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The Hanging Tree: The Sixth PC Grant Mystery Hardcover – 3 Nov 2016

4.3 out of 5 stars 245 customer reviews

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Frequently bought together

  • The Hanging Tree: The Sixth PC Grant Mystery
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  • Foxglove Summer: The Fifth PC Grant Mystery
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  • Broken Homes: The Fourth PC Grant Mystery
Total price: £24.47
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Product details

  • Hardcover: 400 pages
  • Publisher: Gollancz (3 Nov. 2016)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0575132558
  • ISBN-13: 978-0575132559
  • Product Dimensions: 14.8 x 3.6 x 22.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (245 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 16,147 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product description

Review

Ben Aaronovitch is a master of metropolitan magical mayhem and the action is delightful. This is a tight thriller that is compelling and buckets of fun. (STARBURST)

The Hanging Tree is definitely one of the best in the Grant/Aaronovitch pantheon. There again, so have most of the previous books in the series and the odds are the next one probably will be too. (The Bookbag)

Aaronovitch deftly balances urban fantasy with the police procedural. As for Grant, he's a wonderful blend of laconic copper and, methodically researching how magic works, full-on nerd. (Crime Scene)

This series is brilliant! (Teen Librarian)

Book Description

The sixth outing for PC Peter Grant in this bestselling series sees him back in London and facing the terrifying legacy of London's hangings.

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By P. G. Harris TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 12 Nov. 2016
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is the sixth PC Peter Grant novel by Ben Aaronovitch. Starting at the first level, they are (primarily) London-based police procedural thrillers/detective novels. That is only a thin veneer over the true theme. Early on in the first book, Rivers of London, PC Grant developed an awareness of a weirdness associated with a murder he was investigating. This lead him to be recruited by the Folly, the Met's supernatural division and its enigmatic head, Nightingale. Through the series of novels Grant and the reader are introduced to a whole demi-monde of witches, Wizards, fairies, river goddesses, ghosts and goblins. The real joy of the books is that they are very funny. Aaronovitch gives Peter Grant a snarky, cynical voice, and gets a great deal of fun out of rubbing the two genres, detective and fantasy novels, off each other. The tone is a very knowing one, with frequent, and often sarcastic, references to other works of fantasy. The most frequent nods are to JK Rowling and JRR Tolkien. Early on in the Hanging Tree there is a comment about the Shard which made me snort with laughter and which means I will never look at that building in the same way again. There is even a sideways glance at Frank Herbert's Dune here.

After the rural excursion of the previous book, Foxglove Summer, the Hanging Tree returns PC Grant to London. This is very much a good thing as Aaronovitch, like his hero, is much more at ease in the urban environment. It may be a little ridiculous to link lightweight genre novels with a more serious author, but I would say that Aaronovitch, Bears comparison with Peter Ackroyd in his love and knowledge of the capital.

The plot is based around the death of a young woman from a drug overdose in an exclusive apartment in the world of the super-rich.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
It's probably me and my advancing years but I think I'm slightly less delighted with this than the others?

I was totally enchanted with the first books in the series and loved everything about the characters, writing and plot.

Is it getting a bit same? Is not much happening? Is there any progression?

For me the answer is probably not. I'm not sure I'll buy another one but like I say it could be me - I'm getting grumpier with everything these days!
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
No real surprises; mini-clues, suspects and lots of damage. It is as well written as any of his other books in the series, but it just lacks the inventiveness,humour and plot twists. Could this be a contractual obligation book?
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Format: Paperback
This book is as compelling as it is horrific as it draws the reader into the blood soaked wretchedness of 18th and 19th Century London. Using eyewitness accounts, pamphlets and broadsheets of the time Gattrell vividly depicts what life was like for those witnessing or awaiting execution.
With morbid fascination you learn of the appalling torture of condemned souls by bungling executioners, the blood-lust of the baying mob, and the sad lack of regard placed on human life.
This book enables you to almost feel what it must have been like to be at Tyburn or Newgate on hanging day, and how executions rose to almost epidemic proportions in the 1770's for a vast range of crimes that today would warrant no more than a period of community service.
Saddened and sickened, but always morbidly inrigued, this book once started is hard to put down. If you want to know what London was really like 200 years ago this goes some way to opening your eyes. Brillian read!
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Summed up in one word... disappointing. I loved the previous books, and contrary to other reviewers, I really like Foxglove Summer, but this one... the magic has dulled, the characters have diminished - Lady Ty what happened to you? Even Beverly is a mere cipher and pretty much a nominal presence for what is after all a series concerning the rivers of London. The prose felt like it was phoned in for the advance money, the plot was stretched thin as filo pastry and definitely covered very little meat! Too much police procedural, not near enough... well anything really. And as for the blatant plugs to buy the graphic novels... *shakes head* Really Mr Aaronovitch, really? I expect better from you than that sort of lazy 'I can't be arsed to explain it so read it for yourself'. I paid good money to buy the hardback, I also pre-ordered a copy for a friend's birthday - she was also disappointed - I feel vaguely cheated. It was all going so well, but after this one... I may well wait and buy the next one second-hand for 1p and the postage from an Amazon book-seller.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Been a fan of this series since the beginning and really liked the last novel, Foxglove Summer, which attracted criticism for taking hero PC Peter Grant out of his London comfort zone - that was its strength as far as I was concerned. The latest entry in the series takes him back to The Smoke and allows Mr Aaronovitch to take pot-shots at everything from popular culture to the mega-rich while unwinding a tale of drugs, magic, occult artifacts, London history and e-bay (handy if you want sell the aforementioned occult items). Lady Tyburn, one of London's river goddesses, calls in a favour from PC Grant, the Met's apprentice wizard, after her daughter is implicated in supplying the drugs in an overdose death. She wants her daughter kept out of it. Naturally, the daughter's in it up to her almost-human neck. But there's more, including lost magical manuscripts written by Isaac Newton (himself a wizard, obviously); a US black-ops team and the unwelcome involvement of recurring bad guy The Faceless Man and former colleague PC Lesley May, who has gone over to the dark side. It's all a glorious mix as ever, with London mad and mysterious providing the backdrop along with its supernatural denizens. If there's a criticism then perhaps it's that there's more talking than action and would an alert cop really go out to confront someone who may be the deadly Faceless Man with no back-up and no plan? For me, there was also little sense of real danger and apparently, little for the PC Grant character, who faced the various vicissitudes with - mostly - apparent calm. Anyway, still a very good read and long may the series continue.
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