Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Kindle Price: £2.78

Save £7.57 (73%)

includes VAT*
* Unlike print books, digital books are subject to VAT.
Unlimited reading. Over 1 million titles. Learn more
Read for £0.00
OR

These promotions will be applied to this item:

Some promotions may be combined; others are not eligible to be combined with other offers. For details, please see the Terms & Conditions associated with these promotions.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

By the Hands of Men, Book Three:  The Wrath of a Righteous Man by [Griffis, Roy M.]
Kindle App Ad

By the Hands of Men, Book Three: The Wrath of a Righteous Man Kindle Edition

5.0 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews

See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
£2.78

Length: 326 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Page Flip: Enabled
  • Similar books to By the Hands of Men, Book Three: The Wrath of a Righteous Man

Kindle Daily Deal
Kindle Daily Deals: Books from 99p
Sign-up to the Kindle Daily Deal email newsletter to discover daily deals from 99p.
Get a £1 credit for movies or TV
Enjoy £1.00 credit to spend on movies or TV on Amazon Video when you purchase any Amazon Kindle Book from the Kindle Store (excluding Kindle Unlimited, Periodicals and free Kindle Books) offered by Amazon.co.uk. A maximum of 1 credit per customer applies. UK customers only. Offer ends at 23:59 on Wednesday, September 27, 2017. Terms and conditions apply


Product description

About the Author

Born in Texas City, TX, the son of a career Air Force meteorologist. Attended a variety of schools at all of the hot spots of the nation, such as Abilene, Texas and Bellevue, Nebraska. Sent to my grandparent’s house in Tucson, Arizona when things were tough at home. I was pretty damn lost, as my grandparents were largely strangers to me. My older brother, a more taciturn type, refused to discuss what was going on. Fortunately, like so many kids before me, I was rescued by literature. Or, at least, by fiction. In a tiny used bookstore that was just one block up from a dirt road, I discovered that some good soul had unloaded his entire collection of Edgar Rice Burroughs’ “John Carter of Mars” series in Ballantine Paperback. Moved by some impulse, I spent my RC Cola money on the first book, “A Princess of Mars.” I think what struck me was how these books were possessed of magic: they were able to transport me far from this dusty land of relatives who I didn’t know and relatives pretended not to know me to another dusty land of adventure, heroism, nobility, and even love. It was the first magic I’d encountered that wasn’t a patent fraud, and when I closed the stiff paperback with the lurid images on the cover, I decided it was the kind of magic I wanted to dedicate the rest of my life to mastering. And, thus, I was saved. Since then, I’ve never looked back. I’ve written poems, short stories (twice runner-up in the Playboy college fiction contest), plays (winning some regional awards back East and a collegiate Historical Play-writing Award), and screenplays. I’m a member of the WGAw, with one unproduced screenplay sold to Fox Television. Along the way, I’ve done the usual starving artist jobs. Been a janitor, a waiter, a clerk in a bookstore. I was the 61st Aviation Rescue Swimmer in the Coast Guard (all that Tarzan reading wasn’t wasted). I’m also not a bad cook, come to think of it. Currently, I’m a husband, father, and cat-owner. I’m an avid bicyclist and former EMT. I live in Southern California with my lovely wife. My friends call me “Griff,” my parents call me “Roy,” and my college-age son calls me “Dadman.” It’s a good life.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1465 KB
  • Print Length: 326 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 1493503448
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B01FRNX8C6
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,689,395 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  • Would you like to tell us about a lower price?
    If you are a seller for this product, would you like to suggest updates through seller support?

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
4
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 4 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
This is the third book in the ‘Hands of Men’ series by American author Roy M Griffis. I had the pleasure of reviewing the first two books and he kindly asked me to assess his latest offering.

As with the second book, the structure of ‘The Wrath of a Righteous Man’ is divided into two parts, first we concentrate on Charlotte’s story before we reconnect with Robert who now finds himself in the heat and humidity of Africa.

