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HTML5: Up and Running Paperback – 27 Aug 2010

4.3 out of 5 stars 47 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 222 pages
  • Publisher: O'Reilly Media; 1 edition (27 Aug. 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0596806027
  • ISBN-13: 978-0596806026
  • Product Dimensions: 17.8 x 1.3 x 23.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (47 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 113,936 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product Description

Book Description

Dive into the Future of Web Development

About the Author

Mark Pilgrim works as a developer advocate for Google, specializing inopen source and open standards. You may remember him from such classics as Greasemonkey Hacks (O'Reilly), Dive Into Python (Apress), and Dive Into Python 3 (APress). He lives in North Carolina with his wife, two boys, and a big slobbery dog.


Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
I must say: I enjoyed going through this book. It is written in an opinionated and slightly irreverent style, so I found it a mildly amusing read.

That being said: why do people buy a book on HTML5? Some would like to have a good in-depth reference on the ins and outs of the new language. Well now - that's not this book. Others might be new to web development and think learning HTML5 would be a good starting point. While they are right that HTML (5 or 4) is the place to start, this book surely isn't.

There's some depth when it comes to background, but much less when it comes to HTML5 itself or how to use it. True, the <canvas> tag and geolocation are covered pretty much in detail, but the author made some hard to defend choices in spending his paper estate.

HTML5 gives us no more than a handful of new tags, still some of those (<mark> and <section>, for example) are simply mentioned once and that's that. No examples, no advise on where to use them, nothing on browser support. Yet the book takes five pages at the start to tell the story of how the img-tag came into being some 15 years ago. Again, mildly amusing, but probably not the reason you are thinking of buying this book.

Another example: there are 10 pages with a primer on audio and video codecs, plus another 19 (!) detailed pages (with lots of screen shots) on how to use a number of specific and probably soon outdated software tools to encode video for the web. All fine for those who are completely new to video encoding and believe a book on HTML5 should be the starting point for that.
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Format: Paperback
If I was to describe this book in five words, the review title says it all.

As an early (but not as early as Bruce or Remy) adopter of HTML5, I know a fair bit about the subject matter but after reading this book I realised how much I didn't know. As well as talking about the well known new features of HTML5 such as video, audio, canvas and forms, Bruce and Remy also delve into such diverse topics as ARIA (for accessibility), data storage, offline applications, the (nasty) drag and drop API and even the geolocation API (even though it's not strictly part of HTML5).

The book is littered with clear explanations and well written, amusing, sometimes weird, coding examples. There is no glossing over the fact that HTML5 is far from perfect, and that the HTML5 specification itself isn't finalised and therefore subject to change but the authors do a great job of keeping the content interesting and fresh.

It's a refreshing and honest approach to a technical book and one I highly recommend to web developers either new to the world of HTML5 or wanting to find out more.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
HTML 5: Up and Running is an entertaining and informative read, although only about 200 pages long and full of code snippets in PHP and Javascript. It's barely hinted at in the precis. In fairness, the examples are reasonably easy to understand, but there's almost no explanation of the syntax of these other languages. I guess the assumption is that if you are already proficient in HTML, then you've probably topped that up with some Javascript learning in the period prior to getting this book.

Something reading this book reveals, is that the there's more to learn about the context in which the new HTML 5 tags work than there is about the new tags themselves. An obvious example is the simplicity of the <video> tag and the complexity of audio and video codecs, MIME types, bit rates and cross-browser compatibility. The author has dug around on the web for utilities and work-arounds and that's what swathes of this book are about.

It's worth noting that XHTML has been abandoned for several years, which may come as a big surprise and disappointment to some people. O'Reilly's current Definitive Guide to HTML and XHTML won't be updated until July 2014, at which point XHTML will be dropped from the title.
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Format: Paperback
HTML5 is creating more and more a name for itself in our industry, but while it excites those on the cutting edge of web technology, many are left feeling uncertain about it. Its ongoing development has been victim of politics, fragmentation and more, leaving few to have a good grasp of its current status. However, a lot of the technologies that make up HTML5 (and more) have become mature, even implemented across all the latest browsers--but did you know that? If you've kept an arms length to everything going on with HTML5, now is the time to dive into its waters and explore.

Fortunately, you don't have to do it all by yourself: just get Introducing HTML5, written by Bruce Lawson (Opera) and Remy Sharp (Left Logic).

Exactly as its name implies, Introducing HTML5 is an introduction to all the new semantics and application-oriented technologies that make up the HTML5 spec. You don't have to be a web development expert to read this, but you'll come out closer to one when you've finished. All you need is a good grasp of web standards-based techniques, e.g. semantic markup; separation of structure, presentation and behavior; and accessibility. Bruce and Remy will teach you everything you need to know to bring your skill set to the next level.

Starting out light, Introducing HTML5 first teaches you the most important new HTML5 elements and their semantic purposes, which is especially helpful if, like me, you kept an eye on these since the early stages of HTML5, but got confused as their meanings were changed or redefined.
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