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Hallelujah! An Informal History of the London Philharmonic Choir Paperback – 10 May 2007

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Product details

  • Paperback: 144 pages
  • Publisher: London Philharmonic Choir; First Edition edition (10 May 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0955568803
  • ISBN-13: 978-0955568800
  • Package Dimensions: 25.2 x 21 x 1.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,279,588 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product description

From the Publisher

Daniel Snowman joined the London Philharmonic Choir in spring 1967.
Well-known as a writer and broadcaster on matters musical, Snowman
interweaves his own vivid recollections of life in the LPC with those of
fellow members and others associated with the Choir and its history. The
result is a richly evocative portrait of a hitherto largely ignored aspect
of British musical life since the war.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

"Ladies," snarled the Chorus Master. "Please look up at Sir Adrian
when you reach your climax!" Nobody sniggered. Frederic Jackson was not the
kind of person to resort to double entendre, except by accident, while Sir
Adrian Boult, his mind evidently above such puerilities and his normally
ramrod back bent with the strain of age, glanced at his watch, clearly
anxious to get on. But the comment was typical of Freddie Jackson in some
ways, at least by the time I joined the London Philharmonic Choir forty
years ago in 1967. I recall his plaintive, slightly tetchy air, eyebrows
raised as though in incomprehension at the inadequacies of lesser mortals.
I admired him and his musicianship. But I was somewhat in awe of him,
terrified that, with his brilliant ear and impatient persona, he would
pinpoint my individual vocal failings and humiliate me in front of everyone
else.


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31 May 2007
Format: Paperback
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