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Hearts and Minds

Hearts and Minds

1 Jan 2000
5.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review

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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 1 Jan. 2000
  • Release Date: 14 April 2008
  • Label: Decca (UMO)
  • Copyright: ℗© 2000 Concord Records, Inc.
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 1:05:51
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B0026TV9JY
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 534,551 in Albums (See Top 100 in Albums)
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By Peter Durward Harris #1 HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on 8 Aug. 2003
Format: Audio CD
When this album was released, we were not to know that this was to be Susannah's last set of new recordings. The pictures on the cover and inside suggest that Susannah was very happy with life, even if she had put on a lot of weight. No clues in the song selection either, which were mostly typical of the material that Susannah recorded, except Computer age, a witty song about modern life that she wrote herself. Yet, less than a year after the release of this album, Susannah committed suicide.
Aside from Computer age, there are a few songs from Susannah's traditional source, the Great American Songbook, but on this album there are many more contemporary songs than usual. The set begins with two popular oldies - I can dream can't I and Love is here to stay. Do not panic if you normally buy Susannah's album for the oldies - some of the contemporary songs are excellent, including Feet do your stuff and Do you miss New York.
This album may be a little different from Susannah's earlier music, but it's not that different and it is, of course, brilliant. I have never worked out which is her best album of all, but I do not need to because they are all wonderful.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta) (May include reviews from Early Reviewer Rewards Program)

Amazon.com: 3.7 out of 5 stars 16 reviews
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant to the end 8 Aug. 2003
By Peter Durward Harris - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
When this album was released, we were not to know that this was to be Susannah's last set of new recordings. The pictures on the cover and inside suggest that Susannah was very happy with life, even if she had put on a lot of weight. No clues in the song selection either, which were mostly typical of the material that Susannah recorded, except Computer age, a witty song about modern life that she wrote herself. Yet, less than a year after the release of this album, Susannah committed suicide.
Aside from Computer age, there are a few songs from Susannah's traditional source, the Great American Songbook, but on this album there are many more contemporary songs than usual. The set begins with two popular oldies - I can dream can't I and Love is here to stay. Do not panic if you normally buy Susannah's album for the oldies - some of the contemporary songs are excellent, including Feet do your stuff and Do you miss New York.
This album may be a little different from Susannah's earlier music, but it's not that different and it is, of course, brilliant. I have never worked out which is her best album of all, but I do not need to because they are all wonderful.
5.0 out of 5 stars Last of the Great Dames, RIP 14 July 2016
By AMN - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Always love her
4.0 out of 5 stars Four Stars 8 Oct. 2014
By Cristian E. - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Excellent!!!
4 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Susannah - A True JAZZ GENIUS 20 May 2001
By Daniel J. McGarigle - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Susannah McCorkle is a true jazz genius. She constistantly makes great music, by singing great songs with a great voice, to bring her own message to the audience. She is completely free to address any subject because her GREAT TALENT, intense concentration, complete command of her instrument and unfailing desire to communicate give her that rare ability to communicate anything she wants to say. And Susannah has a lot to say about music, people, love, and life. ONLY THE GREAT HAVE REACHED her level of accomplishment. So, if you have any need to know anything about your own life, or need any help saying what you have to say, then listening to SUSANNAH MCCORKLE sing songs will teach you about what you are. THAT'S WHAT A GREAT ARTIST DOES.
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brave Soldier, Noble Soul 16 Jun. 2001
By Samuel C. - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
"There's something irresistible in Down. You can't help falling, the grave is calling." Does this line from one of the songs hold any sort of key to the sad and shocking endof Susannah McCorkle? More importantly, what does it tell us about her art, her personal voice, her contribution?
I had always respected her good taste, impeccable diction, choice of material and accompanists. But frankly the single cuts I'd heard on radio had never prompted me to purchase the recordings. Instead, I was reminded of interpretations of the same material by other singers with warmer vocal quality, more confident intonation, more consistent control, more sensuality. But after hearing this album, I'm a believer.
The first several cuts--familiar standards--do little to impress the listener. The voice seems "cold," a bit rough and husky, a trifle insecure. I notice the curious articulation of the interdental consonants (the tongue momentarily "sticks" when she gets to a "t" or "d"). Then she gets to "For All We Know." From here on the music overcomes all resistance, getting under your skin and creating a warm glow, then spreading to the heart where it begins to cut deeply.
"Everybody's got scars on the way to the stars from crash landing on Mars." She confronts and manifests pain like few other artists. Anyone close to this business knows how tough it can be, how impossible even. Perhaps the real marvel is that Susannah pursued her passion and connected with so many for so long. And it's obvious she could have fun with it, and in an ironic, detached sort of way. "The Computer Age" is a comprehensive catalog of the uses of technology and the dangers to human relationships ("We should be in bed holding each other tight, Not cybersurfing all night"), to self-reflection ("Get some control, or you'll lose your soul"), and to children ("How will they find the life of the mind? Poor kids!").
By the time she gets to "Do You Miss New York," you may wish you could tell her how much you have a reason to miss her. "If you had to face it now, do you still think you could hack it?" Apparently Susannah thought she no longer could, but perhaps a legacy such as this vital record of an artist's heart and mind can not only help the rest of us face it but somehow make it work.
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