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La Haine - Ultimate Edition (Limited Edition Steel Tin packaging) [DVD]

4.2 out of 5 stars 143 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Actors: Vincent Cassel, Hubert Kounde, Said Taghmaoui, Abdel Ahmed Ghili, Solo
  • Directors: Mathieu Kassovitz
  • Producers: Christophe Rossignon
  • Format: PAL
  • Language: French
  • Subtitles: English
  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Number of discs: 2
  • Classification: 15
  • Studio: Optimum
  • DVD Release Date: 5 Jun. 2006
  • Run Time: 97 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (143 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000ENUWFG
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 59,048 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Product Description

Product Description

An award-winning account of one crucial day in the life of three ethnically diverse teenagers on a housing estate in Paris. It documents the fierce loathing that exists between the estate's residents and the police, that explodes when the police beat a youngster into a coma. The three young men vent their grief, frustration and anger in different ways with deadly consequences. The film won the 1995 Best Director at Cannes and the 1996 Best Film at the Cesar Awards.

From Amazon.co.uk

La Haine is an angry, anti-authoritarian French film that concerns three young guys (a Jew, an Arab, a black) who decide to take on the police after a friend is brutally beaten. There isn't much going on in this black and white drama beyond its violence (which can be pretty hard to watch, such as an interrogation scene that incorporates torture) and gritty observations of wayward youths hanging out on the fringes of Paris. Certainly, there isn't much in the way of insight, and director Mathieu Kassovitz seems to have absorbed more of the excesses of America's independent film scene, especially Spike Lee at his most indulgent, than its blessings. But if it's edge and rawness you want, this has it--with subtitles. --Tom Keogh --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
Released in 1995, 'La Haine' (hate) was an immediate box-office success in France, and achieved critical acclaim winning the Best Director Award at Cannes for Mathieu Kassovitz, then in his late twenties. Kassovitz comes from a family of film makers, and had already established himself as both a promising actor and director.
The film captures the rigid emptiness of life in a sprawling concrete banlieu (housing scheme) on the outskirts of Paris, an environment peopled by those who lack the financial or social clout to live somewhere better. These are Eastern Bloc tenements, characterless boxes in which society's detritus can be stacked, abandoned, and - hopefully - forgotten about.
The film focuses on three lads - somewhat stereotypically a Jew, a North African, and a black African. Life in the banlieu is supposed to be a tale of sanitised boredom - surely the immigrant population should be grateful for admission to the cultural greatness of France and its capital? Only the black youth attempts to make something of it - he has struggled to build a gym and to literally fight his way out of poverty by boxing. The North African youth is an incorrigible thief and poseur. The Jewish lad, meanwhile, poses in front of the mirror, aping De Niro's taxi-driver and playing the hard man.
But the world of the banlieu has imploded in urban riot - a participant sport in which local youths can engage and enrage the CRS, the French riot police, in a game of street chess, complete with petrol bombs and baton rounds. It is, of course, an entertaining spectator sport for the film crews and media. For the rioters, their fifteen minutes of fame come courtesy of news broadcasts.
The Jewish boy finds a handgun, dropped by one of the riot police. Now he can finally imitate De Niro.
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Format: DVD
Hi, Yes, i'm French and saw La haine when it was out at the cinema. I loved it but everybody didn't thought the same (kind of the same feeling as for marmite for UK people). It's not easy to watch, there is a lot of French-city-talking that can't be properly translated and yes, as you've understood from other reviews, it's in B&W. If you feel responsible enough to buy it thengood for you. if, you manage to watch it until the end I'm sure you will not say the usual "well, it was OK but stalone would have been good in the middle"... No, it's really a very very good film. It will explain you exactly what's going on in french suburbs of Paris. Don't be afraid to go to France though as you will luckily not see that. it's iden from tourists.
On the film direction : nothing to say about the actors. they are just fantastic and no-one would have been better than them. M kassovitz is so good as a film director (as well as actor, see Amelie). He's got a real knowledge of the photography as well. The end is completely unexpected but better than what you saw in the sixth sense.... have a good film.
Oh! I forgot, o buy it, it's certainly worth having it in your collection of DVDs.
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Format: DVD
The two reviewers below seem to have totally missed the point to this film. John Evans' asserion that it is "made for middle class lefties, by middle class lefties" is an affront to the themes of this film.The other reviewer says "It's a pitty you don't get it dubbed in english, specially if you don't speack french." This also misses the point-you wouldn't have the guttral impact of the dialogue in this film if it were dubbed. French is a very expressive language and the performers would look ridiculous if English was spewing out of their mouths.

La Haine (Hate) is about normal people who live in abnormal conditions, not necessarily the WORST poverty in the world but they are not getting their fair share. Like a lot of people. The housing estates outside Paris have been enflamed again recently and this kind of proves that this is an important, polemical film that has lost none of its resonance in the eleven years since its release.

As well as the powerful story you have stylish direction and a beautiful black and white presentation. This film will not appeal to people who can't read and watch pictures at the same time, or "idiots" as I call them. Just because a film is subtitled it doesn't mean you should deride it. Neither should it be shot down as a propoganda film for "middle class lefties"-it is a depiction of the events in on day of the lives of people you may not at first understand, but will eventually come to respect and feel empathy and sympathy for (if you have human emotions at least).

A triumph in European cinema.
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Format: DVD
La Haine is an absolute cinematic masterpiece not just for its social commentary but how it infuses the personal into the public and the profound understanding of the characters and the realities that they face. It shows how feelings of hatred between friends are overcome by the deepest love in ways that a romantic fiction could only scratch the surface.

It is a story based on a day in the lives of three close friends from France's equivalent of council estates in the aftermath of heavy rioting in their neighbourhood. The film looks at the reactions of the three individuals to the disturbances and how these attitudes change as the events of the day cause the friends to gain a deeper understanding of each other. Although the plot of the film doesn't exclusively centre on this it becomes central in the final tragedy. Kassovitz' ability to draw the viewer into identifying with the three characters may mean that this review is of the objective persuasion but isn't that the beauty of cinema?

The only complaint i would have would be with the absolute mess-up that has been created with the "improved" translation. The original English subtitles were in cockney English and this dialect probably has the closest relevance to the context of the film that can be achieved within the English language. The American English translation on this latest edition throws the film halfway across the globe and fills it with blatant inaccuracies.
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