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Happy Days (The Faraday and Winter series Book 12) by [Hurley, Graham]
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Happy Days (The Faraday and Winter series Book 12) Kindle Edition

4.5 out of 5 stars 62 customer reviews

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Length: 413 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Product Description

Review

"A wildly exciting thriller" (BELFAST TELEGRAPH)

Book Description

The 12th and final Faraday and Winter novel brings the series to a devastating and exciting close.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1051 KB
  • Print Length: 413 pages
  • Publisher: Orion; 1 edition (2 Feb. 2012)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0074AGTKE
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
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  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars 62 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #44,405 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
i've loved the Faraday books but after the ending of the previous book, i wondered where the series could go and if Graham Hurley would be able to carry it off. I need not have worried. in my opinion this is actually the best book in an excellent series. i won't mention the plot (no spoiler alert needed!) but suffice to say i read it in two days and could not wait to get back to reading it; i read it slowly towards the end to savour it. A brilliant plot that pulls a lot of threads together and lots of characters from previous books appear. i highly recommend it. Brilliant!
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
For the last decade DI Joe Faraday has been a welcome interlude in and amongst the myriad of all-action investigators, super heroes who always win out in the end and, best of all, Faraday is British. Thankfully for crime detection in the UK, he does get his man more often than not but, running through the entire series, has been the on-going, relentless pursuit of Bazza Mackenzie whilst his own life began to disintegrate.

As if confirmation were needed, Faraday is no more. Any glimmer that he might just pull off a miracle escape from the clutches of pills and booze is doused in the first few pages of `Happy Days'. So, where to now?

Fortunately, DS Suttle is on form and the old reprobate ex-DC Paul Winter, brings his own and easily recognizable style to this book. Suttle has always been in play throughout the books, his promotion earned under the tutorship of both Winter and Faraday so now he takes centre stage, on the one side with Winter on the other, each wanting the same end result, the incarceration of Mackenzie.

Although this book feels at times as though all the loose ends are being sorted in readiness for the final closure, the story of Bazza's attempts at securing en election victory for his own, new Party is very well portrayed. Mackenzie's delusions of grandeur know no bounds, so it will come as no surprise to regulars that we're in for a bumpy read.

This is not the best of the 12 books but only because many of the previous stories were excellent; it would be very hard to maintain an improvement each time. This one conveys the menace of Bazza, the risks each side takes to achieve their end results and an ending which brings closure to this compelling series.
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Format: Hardcover
Happy Days is the last in the Faraday and Winter series, with a subtitle "The reckoning awaits". In this book, as Mackenzie and Winter both try to control circumstances to their advantage, each character's flaws grow more apparent and moral ambiguities become greater as they both use their wits and cunning to achieve their own goals and ends.

As this is the last book in the series, we expect some kind of resolution. Is Mackenzie now really untouchable? Can the Machiavellian Kinder turn Mackenzie from local criminal into a politician? Will the financial pressures of the recession finally hit home? And what of Winter- will he really be Mackenzie's undoing?

I won't give the plot and the ending away, but say that even after 11 previous books, this one still has great atmosphere, bold characters, excellent pace and intricate plotting with twists and turns that just keep coming - some very left field and completely unexpected as well as behaviour that occasionally seems out of character. It's a really good read and I found myself turning the pages more and more quickly to get to the reckoning. At one point I almost screamed "No - why did you do that? He's not that stupid!" When I finished and put the book down, it did leave me wondering what justice really is - I say no more.

Although Faraday and Winter are now off the scene, there is good news for Hurley fans. Jimmy Suttle is moving to the West Country for a fresh start in a new series of books - Western Approaches, here we come!!
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
.... but if you're new to the series, this is not the place to start.

Graham Hurley is surely the most under-rated writer of crime fiction in the UK, but it's difficult to see why this should be so. He's had some excellent commercial reviews - I was hooked years ago by the Sunday Telegraph review quoted on the sleeves of his more recent books: 'There is no-one writing better police procedurals today'. That is certainly true, even though I rarely agree with anything I see in the Sunday Telegraph. Why isn't he up there with the likes of John Harvey, Ian Rankin and Peter Robinson? It seems that even our most vocal traditional critics, the French, appreciate him better than we do - they have dramatised four Faraday and Wilson cases for television.

So, since I rate Graham Hurley so highly, why do I award only three stars? In short, it's because I don't think 'Happy Days' really does the business as a stand-alone novel. This, I think, is not really surprising, and my conclusion implies no criticism of the author. To explain my reasoning, I need to go back to the beginning.

'Happy Days' is the twelfth and final novel in the Faraday and Winter series, which began with 'Turnstone', almost twelve years ago. The series is in many respects extremely realistic; the characters - all of whom are skilfully drawn - act as unpredictably as real people. There are no stereotypes here, except perhaps among those at the high end of the chain of command = and perhaps that's because people in that situation do tend to conform to their sterotypical image, because that's how they achieved their high office.
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