his life.

Jennifer Cameron-Smith
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Look for similar items by category


Feedback