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Hacker Handbook for Beginners - How to become a hacker or to protect yourself from attacks by [Schiller, Julius]
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Hacker Handbook for Beginners - How to become a hacker or to protect yourself from attacks Kindle Edition

2.5 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews

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Length: 83 pages Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled Page Flip: Enabled

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  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1813 KB
  • Print Length: 83 pages
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B008Y512KU
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
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  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 2.5 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #516,492 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Format: Kindle Edition
you only get what you pay for in this world … if you want a history lesson from the dark ages then this is made for you ... save your bucks
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
great book and good seller
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Amazon.com: 2.6 out of 5 stars 12 reviews
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Interesting history and a fine starting point for more research 31 Aug. 2012
By Aisling D. - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The Hacker Handbook for Beginners will appeal to more than just beginners. In fact, this book might seem overwhelming for anyone without a good general understanding of -- or dedicated interest in -- coding and various kinds of computer hacks.

Despite that, Schiller provides a great, rapid overview of the early aspects of hacking, including the innocent days of phone phreaking and the BBS roots of today's highly skilled hackers. I'd forgotten much of that post-hippie era when many hacks were more random than dedicated, and Captain Crunch was among the heroes of the day. So, I smiled as I read the beginning of this book.

From that introduction, Schiller describes early hacker organizations such as MoD and LoD, and resources like Phrack and 2600.

For absolute beginners, the Hacker Handbook for Beginners includes explanations of basic terms such as white hat, black hat, and the oft-disputed concept of grey hats. He gives his definitions of hacks and cracks, and how they differ.

Schiller also covers the expansion of hacking, from events triggered by Sundevil and reactions to Tom Cruise videos, to the formation of Anonymous and WikiLeaks.

Schiller includes tips -- some easier than others -- for anyone wanting to enter the world of hacking. He includes code and resource references if you want to take this further. However, for the average reader, those tips provide insights into the complex world of hacking more than actual training in the field.

For anyone interested in the history of hacking and where it's led today, Schiller's book provides a good survey of the field, then and now.

This book was originally written in German, and some German words are still in the English edition of this book. Likewise, some of the translations can be a little confusing. There's still enough understandable information in this handbook to make this an interesting read.

You may not agree with everything Schiller says. Frankly, a few descriptions bothered me because my roots (no pun intended) at MIT give me a different perspective on hacking in general, but I'm not sure that any two people will share the exact same views about this topic.

If you remember the early days of hacking and want a stroll down memory lane, or you'd like a better understanding of hacks, cracks, and the evolution of phreaks, this is a fine starting point.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars a good introduction for newbies 5 Sept. 2012
By Fede Walliczek - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The focus of this book is on beginners who want to get an introduction in hacking, how hackers work and how to protect against them.

Hacking can be a complex topic to learn about. If you research, you immediately get to the pro forums where you won't understand a word or even worse you get one of those hacker websites that directly tries to take over your computer. There is lots of information for the advanced hacker but little information for the beginner.

This book gives a good introduction and also has a good review of the history of hacking and celebrity hackers. Even a newbie will understand the concepts and after reading this book you'll know whether you want to dig further into this topic or not.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Wouldn't be worth the price if it were free 4 Oct. 2013
By W Vincent - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Anyone looking for an introductory book on hacking would be well advised to look to a professionally edited book such as the "Dummy" series. The authors command of written English is dreadful and painful to read. While the coverage of the general subject of hacking is extremely broad, individual topics are presented in an extremely superficial manner, to the extent of being incomprehensible at times. I see no value in this book whatsoever.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Terrible. Paid little got little. 26 Feb. 2014
By Brian - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Author repeats themselves way too many times and I really don't care how the term "hacker" came about. Not why I wanted to read this book. Was hoping for more of a technical treatment.
Never mind all of the miss-spellings and 6th grade grammer mistakes.
But, this was very cheap for kindle version, so not a huge deal.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars In English, please? 19 Dec. 2012
By Tod Yates - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This book was obviously translated from German to English, and very poorly done. Numerous misspellings, grammar mistakes, and punctuation errors. In addition, the book doesn't really tell you what the title suggests, is repetitive on what is/isn't a hacker to the point of exhaustion, and veers off into entities such as Anonymous at great length for no apparent reason. Horrible read.
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