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Talk To The Hand. The Utter Bloody Rudeness of Everyday Life Hardcover – 24 Oct 2005

2.8 out of 5 stars 56 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Profile Books; First Edition edition (24 Oct. 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1861979339
  • ISBN-13: 978-1861979339
  • Product Dimensions: 13.5 x 2.2 x 19.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 2.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (56 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 601,884 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

The effect of her book is quite inspiring, giving hope (Sunday Telegraph Australia)

Wise and witty elegy for the decline of modern manners (Red)

Heads and shoulders above the usual array of stocking fillers (The Week)

Beautifully written... a much more interesting work than either a guide to manners or a more dispassionate analysis of rudery could ever be. (David Sexton Evening Standard)

She's opposed to rudeness but on occasion is rude herself - appallingly and wittingly so! (Sydney Morning Herald)

Funny and buoyant (Sunday Times)

This fine rant against boorish behaviour. (Saga Magazine)

An entertaining rant, dotted with acute observations. (Libby Purvis The Tablet)

Highly perceptive, passionately argued and extremely funny (John Preston Sunday Telegraph)

Perfect (Sunday Express)

I'm terribly fond of Lynne Truss's book on manners, Talk to the Hand. I'd love to take tea with her but I'd be a little nervous to do so. (Patrick Marber Sunday Telegraph)

(very) readable, (very) funny, (very) engaging (Observer)

Anyone who has a sense of "the utter bloody rudeness of everyday life" will identify with much of the Truss jeremiad... a pleasingly wrathful social documentary. (Michael Bywater Telegraph)

It's bound to make you laugh and thump the table in agreement. (Sun Herald Australia)

Always fair, often funny and above all sane. (Ruth Rendell - Books of the Year 2005)

So lively, so witty, so exhilaratingly splenetic.... It doesn't really matter how many times we may have shaken our heads in disagreement with her as the experience of reading what she has to say is always so pleasurable (Craig Brown Mail on Sunday)

Bloody funny and an effin good read (Sunday Independent Dublin)

About the Author

Lynne Truss is one of Britain's top comic writers and is the author of the number one bestseller Eats, Shoots & Leaves. It has sold over three million copies worldwide and won the British Book of the Year award in 2004. She has also written four comic books, Going Loco, Making the Cat Laugh, Tennyson's Gift and With One Lousy Free Packet of Seed, all available from Profile Books. She is a regular presenter on Radio 4, a Times columnist and a guest presenter for many other programmes. She lives in Brighton.


Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By A Customer on 10 Nov. 2005
Format: Hardcover
Being a fan of Lynne Truss's writing I was looking forward to reading what she had to say on modern manners, and I haven't been disappointed. Although I enjoyed Eats, Shoots and Leaves I have to confess that the issue of punctuation is not one that is close to my heart, whereas who hasn't wanted to punch the pillock having a noisy conversation on their mobile on the train, or the person who blithley ignores us as we hold open a door for them. However this book is not merely a rant, although the parts that are verging on it are probably the funniest, rather it is an attempt to understand why people today appear to be so ill-mannered. Truss explores whether it is merely perception, or if modern manners have changed then what has precipitated it and why do we feel so aggreived by it. This is something that anyone can relate to, and wrapped up in the same great writing that made Eats, Shoots and Leaves the number one read last Christmas this book will be enjoyed enormously by anyone who reads it. And you never know, it just might start the modern manners revolution!
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Format: Hardcover
Truss attacks rudeness and boorishness after her campaign on how we use punctuation today. If you liked her last book, you’ll probably like this. However, if you didn’t like her last one, I’m not sure this would convert you.
Truss is amusing and her writing is very readable. She takes on computer lingo, irresponsible mobile use, eating in public (some thing my father abhorred) and many other such social grievances.
A book to dip into and at times sympathise with. I’m sure it will make a good Christmas present, but let’s not take it too seriously else we would be forever grumpy!
As Oscar Wilde wrote in Lady Windermere's Fan
'Whenever people agree with me I always feel I must be wrong.'
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Format: Hardcover
If you liked Eats Shoots and Leaves - and so many of us did - then you'll love this funny and pertinent appraisal of an aspect of modern life that so badly needed the Truss Treatment. There are so many things to like here. It is both an earnest and a humourous book that deals with the alienation and atomisation of the individual in an ever more crowded society that cares less and less about 'other people'. She manages to deal with the subject that more heavy-handed authors would fall foul of: she is able to negotiate the politics of the debate over rudeness without being drawn into facile class commentary or supericial assumptions about the impertinence or mannerlessness of the young. Most importantly, she achieves all this whilst raising a smile and the odd laugh, too. Great fun and thought provoking to boot.
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Format: Hardcover
…The humblest lip-reading TV viewer can spot a labio-dental fricative (or “F”) being formed on the lips of a footballer, with the result that when a permanently livid chap such as Wayne Rooney, with his veins sticking out on his neck, and jug-ears burning with indignation, hurls seventeen assorted labio-dental fricatives at the referee, there is no interpreting this as “ Actually, it was a bit of a dive, sir, but now I’ve learned my lesson and I shan’t be doing it again”. Sports is supposed to be character –forming, but people are turning out like Wayne Rooney, and we are deep trouble.
It is sentences like the one mentioned on Pages 32 and 33 that make this book a joy to behold.
Turn to page 45 and here we read:
Please, thank you, excuse me, sorry-little words, but how much they mean. Last week, a young woman sitting opposite me on a train picked up my discarded Guardian and just started reading it, and I realised afterwards that, had I wanted to do something similar, I would have used the maximum of politeness words (“ Excuse me, sorry, may I? Thank You”) instead of none at all.
What should civilised society do in the present age when the values held firm a generation ago are quickly being eroded? Here Lynne Truss takes a detailed look at modern day society and alerts us to what is wrong with it and how best to address matters that are of grave concern. The reader is urged to take a pro-active stance if he/she takes the view values are taking a downward spiral.
Social commentary at its finest!
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Format: Hardcover
I picked this book up at 11 pm and spent far too long sitting up reading it roaring with laughter. An excellent commentary on an asinine society. It's a shame she has upset people with coeliac disease, bit of an over-the-top reaction by them to a rant that was undoubtedly aimed at those dreadful people who, with pained expression, refuse to accept any food or drink you have to offer on account of some imagined (not real!!) bodily ill - all about rights of the individual rather than responsiblities to each other - which is the point of this book. This is a glorious rant with a sober undercurrent: the disappearance in the UK of respect and the ability to emphathise with and care for other people in ways that reach beyond our own misely perspective. I think it is great that she said it, and said it so clearly and so amusingly. Lynne Truss for PM? I hear there's a vacancy coming up!
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Format: Hardcover
... I'm sure you're terribly nice and that you'd be great value at a dinner party, but a fan of this new book I am not. While I am full of admiration for the fact that you haven't merely written "Son of Eats, Shoots and Leaves" (or "Eats More Shoots and Leaves" - I could go on), "Talk To The Hand" definitely smacks of needing to get a follow-up in the shops fast.
As a concept, it would have made a great magazine feature - there IS good stuff here, and it's certainly an issue that needs to be addressed - but stretching it all to book length has resulted in a rather boring, overly negative experience, unlike "Eats..." which really DID make me want to run out my house with a large magic marker.
It isn't even that funny - the weary subject matter seems to have exhausted the constant sparkle that filled her previous outing, and the examples of rudeness herein aren't particularly entertaining or shocking (as I believe they are intended to be).
Looking on the bright side, Truss's previous book has probably just sold its nine-zillionth copy, which will hopefully cut her a bit of slack for the next book.
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