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The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People: Powerful Lessons in Personal Change by [Covey, Stephen R.]
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The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People: Powerful Lessons in Personal Change Kindle Edition

4.4 out of 5 stars 809 customer reviews

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Length: 432 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Amazon Review

The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People: Powerful Lessons in Personal Change was a groundbreaker when it was first published in 1990, and it continues to be a business bestseller, with more than 10 million copies sold. Stephen Covey, an internationally respected leadership authority, realizes that true success encompasses a balance of personal and professional effectiveness, so this book is a manual for performing better in both arenas. His anecdotes are as frequently from family situations as from business challenges.

Before you can adopt the seven habits, you'll need to accomplish what Covey calls a "paradigm shift"--a change in perception and interpretation of how the world works. Covey takes you through this change, which affects how you perceive and act regarding productivity, time management, positive thinking, developing your "proactive muscles" (acting with initiative rather than reacting) and much more.

This isn't a quick-tips-start-tomorrow kind of book. The concepts are sometimes intricate, and you'll want to study this book, not skim it. When you finish, you'll probably have Post-it notes or hand-written annotations in every chapter, and you'll feel like you've taken a powerful seminar by Covey. --Joan Price

Review

Ken M. Radziwanowski AT&T School of Business Picture someone going through the best experience they've ever had in terms of training -- that's what they say. People credit "The 7 Habits" with changing their lives, with getting back on track personally and professionally.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 6090 KB
  • Print Length: 432 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 0671663984
  • Publisher: RosettaBooks (15 Nov. 2013)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00GOZV3TM
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars 809 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #649 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Library Binding
This became a major best-seller, highly influential in both management and personal development circles. Covey's seven habits are fairly obvious, fairly simple, yet are lost in the morass of hype and counter-hype his book provoked.
Covey looked at the characteristics of the successful, reducing these to seven principles, seven good habits that successful people generally demonstrate. Developing good habits is an advantage: by definition, if they are 'good' habits, they do you good. Brian Clough, the football manager, used to insist that his players learned good habits, that they learned to do the basics, the simple things well; once they could trust themselves to do the basics, then they could progress to try the novel, the special, to inject that little spark of genius which would win the game.
But Clough was talking about football, and doing what was necessary to win the game. Covey talks about successful people. You have to keep asking, what constitutes 'successful'? Becoming rich? Or being happy, contented, in harmony with the world and the people around you?
Covey suggests you choose your own definition of success. You set your own goals. And, the first thing you have to do is believe that you can change your life. Covey's principles, then, become the yardsticks by which you both measure change and motivate yourself to change - you decide on the good habits Brian Clough demanded, and get into the habit of doing things which will aid your change.
Covey, however, relates change and success to quality of life - although his book has often been seized upon as a manual for business success and profit. He says there is no easy way to achieve change. It requires work - and requires that you develop new, good habits while eradicating old, bad ones.
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Format: Paperback
When I first got this book, I worked for a large company and I thought this books principles principles greatly improved my productivity.
Now I work for myself and have time to consider things more thoroughly, I realised that this book was partly responsible for me making myself thoroughly miserable.
It's fine to be an "effective" person - but what about your happiness? And the people around you? Is that not far more important than simply being "effective"? This book is grey and uninspiring because - although substantially better than most similar books - you still risk being turned into an automaton with regard to how you organise your life.
The first step in the book revolves around planning what people will say about you at your funeral. Well, interesting idea, but as you get older your values change. I've been "road testing" this book for three years now. I've now given up. I realise now that life is far more enjoyable when you are riding the crests of its waves, than if you spend your time locked up in a stuffy room pouring over your weekly diary, philosophising about what is the most "effective" way of slicing your life into neat half-hour chunks.
Too much emphasis on speculating on the future in todays society means few people are living life for the moment, and even fewer are fully tuned into the thoughts and feelings of those around them at any particular time.
I no longer recommend this book. As the old cliche goes: "Life is what happens whilst you are planning something else".
Jezar.
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Format: Hardcover
This is a powerful guide to self-improvement. The "habits" are common-sense: be proactive, or "seek first to understand, then to be understood". The writing is clear, presenting each habit in a way which is easy to apply to oneself. If you're looking for a self-help guide to living a more focused, targeted life, you can hardly do better than this.
The downside is that this is a massive, densely-written book. Just reading it, let alone internalising and acting on it, is a major project. Many readers will dip into it; lose interest; and let it gather dust on the shelf.
Summary: excellent self-improvement guide, won't work for everyone.
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Format: Paperback
With all of the self-help books out there, why is this one business schools, seminaries and high school students read? Why "Seven Habits Of Highly Effective People"? What does Stephen Covey have to say that differs from Spencer Johnson, Phil McGraw and John Gray?
In some cases, what Covey says they all say. The biggest difference is the process, not the method. Covey's "Seven Habits" are like eating right during the gestation of your baby. The short-term results are hard to realize, but the foundation for good health are laid. Follow what Covey says, and in the long-term, you will be highly effective.
Covey starts with explaining that the first step isn't external, but internal. It isn't just that Covey is trying to get you to feel good about your abilities. Instead, he wants you prepared for the hard work the seven habits will require. In fact, Covey deplores the cheap 'character ethic' method, noting it evolved away from character, and more into quick-fix influence techniques.
He separates influence and character, and wants the reader to know influence without character is not good. "Only basic goodness gives life to technique." The book is not a lesson in technique.
The Seven Habits are divided into chapters:
1- Be Proactive
2- Begin with the End in Mind
3- Put First Things First
4- Think Win/Win
5- Seek First to Understand, Then to Be Understood
6- Synergize
7- Sharpen the Saw
Covey, despite how it is a management and professional growth book, has also written a personal growth book. It is not a relationship book, as in the sense John Gray writes, or a weight loss book, like Dr. Phil writes. Fans of "Who Moved My Cheese" by Johnson will connect. Though Covey won't charge at the reader by asking him to repeat a mantra of "I think I can.
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