Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Kindle Price: £6.99

Save £8.00 (53%)

includes VAT*
* Unlike print books, digital books are subject to VAT.

These promotions will be applied to this item:

Some promotions may be combined; others are not eligible to be combined with other offers. For details, please see the Terms & Conditions associated with these promotions.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

The Hardcore Truth: The Bob Holly Story by [Holly, Bob, Williams, Ross]
Kindle App Ad

The Hardcore Truth: The Bob Holly Story Kindle Edition

4.7 out of 5 stars 66 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Kindle Edition, 1 Apr 2013
£6.99
MP3 CD
"Please retry"
£15.10

Length: 304 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Page Flip: Enabled

Kindle Books from 99p
Load up your Kindle library before your next holiday -- browse over 500 Kindle Books on sale from 99p until 31 August, 2016. Shop now

Product Description

Review

"[Holly] shoots straight from the hip with sharp thoughts that cut to the chase. For those who know of Holly's personality in and out of the ring, it provides an endearing, personal style that gives an apt representation of the author." --www.slam.canoe.ca

About the Author

Bob Holly is a retired professional wrestler whose nearly 20-year career spans several networks and championships. He lives in Dubuque, Iowa. Ross Williams, formerly managing director of a noted UK recruitment business, now works as an actor, writer and business consultant. He lives in Berkshire, England.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 7582 KB
  • Print Length: 304 pages
  • Publisher: ECW Press (1 April 2013)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00BAH7XDE
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars 66 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #157,847 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images or tell us about a lower price?


Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
A very interesting wrestling novel from an old school wrestler and a guy who's reputation precedes him. I definitely warmed more to him after reading the book and his story, it's told in a straightforward no nonsense style and is honest. A lot of these books have people trying to take shots at other wrestlers or re-write history with them looking better, this is just a straight up story from a guy who loved wrestling but wasn't afraid of pursuing honest hard work outside of the squared circle. If you get a chance listen to the Colt Cabana podcast with Bob as well - it's a great side of him to hear.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I was blown away by how much of a page-turner this was. Totally unexpected. Bob Holly's book is about as honest as it gets and should be a textbook for any sports-man/woman/entertainer attempting to write their own.

Bob is brutally honest about his experiences in wrestling, some of the people that we read about in numerous other autobiographies (his thoughts about Shawn Michaels, both then and now, are fascinating) and a career that was good but perhaps didn't reach the pinnacle of his talent. His explanation of the now famous Tough Enough incident is particularly fun to read and pretty much sums him up as a character. The wrestling industry is much worse for his absence.

A really good read.
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I'm a little surprised by this book. Here I was, expecting another wrestler to not mention names, not really give any dirt or even be that honest, Bob Holly has done the exact opposite to what everyone else has done, and gives plenty of insight into what life is really like for an eternal mid-carder. He is open and honest about himself and how he wrestles, why he didn't make it big, and doesn't seem to bothered or really blame anyone too much for that. He knew his job was to make others look better and he tried to do just that. One of the best book's on wrestling I have read
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Bob Holly is a hard man. He was born on a hard day, in a hard week, during a freak outbreak of total hardness. Got that? Good - Bob wants to make that very clear.

Bob Holly was in the WWE for 13 years. 13 years which included the Montreal Screwjob, the Attitude Era, the deaths of Owen Hart, Chris Benoit and Eddie Guerrero (and too many others), the Monday Night War, the collapse of WCW and the WWE brand extension and subsequent move to a PG product. During that time, he won precisely zero prominent titles and, to my mind at least, never had a single memorable match, angle or feud. By the time he left, he had a reputation as a locker room bully.

This book describes the life of a mid-card WWE wrestler and the sacrifices that it takes to get to that role and to stay in it. Holly is one of the guys who spent years getting beaten up for a living, making the likes of Steve Austin, The Rock, The Undertaker, Chris Jericho, Batista and Randy Orton look good so that they can go on to be superstars.

Before getting to WWE, Holly worked as a mechanic, spent his spare time racing stock cars and training as a wrestler, going through the (now familiar, thanks to the raft on wrestling autobiographies on the market) routine of brutal training and regional promotions where he would travel hundreds of miles and get paid peanuts. He also entered (and appears to have won, as a rule) legit hardman contests in Southern US bars, and, on one occasion, wrestled a bear.

Holly presents himself as a simple man, with a simple philosophy of life, based around Hard Work, Physical Strength and Toughness, Keeping Your Head Down and, most important, Respect. Holly takes respect very seriously.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Autobiographies are prone to, if not exist solely for, revisionism and score-settling, depending on the level of self-delusion and bitterness from which the author suffers, and how far from their peak they are when the book deal comes their way. Despite being about a fictional character, the Alan Partridge autobiography skewered this genre mercilessly. Sometimes when I read other autobiographies and the subject starts whining or throwing people under the bus, I no longer "hear" their voice narrating in my head, but North Norfolk Digital's finest instead.

I admit that the main reason I purchased this book was because I expected a lot of that bile from a permanently disgruntled-looking, recently-retired wrestler. You do indeed get a hearty dose of ire, but be prepared for some surprisingly balanced opinions along with the expected (and not entirely undeserved) Triple HHHatred.

Howard's employment with the WWF/WWE follows a timeline from when the wrestling business was moribund, through to its period of biggest mainstream success and subsequent dwindling due to lack of competition. He describes what the locker room was like under the Kliq, the pay-offs, the endless broken promises, and he attempts to clarify a few of the mistruths frequently parroted about his roughing up of enhancement talent.

Wrestler autobiographies are particularly tragic, as the subject invariably has to write chapters on friends who died way too soon as a result of their career choice and/or self-prescribing of medications. Fortunately, there are plenty of stories of ribbing the boys which balance this out somewhat.

Howard holds a life-long joy of fighting and evidently considers it as a measure of a man.
Read more ›
1 Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews

click to open popover