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He Ran All The Way [DVD] [1951]

4.0 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Actors: John Garfield, Shelley Winters, Wallace Ford
  • Directors: John Berry
  • Format: PAL
  • Language: English
  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 4:3 - 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: PG
  • Studio: Optimum Home Releasing
  • DVD Release Date: 4 May 2009
  • Run Time: 74 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B001TJKVRI
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 62,972 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Product Description

Product Description

John Garfield, Shelley Winters and Norman Lloyd star in this film noir classic. Nick (Garfield) and Al (Lloyd) are involved in a payroll heist that goes wrong, resulting in a policeman being shot. Al is caught while Nick gets away, hiding out at the local swimming pool. There, he meets and charms local girl Peg Dobbs (Winters) and she invites him back to her house, unaware of the crime he has just committed. Soon things start to unravel for Nick as he holds Peg's entire family hostage, knowing that the police are getting ever closer to finding him.

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD Verified Purchase
A small time thug and loser (John Garfield) and his pal (Norman Lloyd) rob a payroll but things go wrong and a policeman is killed and Lloyd is wounded. On the run, Garfield picks up a shy wallflower (Shelley Winters) at a public swimming pool and then proceeds to hold her family hostage and terrorize them. This was Garfield's last film so it's a pity he isn't better. In fact, his performance is pretty bad. Garfield's snarling cop killer is so nasty and creepy that it's not believable that, however naive, a plain Jane like Winters would invite him into her home, much less actually fall in love with him. Amazingly, Garfield, director John Berry and screenwriter Dalton Trumbo were all under investigation by the House Of Un American Activities and, in fact, when the film was released Berry's and Trumbo's names were removed from the credits. Still, it's all pretty intense at an economical 77 minutes with fine supporting work from Wallace Ford and Selena Royle as Winters' parents and Gladys George as Garfield's alcoholic mother. The robust score is by Franz Waxman and the sharp B&W cinematography by the great James Wong Howe.

The The British Optimum Classics DVD is a crisp B&W transfer.
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I have always loved John Garfield, for a number of reasons I suppose, not the least of which he was a great (and I think vastly underrated) actor. He had amazing qualities, and he was tough and at the same time quite vulnerable. He was from a working-class background in New York, and often the roles he played reflected this. He was a tough street-kid.

This film to me is classic film noir, which I suppose simply can be summed up as American-themed movies between 1940 and the end of the 50's, with an artistic European feel. For a better analysis of film noir than mine check out the wikipedia site.

Anyway, the film is an exciting and nail-biting thriller, where a chance meeting by two people ends up in a hostage situation. I won't give the plot away at all, but suffice to say the film is exciting and enthralling all the way and has an interesting, and tragic, twist at the end.

Both John Garfield and Shelly Winters acting in this movie is terrific, and they bring the movie to life. I think that no other actor could have played the part John Garfield played; Humphrey Bogart would have been too tough, and James Cagney would have been too in control of the situation. As it is, John Garfield's character is barely in control and is desperate and at the end of his tether. His character is really a small-time hood out of his depth, and one step from disaster.

All in all, if you like John Garfield, small-time New York crime dramas and film noir, you should love this movie! I did anyway!
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Format: DVD
This was John Garfield's final film and he is utterly convincing in it. Garfield plays a man on the run who meets up with a woman (Shelly Winters) whilst hiding out at the local swimming complex. Afterwards paranoia and fear takes over and he ends up keeping her and her family hostage like in their apartment.

The movie takes mostly here therein, and the short running time of 77 minutes is just about enough for a scenario like this to stay fresh. Winters grows as the film moves on, and the acting is of a great standard. Directed well, but some of the editing is a little hammy. Still great for a movie that is now over 60 years old. It's only real weakness is that there isn't enough genuine tension given the situation that the captives find themselves in. Still very watchable.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0x98284768) out of 5 stars 13 reviews
14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x97f59f48) out of 5 stars Great film, great film noir!! 4 July 2013
By T. S. C. - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD
I have always loved John Garfield, for a number of reasons I suppose, not the least of which he was a great (and I think vastly underrated) actor. He had amazing qualities, and he was tough and at the same time quite vulnerable. He was from a working-class background in New York, and often the roles he played reflected this. He was a tough street-kid.

This film to me is classic film noir, which I suppose simply can be summed up as American-themed movies between 1940 and the end of the 50's, with an artistic European feel. For a better analysis of film noir than mine check out the wikipedia site.