Meeting Charlotte Braninov again was like becoming reacquainted with an old friend. We meet her on her journey from her homeland of Russia on board a ship bound for London. Travelling with her, are the compatriots she met during her imprisonment at the hands of the Red Army. During the sea crossing we witness a different side to human nature when benevolence takes the place of brutality. Charlotte’s altruism continues to shine through as she builds a life for herself and her companions in England.

Griffis gives us a bit of humour along the way with Charlotte’s charge, Zlata, learning some very colourful language from the sailors and choosing to use it at every opportunity. We also have some lovely examples of alliteration, similes and metaphors to add depth to the descriptive passages. I particularly liked Robert’s appearance, when he looked: ‘as if he had been shat out of a dyspeptic rhino.’

I penalised the author previously as I felt Charlotte’s story was so powerful that Robert’s tale paled by comparison. However, meeting Robert again, I found I had a new respect for his character and more sympathy and understanding of the personal demons he battled. This book is much more balanced and I found myself getting as anxious for Robert when he was again called to arms, as I was for Charlotte who faced dangers of her own.
Read more ›
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition
The Wrath of a Righteous Man is the third riveting novel in the historical fiction series, By The Hands of Men.

In book three, Charlotte Braninov, Nikolai, Indrina, and Zlata were onboard a ship to London, after a harrowing escape from the Russian Reds. Although the four of them were exhausted, traumatized and malnourished they were relieved and thankful to finally be out of Russia. Once in London, Charlotte was able to arrange living quarters for herself and her friends. However, not long after she was settled, Charlotte had some distressing news about a Russian acquaintance who had gone to France for business but had never returned. Although, Charlotte didn’t relish the thought of leaving the safety of London, she felt compelled to investigate. She was horrified, though, when she found that the Russian Reds were in France. After a violent encounter with one of them, Charlotte found herself on the run, once again. There was a silver lining in the midst of her frightening visit to France though; Charlotte was able to find out that the illness that her beloved, Robert, had suffered from, caused temporary memory loss. Years back, Charlotte was crushed and humiliated when Robert acted as if he didn’t know her. Charlotte now knew, why her beloved had carried on the way he did, and Charlotte was determined more than ever to find him.

Robert Fitzgerald, while in the Crown’s service was sent to Africa. At first, he couldn’t think of a more horrible place to be, with its dangerous wild animals, cannibals, human trafficking and God awful humid heat. Robert, however, had a change of heart while in service there. It bothered him tremendously that it was almost a knee-jerk reaction to kill people. So after visiting a fallen commander’s home, he decided to settle down and care for animals.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition
"All you young people who served in the war. You are a lost generation…You have no respect for anything. You drink yourselves to death."—Gertrude Stein

Hemingway credits Gertrude Stein with naming their generation. They were the ones who came of age during the first World War, the Great War. And what was lost was a sense of direction, of being able to draw on the past for identity and guidance.

For American writers, this included a world of decadence, of the frivolous lifestyles of the very rich such as The Great Gatsby, but also the loss of innocence, the fiction that the American Dream was within everyone’s reach. For countries like England, it meant a generation literally lost, with over two million women more than men under age 45.

These are the themes of By the Hands of Men, Book Three: The Wrath of a Righteous Man, Roy M. Griffis’ epic World War I series, which sends lead characters Robert Fitzgerald and Charlotte Braninov on a search for connections to their pasts and their futures in a post-war world which has obliterated both.

This has become one of my favorite historical fiction series ever, but it is not a series where each book stands alone. If you haven’t had a chance to read the first two volumes, I urge you to do so, because the threads connecting them are carefully gathered and woven in. For example, in my previous review, I complained about a vignette in Book Two describing Charlotte’s interaction with a Jewish pawnbroker that I thought was only there to make a statement about aristocratic anti-semitism. In a similar way, as I was reading Robert’s various adventures in Shanghai and Africa, my first thought was that these were just padding to show what the rest of the world was like. I could not have been more wrong.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
click to open popover