Anyway, the film is an exciting and nail-biting thriller, where a chance meeting by two people ends up in a hostage situation. I won't give the plot away at all, but suffice to say the film is exciting and enthralling all the way and has an interesting, and tragic, twist at the end.

Both John Garfield and Shelly Winters acting in this movie is terrific, and they bring the movie to life. I think that no other actor could have played the part John Garfield played; Humphrey Bogart would have been too tough, and James Cagney would have been too in control of the situation. As it is, John Garfield's character is barely in control and is desperate and at the end of his tether. His character is really a small-time hood out of his depth, and one step from disaster.

All in all, if you like John Garfield, small-time New York crime dramas and film noir, you should love this movie! I did anyway!
13 of 15 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9828d594) out of 5 stars Garfield's swan song 7 Aug. 2011
By Dr. James Gardner - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD
"He Ran All the Way" is a black and white hostage drama from 1951, based on Sam Ross' (first) novel of the same name. Hostage films were popular due to the success of "The Petrified Forest" (1936), and include such films as "Heat Lightning" (1934) with Anne Dvorak and Preston Foster, "Highway West" (1941) with Brenda Marshall and William Lundigan, "Escape in the Desert" (1945) with Jean Sullivan and Helmut Dantine, and "Key Largo" (1948) with Humphrey Bogart and Edward G Robinson.

The film stars ruggedly handsome John Garfield (1913-52), the original "method" actor, as a petty thief (turned cop killer) on the run. Garfield made his screen debut in 1938 with the popular "Four Daughters" for which he received his first Best Supporting Actor nomination (he got his second in 1947 for "Body and Soul"), and "They Made me a Criminal" (1949) propelled him into the A list. He's best known for "The Postman Always Rings Twice" (1946). Blacklisted in the communist scare of the early 50s, his career was cut short, and he died in 1952 at age 39. This was his last film.

FWIW - Garfield had severe heart problems (he died shortly after the film) and was under enormous stress due to the HUAC inquisition. Where possible a double was used for the strenuous scenes. OTOH, Garfield is seen to be chain smoking throughout the film.

Shelley Winters (1920-2006) plays a lonely bakery worker who befriends Garfield only to find that she and her family are taken hostage. Winters was a great actress, nominated 4 times for an Oscar and winning twice ("Diary of Anne Frank", "A Patch of Blue"). She also earned 3 Emmy nominations and 1 win in 1964. She won the Golden Globe for "The Poseidon Adventure" (1972).

Wallace Ford (1898-1966) plays Winters' father. Ford appeared in over 100 films from 1930 to 1965, often as a comic foil. He did 5 films for John Ford including "They Were Expendable" (1945) and "The Last Hurrah" (1958). He was nominated for a Golden Laurel in 1965 for "A Patch of Blue", his last film.

Norman Lloyd (1914) plays Garfield's partner in crime. Lloyd worked with Orson Welles and John Houseman and later with Hitchcock. He was twice nominated for an Emmy and his film credits include "Saboteur" (1942) and "Spellbound" (1945). He also had an active career directing on TV, especially for Hitchcock, and produced dozens of series ("Tales of the Unexpected", "Journey to the Unknown") and TV movies.

John Berry (1917-99) directs. Berry got his start working with Orson Welles and John Houseman and was active in the late 40s. Shortly before making this film he made "Hollywood 10" (1950) about the persecution of actors and directors by HUAC, and this earned him a place on the blacklist and virtually ended his career in the US.

FWIW - Robert de Niro portrayed Berry in the film "Guilty by Suspicion" (1991).

The screenplay was written by Dalton Trumbo (1905-76), another victim of the Hollywood blacklist. Trumbo won the Oscar twice ("The Brave One", "Roman Holiday") and was nominated a third time ("Kitty Foyle"). He won the Grand Jury Prize at Cannes for "Johnny Got His Gun" (1971). He wrote "Spartacus" under an assumed name, and when Kirk Douglas insisted that his real name be used, this broke the black list.

FWIW - The film was actually produced by Garfield since he was blacklisted and unable to get a job with any of the studios. Hence the number of blacklisted people also employed. The film credit goes to his long time friend Bob Roberts.

The cinematography is by James Wong Howe (1899-1976), one of Hollywood's best cameramen. Howe's characteristic use of deep focus and dramatic lighting are well in evidence. Howe was nominated for an Oscar 10 times and won twice ("Hud" and "The Rose Tatoo"), making him one of the most acknowledged cinematographers in film history.

Franz Waxman (1906-67) provides the score. Waxman was nominated for an Oscar 10 times and won twice ("A Place in the Sun" and "Sunset Blvd"). He was a favorite of Hitchcock who used him in 4 films and earned 2 of his Oscar nominations ("Rebecca" and "Suspicion"). Among his other notable films are "Bride of Frankenstein" (1935), "Fury" (1936), and Captains Courageous" (1937). Although Waxman could be great, in this film his music is heavy handed and intrusive.

The NY Times' Bosley Crowther said "a very thin thread of plausibility is stretched exceedingly taut" but nonetheless called the film "a shock-crammed script" and praised Garfield's performance as "full of startling glints from start to end."

1951 was a good year for films. The top grossing films were "Quo Vadis", "Alice in Wonderland", "Show Boat", "A Streetcar Named Desire", and "David and Bathsheba". Oscars went to "The Quiet Man" (Director), "High Noon" (Actor), "Come Back Little Sheba" (Actress), "The Greatest Show on Earth" (Picture), and "Viva Zapata" (Supporting Actor). Other notable releases that year included "The African Queen", "The Day the Earth Stood Still", "Murder Inc", and "A Place in the Sun".

This film is often mistakenly called "noir" but it can more properly be called downbeat. The protagonist is a petty criminal with no redeeming qualities (in the first scene he curses at his mother), and the film chronicles the last day in his life following the killing of a cop during a failed robbery. There are no double nor triple crosses and no femme fatale, and there is no cast of seedy characters as is customary in "film noir". Bottom line - there is almost nothing "noirish" about this film, apart from the fact it's shot in NYC and it concerns a petty criminal.

That being said, it is certainly an entertaining film and the performances are better than average. Fans who enjoy Garfield's "tough guy" persona will find it on display here.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9838b4ec) out of 5 stars John Garfield's Final Film 21 July 2015
By Michael B. Druxman - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Blu-ray
HE RAN ALL THE WAY (1951) was not only John Garfield’s last movie before his untimely death, but his character in the picture is reminiscent of the parts he played early in his career; one of society’s losers on the run from the law.

Adapted from a novel by Sam Ross, the screenplay by Guy Endore and Hugo Butler has Garfield cast in a rather unsympathetic role. He’s a dim-witted, paranoid thug who, along with partner Norman Lloyd, takes part in a payroll robbery that goes wrong. A police officer is killed, Lloyd is badly wounded and Garfield must now seek cover as the dragnet tightens.

By chance, he meets Shelley Winters, a lonely girl, who brings him to her family’s apartment where he takes them hostage until he can devise a plan to escape. There are several tense moments during the hours in which Garfield threatens the family, and we are never really sure whether this unstable criminal will decide to kill a second time. Indeed, the second half of this taut drama, directed by John Berry, evokes memories of a later classic film, THE DESPERATE HOURS.

Garfield delivers a terrific, multi-layered performance, as does the supporting cast, which includes Wallace Ford and Selena Royle as Winters’ parents and Gladys George as Garfield’s mother, who doesn’t really care if he lives or dies

HE RAN ALL THE WAY has been newly re-mastered in HD, and the Blu-ray disc is available through Kino Lorber.

© Michael B. Druxman
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9838b870) out of 5 stars Solid if not spectacular noir-ish thriller. Garfield is great 12 Nov. 2013
By K. Gordon - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD
A neurotic, jumpy stick up man, very well played by John Garfield in his final role, has killed a cop in a botched
robbery and takes a family hostage while he tries to figure out his next move. Recalling somewhat similar
(and better) films like "The Desperate Hours" (the 1955 version) and "The Petrified Forrest", this tries to
deal on more psychological terms of the tormented bad guy and his victims, but it sometimes feels
overblown, and at others downright illogical. Shelly Winters plays the `good' daughter with a yen to go
bad, falling for Garfield (although he's so convincing at being a psychological mess, it's a little hard to
buy she falls as hard and fast as she does). None-the-less, the tension level stays pretty high throughout,
the film looks good, and Garfield does create a pretty complex and unique anti-hero, longing to trust people,
but never able to.

If not a classic, certainly worth seeing if you like the genre. Sadly, it seems to be out-of-print in the U.S.
so I had to order the region 2, U.K. version..
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9828db7c) out of 5 stars Garfield is a "one-of-a-kind. The plot is a little ... 4 Oct. 2015
By Richard R. Rutter - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Garfield is a "one-of-a-kind.
The plot is a little difficult to accept, but there is plenty of tension and excitement.
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